From campus to community: the Loving Spoonful Service Learning Project

By Steven Bae and Lauren Wilson, MEDS 2019

“Let food be thy medicine, and medicine be thy food” – Hippocrates

Food. It is a vital part of our existence, and is a focal point in many cultures. Over the course of one year, a person who eats three meals a day consumes 1092 meals. It plays such a large role in everyday life that sometimes it is easy for us to overlook.

The importance of food security to one’s overall health is well known. Food security is defined as “all people, at all times, have physical and economic access to sufficient, safe, and nutritious food to meet their dietary needs and food preferences for an active healthy life.” [1] A recent JAMA study reported that suboptimal intake of nutrients and healthy foods was associated with over 45% of deaths due to heart disease, stroke, or type 2 diabetes. [2] Yet for too many people, adequate access to nutritious food is out of reach. Some of these people live right in our community.

Photos courtesy of Loving Spoonful

The neighbourhoods in North Kingston make up 20% of the total population, and their average income is 22% lower than the city average. [3] The people living in North Kingston are twice as likely not to have completed high school, and twice as likely to be living on low incomes. [3] Many physicians that know their patients may not always be able to afford food ask their patients at appointments if they have enough food. Some family health teams even have an emergency supply cupboard in their office for extra food to give to patients who need it.

To increase awareness of these issues, we became closely involved in helping develop a service learning project in partnership with Loving Spoonful,  an organization that works to achieve a healthy, food-secure community. The project is structured around community cooking programs for low-income Kingston residents with medical students as volunteers. On top of building food literacy and confidence in preparing healthy foods among class participants, the goals of the project were to expose medical students to the Kingston community, provide information about food security in Kingston, and encourage them to create a dialogue with the participants in order to learn more about what they can do as future physicians.

The project also allows for students to accompany a physician from the Kingston Community Health Centres to visit the home of a patient living on a fixed income. The students have found that this experience has been eye-opening to appreciate firsthand the ways in which barriers can be specific to individuals. For example, if an individual has difficulty standing, the food s/he buys has to be prepared quickly, which limits his or her choices. Underpinning all of these experiences is a facilitated debrief and written reflection at the end, which allows students to share and document their insights, challenges, and surprises.

Ten medical students have participated in the service learning project thus far, with more students registered for this fall. All of the students have enjoyed this project in many aspects, from improving their own food preparation skills, to developing rapport with the local Kingston residents.

Overall, we are walking away with a greater appreciation for the social determinants of health. As future physicians, the social inequities that underlie many chronic diseases may seem insurmountable. However, this work is not solely our own. Organizations like Loving Spoonful play an important role in our community to address upstream factors that we eventually see presenting as illness. Being knowledgeable about the resources available in our community is a small but helpful step we can take to help our patients address challenging socio-economic circumstances.

Thank you to Loving Spoonful for your invaluable partnership in developing this project and the Kingston Community Health Centres health team for contributing to student learning. We would also like to gratefully acknowledge the City of Kingston and United Way for their Community Investment Fund, as well as the Kaufman Endowment fund, which helped fund this program.


References
[1] Committee of World Food Security
[2] Micha R, Penalvo JL, Cudhea F, Imamura F, Rehm CD, Mozaffarian D. Association between dietary factors and mortality from heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes in the United States. JAMA 2017;317(9):912-924.
[3] Kingston Community Health Centres. A community needs assessment of North Kingston neighbourhoods. June 2010

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The Meds 2019 Clinical Clerks hit the streets.

Here they come.

This week, the class of Meds 2019 begin their Clinical Clerkship. Although this is only the half-way point in their medical education, it is a highly significant milestone, marking transition from a program dominated by largely classroom based knowledge and skills acquisition, to “real life” learning in a variety of clinical placements and elective experiences. Last Friday, this occasion was marked by a White Coat Ceremony, conducted by Dr. Armita Rahmani.

 

Photo by Bernard Clark

 

To further mark the occasion, I reprise my Top Ten list of tips for Clerkship. In doing so, I recognize that these points are intended not only for the students themselves, but also for the faculty members who will be supervising and supporting them in their various clinical placements. It can sometimes be difficult to remember the challenges faced by our students entering the clinical environment for the first time. I would draw particular attention to points 9 and 10.

 

So, here goes, in no particular order…

  1. Show up, and show up on time. It all starts with dependability. Even the most brilliant among us are useless if absent or unreliable. On the other hand, there will always be a welcome for the honest, steady contributor. If you are late, apologize, and do not show up with the coffee or snack that you picked up on the way.

 

  1. Repeat after me: “I don’t know. Self-awareness is right up there with dependability. There will be things you don’t know. There will be things nobody knows. You will not get into trouble or lessen your reputation by admitting to a lack of knowledge or experience with a particular clinical situation or procedure. After all, you’re a medical student, you’re not supposed to know everything! You do need to know what you don’t know. You will have major problems if you compromise a patient’s care through your unwillingness to admit limitations.

 

  1. Make it your business to learn about things you didn’t know first time. In fact, become an expert in that issue and look for opportunities to apply your new knowledge. When you do, you’ll find it intoxicating, and will search out even more knowledge. Careers have been built on less. Regard every patient and fresh problem you encounter as your curriculum. Keep track. You’ll be amazed at what you’ll be learning, and how fast.

 

  1. Remember that no decision that’s made honestly and in the patient’s best interest can be wrong. Anything we recommend for our patients, even the simplest decision, test or therapeutic intervention must meet one of three (and only three) criteria – it must relieve symptoms, improve functional capacity or increase life expectancy. There is no other justification for any intervention. You can’t be wrong for trying honestly to achieve one of those goals.

 

  1. And yet, things can go wrong... Even the best and most obvious decision may not go the way we intend or hope for. When things do go wrong and patients suffer adverse outcomes, it must be openly acknowledged and understood to ensure everyone (including you) learns from that outcome and becomes a better provider. As a medical student, you will not be the responsible party, but are nonetheless in a position to learn. Don’t be afraid to engage such situations, and don’t hesitate to discuss your feelings and reactions with more experienced people.

 

  1. Ask questions. Not to impress or stand out, but because you really want to know, and are concerned about the impact on your patient. Ask respectfully, but don’t be afraid to challenge decisions. Good clinicians don’t mind being asked to explain what they’re doing. Really, they don’t.

 

  1. Get along. With everybody, not just those you think are important. Do this all the time. Everyone you encounter knows more about the practical aspects of health care delivery than you do. They all have something valuable to pass along if you’re attentive and receptive. I’m going to use a key word here: Humility. People can sense it and respond positively to it. The opposite is arrogance, which people can also sense but respond to quite differently.

 

  1. Eat, sleep, laugh. You’ll be busy, but not so busy that you won’t have opportunity to look after your own well-being. Use your down time wisely. Plan meals and recreation. Surround yourself with people who know you well and have the capacity to make you laugh. They will become increasingly precious to you. Talk to them.

 

  1. Be open to possibilities. If you think you’ve decided on career choice, don’t be shocked (or worse yet, disappointed) if something unexpected emerges. If you feel strongly conflicted, there’s probably a good reason. Talk it out with someone and remember it’s never really too late to change. If you can’t decide because everything seems great, that’s a good thing, but you might also need to talk it out. We’re available.

 

  1. And finally… look after each other. You know each other very well, and will know when someone is having difficulties, likely before they know it themselves. Don’t be afraid to reach out, or to seek advice or help. Our Student Affairs staff, headed by Dr. Fitzpatrick, and myself are all available to you or your colleague, as well as Beck Haist, Student Counselor. Remember QMed Help, the red button available on MedTech.

 

So there you have my list. Happy to receive revisions, additions or comments from readers. Final word to our students – enjoy. Clerkship is a time to grow and learn.

 

Anthony J. Sanfilippo, MD, FRCP(C)

Associate Dean,

Undergraduate Medical Education

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6th annual Medical Student Research Showcase

By Drs. Heather Murray & Melanie Walker

This year the School of Medicine is proud to invite you to the 6th annual Medical Student Research Showcase on Wednesday September 20th.

This event celebrates the research achievements of our undergraduate medical students, with both posters and an oral plenary session featuring research performed by students while they have been enrolled in medical school. All students who received summer studentship research funding through the School of Medicine in 2017 will be presenting their work, as well as many other research initiatives. The posters will be displayed in the David Walker atrium of the School of Medicine building from 8am until 5pm, with the students standing at their posters answering questions between 10:30 and noon.

The oral plenary features the top research projects selected by a panel of faculty judges, and will run in room 132A from noon until 1:30pm on September 20th, immediately following the poster session Q&A.

This year’s faculty judges included:

Dr. Yuka Asai

Dr. Jennifer Flemming

Dr. Katrina Gee

Dr. David Good

Dr. Dianne Groll

Dr. Paula James

Dr. Robert Reid

Dr. Prameet Sheth

Dr. Graeme Smith

Dr. Tan Towheed

Dr. Andrea Winthrop

We are very grateful to these faculty members for evaluating our oral plenary applicants this year.

The three students who have been selected for the oral plenary session, and the titles of their research presentations and faculty supervisor names are listed below. Each of these three students will receive The Albert Clark Award for Medical Student Research Excellence.

Gregory Hawley – Plasminogen depletion following severe burn injury

Jeffrey Mah – Survival following Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS) in Patients with Cirrhosis: A Population-based Study

Sean Tom – ETS1 transcription factor-mediated upregulation of microRNA-31 controls cardiac fibrogenesis in human atrial fibrillation.

Please set aside some time to attend the Medical Student Research Showcase on September 20th. The students will appreciate your interest and support, and you will be amazed at what they have been able to achieve.

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Names matter

What’s in a name? That which we call a rose

By any other name would smell as sweet.

 So mused the ill-fated heroine in Romeo and Juliet, about her equally ill-fated love.

In medicine and in teaching, however, names can mean a lot.

The late Dr. Kate Granger of the United Kingdom was one of the strongest advocates for using names with her #hellomynameis campaign – launched while she lived with terminal cancer. As explained in a BBC article following her death in July 2016, the campaign “encouraged healthcare staff to introduce themselves to patients.”

“A by-product of her own experiences of hospital in August 2013, it grew out of the feelings of unimportance she experienced when the doctor who informed her that her cancer had spread did not introduce himself,” the BBC wrote. Granger had explained it this way: “It’s the first thing you are taught in medical school, that when you approach a patient you say your name, your role and what you are going to do. This missing link made me feel like I did not really matter, that these people weren’t bothered who I was. I ended up at times feeling like I was just a diseased body in a hospital bed.”

Learning and using names is important for both teachers and students, long before they reach patients’ hospital beds. For this reason, we emphasize the importance of names in our UGME classrooms and clinical skills environments, too.

“Learning students’ names signals your interest in their performance and encourages student motivation and class participation,” writes Barbara Gross Davis in Tools for Teaching. “Even if you can’t learn everyone’s name, students appreciate your making the effort.”

One of the strategies of learning students names that Gross Davis (and others) suggests is one we’ve adopted at Queen’s UG: having students use name tent cards in the classrooms. This was adopted for two reasons, Dr. Lindsay Davidson, Director of Teaching, Learning, and Integration explains.

“It’s because we start developing professional identity from Day 1, and being a doctor means introducing who you are.”

“And because it helps build relationships,” she adds. “Student-student but also teacher-student—teachers can respond to students as individuals with names not ‘the guy in the ball cap’.”

“We expect all medical students to wear identification nametags for all clinical skills sessions, both in-house and when at health facilities,” says Clinical Skills Director Dr. Cherie Jones. She notes that the Year 1 students don’t have these on Day 1 as these are provided by KGH. “We use paper ones until they are done!” Once the official badges are available, they must be worn.

And it’s not just for students: clinical skills tutors are expected to wear their ID that they use in their clinical settings.

And for all those (like me) who’ve become accustomed to wearing an ID card on a lanyard or on a hip-level clip: IDs are to be worn on the lapel of the jacket—where they can best be seen

“Name tags are important in clinical skills sessions because the Standardized Patients (SPs) and Volunteer Patients (VPs), like to know the names of the students and tutors they are working with and don’t always understand or hear the name when the student introduces themselves,” Dr. Jones explains.

The Clinical Skills policy mimics the name-badge policies at the hospitals in Kingston. “Name tags in clinical settings like KGH are mandatory for anyone interacting with patients, staff, even with visitors,” Dr. Jones points out.

“Not only is it policy in the hospital, but patients like being able to read anyone’s name – not just the students’,” adds Kathy Bowes, Clinical Skills Coordinator.

So, remember your ID badge, use your name tent cards in the classrooms, use people’s names. And me, I’ll be pinning my hospital ID badge in the right place the next time I’m heading over to KGH for a meeting.

Because names matter. To everyone.

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Welcoming Queen’s Meds 2021

The academic cycle is such that, for a few short weeks each summer, our student population reduces by a quarter. Last May, we graduated and congratulated the class of Meds 2017, who have now gone on to engage the next phase their careers. This week, our school continues its cycle of annual renewal, welcoming another eager and very promising group of aspiring physicians, the class of Meds 2021.

 

Picture by Lars Hagberg of incoming med students for Queen’s School of Medicine.

 

A few facts about our new colleagues:

They were selected from a pool of 4752 highly qualified students who submitted applications last fall.

Their average age is 23 with a range of 19 to 34 years.  Fifty-eight percent are women. They hail from no fewer than 39 communities across Canada, including; Ajax, Aurora, Bancroft, Brampton, Brantford, Burnaby, Calgary, Deseronto, Dunnville, Edmonton, Etobicoke, Guelph, Hamilton, Kelowna, Kingston, Maple, Markham, Milton, Mississauga, North Bay, North Saanich, North Vancouver, North York, Oakville, Orillia, Orleans, Oshawa, Ottawa, Peterborough, Pickering, Pointe Aux Roches, Richmond Hill, Scarborough, Severn, Surrey, Thornhill, Toronto, Vancouver and Vaughn.

Eighty-four of our new students have completed an Undergraduate degree, and twenty-nine have postgraduate degrees, including seven PhDs. The universities they have attended and degree programs are listed below:

Universities of Undergraduate Studies

Carleton University
McGill University
McMaster University
Novosilbirsk State University
Queen’s University
Ryerson University
Simon Fraser University
Trent University
Trinity Western
University of British Columbia
University of Calgary
University of Cambridge
University of Guelph
University of Ottawa
University of Toronto
University of Waterloo
Vassar College
Western University
York University

 

Undergraduate Degree Majors

Biochemistry
Biology
Biomedical Science
Business Administration
Chemical Biology
Chemical Engineering
Cognitive Science
Electrical Engineering
English
French Studies
Gender Studies
Global Development
Health Science
Integrated Science
Kinesiology
Life Science
Medical Science
Neuroscience
Nursing
Physiology
Psychology

 

An academically diverse and very qualified group, to be sure.  Last week, they undertook a variety of orientation activities organized by both faculty and their upper year colleagues.

On their first day, they were called upon to demonstrate commitment to their studies, their profession and their future patients.  They were assured that they will have a voice within our school and be treated with the same respect they are expected to provide each other, their faculty and all patients and volunteers they encounter through their medical school careers.  At that first session, they were welcomed by Dean Reznick who challenged them to be restless in the pursuit of their goals and the betterment of our society and shared with them a message from his favourite poet and recent Nobel Laueate Bob Dylan. Mr. Cale Templeton, Asesculapian Society President, welcomed them on behalf of their upper year colleagues, and Dr. Rachel Rooney provided them an introduction to fundamental concepts of medical professionalism.

Over the course of the week, they met curricular leaders who will particularly involved in their first year, including Dr. Michelle Gibson (Year 1 Director) and Dr. Cherie Jones (Clinical Skills Director). They were also introduced to Dr. Renee Fitzpatrick (Director of Student Affairs) and our excellent learner support team, including Drs. Martin Ten Hove, Jason Franklin, Kelly Howse, Susan Haley, Josh Lakoff, Craig Goldie and Erin Beattie, who oriented them to the Learner Wellness, Career Counseling and Academic Support services that will be provided throughout their years with us. They met members of our superb administrative and educational support teams led by Jacqueline Findlay, Jennifer Saunders, Sheila Pinchin, Amanda Consack, and first year Curricular Coordinator Corinne Bochsma.

Dr. Susan Moffatt organized and coordinated the very popular and much appreciated “Pearls of Wisdom” session, where fourth year students nominate and introduce faculty members who have been particularly impactful in their education, and invite them to pass on a few words of advice to the new students. This year, Drs. Erin Beattie, Bob Connelly, Filip Gilic, Robyn Houlden, Vickie Martin, Alex Menard, Laura Milne, Heather Murray, Cliff Rice and Ruth Wilson were selected for this honour.

On Friday, the practical aspects of curriculum, expectations of conduct and promotions were explained by Drs. Michelle Gibson.

Their Meds 2020 upper year colleagues welcomed them with a number of formal and not-so-formal events. These included sessions intended to promote an inclusive learning environment, as well as orientations to Queen’s and Kingston, introductions to the mentorship program, and a variety of evening social events which, judging by appearances the next morning, were much enjoyed.

For all these arrangements, flawlessly coordinated, I’m very grateful to Rebecca Jozsa, our Admissions Officer.

I invite you to join me in welcoming these new members of our school and medical community.

 

Anthony J. Sanfilippo, MD, FRCP(C)

Associate Dean,

Undergraduate Medical Education

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Welcoming Queen’s Meds 2021

The academic cycle is such that, for a few short weeks each summer, our student population reduces by a quarter. Last May, we graduated and congratulated the class of Meds 2017, who have now gone on to engage the next phase their careers. This week, our school continues its cycle of annual renewal, welcoming another eager and very promising group of aspiring physicians, the class of Meds 2021.

 

Picture by Lars Hagberg of incoming med students for Queen’s School of Medicine.

 

A few facts about our new colleagues:

They were selected from a pool of 4752 highly qualified students who submitted applications last fall.

Their average age is 23 with a range of 19 to 34 years.  Fifty-eight percent are women. They hail from no fewer than 39 communities across Canada, including; Ajax, Aurora, Bancroft, Brampton, Brantford, Burnaby, Calgary, Deseronto, Dunnville, Edmonton, Etobicoke, Guelph, Hamilton, Kelowna, Kingston, Maple, Markham, Milton, Mississauga, North Bay, North Saanich, North Vancouver, North York, Oakville, Orillia, Orleans, Oshawa, Ottawa, Peterborough, Pickering, Pointe Aux Roches, Richmond Hill, Scarborough, Severn, Surrey, Thornhill, Toronto, Vancouver and Vaughn.

Eighty-four of our new students have completed an Undergraduate degree, and twenty-nine have postgraduate degrees, including seven PhDs. The universities they have attended and degree programs are listed below:

Universities of Undergraduate Studies

Carleton University
McGill University
McMaster University
Novosilbirsk State University
Queen’s University
Ryerson University
Simon Fraser University
Trent University
Trinity Western
University of British Columbia
University of Calgary
University of Cambridge
University of Guelph
University of Ottawa
University of Toronto
University of Waterloo
Vassar College
Western University
York University

 

Undergraduate Degree Majors

Biochemistry
Biology
Biomedical Science
Business Administration
Chemical Biology
Chemical Engineering
Cognitive Science
Electrical Engineering
English
French Studies
Gender Studies
Global Development
Health Science
Integrated Science
Kinesiology
Life Science
Medical Science
Neuroscience
Nursing
Physiology
Psychology

 

An academically diverse and very qualified group, to be sure.  Last week, they undertook a variety of orientation activities organized by both faculty and their upper year colleagues.

On their first day, they were called upon to demonstrate commitment to their studies, their profession and their future patients.  They were assured that they will have a voice within our school and be treated with the same respect they are expected to provide each other, their faculty and all patients and volunteers they encounter through their medical school careers.  At that first session, they were welcomed by Dean Reznick who challenged them to be restless in the pursuit of their goals and the betterment of our society and shared with them a message from his favourite poet and recent Nobel Laueate Bob Dylan. Mr. Cale Templeton, Asesculapian Society President, welcomed them on behalf of their upper year colleagues, and Dr. Rachel Rooney provided them an introduction to fundamental concepts of medical professionalism.

Over the course of the week, they met curricular leaders who will particularly involved in their first year, including Dr. Michelle Gibson (Year 1 Director) and Dr. Cherie Jones (Clinical Skills Director). They were also introduced to Dr. Renee Fitzpatrick (Director of Student Affairs) and our excellent learner support team, including Drs. Martin Ten Hove, Jason Franklin, Kelly Howse, Susan Haley, Josh Lakoff, Craig Goldie and Erin Beattie, who oriented them to the Learner Wellness, Career Counseling and Academic Support services that will be provided throughout their years with us. They met members of our superb administrative and educational support teams led by Jacqueline Findlay, Jennifer Saunders, Sheila Pinchin, Amanda Consack, and first year Curricular Coordinator Corinne Bochsma.

Dr. Susan Moffatt organized and coordinated the very popular and much appreciated “Pearls of Wisdom” session, where fourth year students nominate and introduce faculty members who have been particularly impactful in their education, and invite them to pass on a few words of advice to the new students. This year, Drs. Erin Beattie, Bob Connelly, Filip Gilic, Robyn Houlden, Vickie Martin, Alex Menard, Laura Milne, Heather Murray, Cliff Rice and Ruth Wilson were selected for this honour.

On Friday, the practical aspects of curriculum, expectations of conduct and promotions were explained by Drs. Michelle Gibson.

Their Meds 2020 upper year colleagues welcomed them with a number of formal and not-so-formal events. These included sessions intended to promote an inclusive learning environment, as well as orientations to Queen’s and Kingston, introductions to the mentorship program, and a variety of evening social events which, judging by appearances the next morning, were much enjoyed.

For all these arrangements, flawlessly coordinated, I’m very grateful to Rebecca Jozsa, our Admissions Officer.

I invite you to join me in welcoming these new members of our school and medical community.

 

Anthony J. Sanfilippo, MD, FRCP(C)

Associate Dean,

Undergraduate Medical Education

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Anatomy studies begin with focus on respect

Each September, first year students in the Queen’s Undergraduate Medical program quietly begin their studies in anatomy with a service acknowledging the donation of bodies that will be used in the lab assignments.

This year the short service will be held on Tuesday, September 5 at 3 p.m. in room 032 of the Medical Building, following the introduction to the Human Structure & Function course.

The course co-directors, Les MacKenzie, Stephen Pang, and Allan Baer will be joined by Queen’s Chaplain Kate Johnson to lead the program.

The session emphasizes respect and professionalism. “This is the first approach to professionalism,” MacKenzie explained in an interview. “The purpose of the donations is for this study and we have to respect that.”

“Respect not just for the bodies that have been donated, but for the families who have donated them,” he added.

Queen’s is one of a decreasing number of medical schools that still uses human cadavers in anatomy courses. According to a 2016 article in National Geographic, “half of Canadian medical schools have cut back on using cadavers, relying instead on new technology to make teaching basic anatomy more efficient.”

While there is definitely a place for technology, MacKenzie acknowledged, there’s also a strong argument for using donated human bodies. He pointed out, for example, that the many variations of “normal” are not experienced if everyone is using the same computer simulated program. It’s a privilege to have this learning experience, MacKenzie noted, and the students recognize this.

The emphasis on respect is tied to one of the objectives from the Queen’s UGME Competency Framework (Professional 1.1a) which notes students will “Identify honesty, integrity, commitment, dependability, compassion, respect, confidentiality and altruism in clinical practice and apply these concepts in learning, medical and professional encounters.” For the Human Structure and Function course, this is further annotated to explain that students will: “Consistently demonstrate compassion and respect for those who have donated their bodies to the medical school for use by students studying anatomy.”

“I truly believe the point does get across,” MacKenzie said. “Our medical students really get the message, there’s no horseplay. We have zero tolerance of misbehaving.”

Queen’s Chaplain Kate Johnson, who has led the opening service in recent years, takes the opportunity to emphasize the students’ own humanity and to remind them to keep in touch with it.

“Historically, medical students were at risk of a ‘super human’ culture of medicine,” Johnson said. “Now, with technological advances, there’s the danger of taking the humanity out of medicine. The anatomy lab is one place to keep the humanity.”

Johnson also reminds students they are starting on a pathway to a position of trust.

“You’re not just technically excellent, but your professional conduct is to be worthy of trust,” she noted at last year’s service. “It’s appropriate then that this part of your education starts with the bodies of people whose last wish was to entrust their physical remains to you in order that you can be fully trained in your profession,” she said. “Even more, their surviving family members have made what is often a huge decision to trust you by following through on their deceased loved ones’ wishes.

Tuesday’s service is open to all members of the Queen’s community. “It would be great if it was standing room only,” MacKenzie said.


Each spring features a more formal, graveside burial service at the Queen’s University plot at Cataraqui Cemetery which is attended by family, friends, and members of the Queen’s community. Details on this service will be available in the spring.

For more on the Human Body Donor Program at Queen’s see A body of medical knowledge in the Queen’s Alumni Review 2017 Issue 2

For information on procedures to donate, see the Queen’s Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences Human Body Donor Program web page.

 

 

 

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Hope Amidst the Chaos of Charlottesville

Archbishop Desmond Tutu has defined hope as “being able to see that there is light despite all the darkness”.

It is difficult to find such light amid the darkness of the recent events in Charlottesville and their aftermath.

But such dark times are certainly not unprecedented in the history of our American neighbours.

Two hundred and fifty-five years ago, 56 rebellious colonists courageously broke their allegiance with a powerful monarch who they felt had been treating them unjustly. In what was an act of treason, they declared and justified their independence with the following words:

“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.”

Fewer than ninety years later, the nation that emerged from that rebellion found itself engaged in a highly destructive civil war, caused largely by a failure to achieve those founding principles. In a brief but highly influential speech their leader at the time, Abraham Lincoln, justified the struggle and sacrifice by re-affirming those founding principles. He spoke of a nation “conceived in liberty and dedicated tothe proposition that all men are created equal”,and vowed that his nation would have “a new birth of freedom” ensuring that “government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”

About a hundred years later, that same nation found itself again engaged in civil unrest arising from unresolved racial tensions and failed attempts to finally achieve its founding ideals. On a hot August day, standing at the base of a memorial dedicated to the very same President Lincoln, the Reverend Martin Luther King said:

“I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia, the sons of former slaves and sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood”

In each case, the authors of these words were not expressing the realities of their times. Far from it. Rather they were giving eloquent expression to what they believed to be the values to which their nation, and any truly just society, should strive. They were expressing an aspiration, which faithful believers would contend, should remain in the collective consciousness, guiding decisions to continually approach the goal of full equality. Put simply, they were expressing hope.

This time, there is no soaring, inspirational eloquence recalling higher ideals and keeping hope alive. In fact, the actions and words of the current leadership evoke quite the opposite. Many, both within and without the borders of the United States, must be wondering whether the great American experiment in democracy and individual freedom has finally “perished from the earth”? Was the goal expressed in the original declaration (ironically penned by the most famous former citizen of Charlottesville) and re-affirmed so many times over the years, simply too much to expect of any group of mortal, flawed people. Where’s the hope?

For me, at least, hope was re-kindled in a single image captured by an amateur photographer with her cellphone, It depicts a Charlottesville police officer, himself African-American, standing guard at a barricade maintaining order despite the actions of those “protestors” whose overtly racist attitudes would bring harm to him and those closest to him.

A post shared by Jill Mumie (@lil_mooms) on

Photo by Jill Mumie

The officer, Darius Nash, later wrote in response to his unexpected notoriety:

“I don’t feel like I’m a hero for it…I swore to protect my city and that’s what I was there to do. I don’t think it makes me a hero, just doing what I believe in.”1

At the same time that this police officer was doing what he believed in, his president and Commander-in-Chief was reluctant to condemn the actions of the other folks in this image and was finding fault in those who challenged them.

Who, of these two, is truly representative of today’s America? One would normally presume that the words and actions of the elected leader of a free people would represent the collective values of that nation. Hope for continuation of the American dream, it would seem, rests on whether the attitudes of this great people are best and most accurately expressed by its current president, or by the words and actions of a Charlottesville police officer.

I, for one, chose to believe, or hope, it’s the policeman. Like many Canadians, I follow American history and events closely. I know and count as friends (and even family members) many Americans. I have, for a time, lived among them. I have found that the vast majority of Americans are fair, decent and tolerant people. They are candid and pragmatic in addressing their social issues. They are proud of their nation and believe in its founding principles. They have been through remarkably difficult challenges and their political structures, although imperfect, have proven resilient under both internal and external threat. Ultimately, they are not a people to stand idly by and watch their values corrupted.

And we’re already seeing signs of that resolve.

Former presidents GHW Bush, GW Bush2 and Obama3 have all issued statements condemning bigotry and re-affirming the principles of equality – astounding gestures that attempt to fill the moral vacuum left by their successor.

Prominent business leaders, such as Merck CEO Kenneth Frazier, have resigned from influential presidential advisory panels4, risking loss of influence and the ire of the standing president.

Many athletes and celebrities have refused honours and invitations to the White House in protest5.

Most recently, more enlightened forces seem to be emerging in the White House itself, resulting in the firing of Steve Bannon, Chief strategist and former election campaign chair who was a driving force in this administration’s nationalistic, anti-globalization and anti-environmental agenda6. Mr. Bannon, one might recall, was formerly executive chairman of Breitbart News, which promoted the efforts and collaboration of “alt-right” groups such as neo-Nazis7.

So perhaps the tide is beginning to turn. Governments are like huge ocean-going vessels, built for the long voyage and therefore slow to adjust course.

In the words of Mr. Bannon, related to the Weekly Standard after his firing, “The Trump presidency that we fought for and won, is over”8.

Let’s hope that he’s at least right about that.

Anthony J. Sanfilippo, MD, FRCP(C)
Associate Dean,
Undergraduate Medical Education

  1. http://time.com/4899668/charlottesville-virginia-protest-officer-kkk-photo/
  2. http://time.com/4903103/george-bush-president-statement-hatred-charlottesville/
  3. https://www.techspot.com/news/70602-obama-statement-response-charlottesville-protest-now-most-liked.html
  4. http://money.mlive.com/dynamic/stories/U/US_TRUMP_MERCK_CEO?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2017-08-14-22-01-01
  5. http://www.smh.com.au/world/trump-to-skip-kennedy-centre-honours-ceremony-20170819-gy01v5.html
  6. Globe and Mail, Aug 19, 2017
  7. http://www.newstatesman.com/world/2017/03/alt-right-leninist
  8. http://www.weeklystandard.com/bannon-the-trump-presidency-that-we-fought-for-and-won-is-over./article/2009355

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Curriculum Committee Information – May 24, 2017 & June 22, 2017

Faculty and staff interested in attending Curriculum Committee meetings should contact the Committee Secretary, Candace Miller (umecc@queensu.ca), for information relating to agenda items and meeting schedules.

A meeting of the Curriculum Committee was held on May 24, 2017.  To review the topics discussed at this meeting, please click HERE to view the agenda.

The Curriculum Committee held its Annual Curricular Review Retreat on June 22, 2017. To review the topics discussed at this Retreat, please click HERE to view the agenda.

Faculty interested in reviewing the minutes of the May meeting and Annual Curricular Review Retreat can click HERE to be taken to the Curriculum Committee’s page located on the Faculty Resources Community of MEdTech Central.

Those who are directly impacted by any decisions made by the Curriculum Committee have been notified via email.

Students interested in the outcome of a decision or discussion are welcome to contact the Aesculapian Society’s Vice President, Academic, Kate Rath-Wilson at vpacademic@qmed.ca.

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Curriculum Committee Information – May 24, 2017 & June 22, 2017

Faculty and staff interested in attending Curriculum Committee meetings should contact the Committee Secretary, Candace Miller (umecc@queensu.ca), for information relating to agenda items and meeting schedules.

A meeting of the Curriculum Committee was held on May 24, 2017.  To review the topics discussed at this meeting, please click HERE to view the agenda.

The Curriculum Committee held its Annual Curricular Review Retreat on June 22, 2017. To review the topics discussed at this Retreat, please click HERE to view the agenda.

Faculty interested in reviewing the minutes of the May meeting and Annual Curricular Review Retreat can click HERE to be taken to the Curriculum Committee’s page located on the Faculty Resources Community of MEdTech Central.

Those who are directly impacted by any decisions made by the Curriculum Committee have been notified via email.

Students interested in the outcome of a decision or discussion are welcome to contact the Aesculapian Society’s Vice President, Academic, Kate Rath-Wilson at vpacademic@qmed.ca.

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