Third annual History of Medicine Week starts April 23

The What Happened In Medicine (WHIM) Historical Society is proud to host the third annual History of Medicine Week! This year’s theme is inspired by Dr. Duffin’s Heroes & Villains assignment, where students must grapple with some controversial characters in our history. Students, Faculty, and Community members are all warmly welcomed to attend any and all events! Please join us during the week of April 23rd for four exciting events:

Museum of Healthcare Showcase 

Monday, April 23rd (8:30AM – 3:00PM)
Grande Corridor, New Medical Building, 15 Arch St.

Hero or Villain? You be the judge! Wander through the Grand Corridor of the New Medical Building and enjoy the showcase curated by the Museum of Healthcare. At your leisure, take a look at artifacts of some of history’s biggest medical heroes and villains.

Panel Discussion

Tuesday, April 24th (5:30PM – 7:30PM) 
132A, New Medical Building, 15 Arch St.
Don’t miss out on our most controversial event of the week! After a half hour period to gather refreshments and FREE food, a panel, moderated by the incredible Dr. Jenna Healey, resident Queen’s Hannah Chair of the History of Medicine, will question the basis for a designation of hero or villain. The panel will begin with Dr. Jaclyn Duffin, haematologist, historian, and past Hannah Chair of the History of Medicine, describing why and how she invented the Heroes and Villains project as an introduction both to history in medicine and to information literacy — with some of its triumphs and disasters. Next, Dr. Allison Morehead, Associate Professor and Graduate Coordinator of Art History at Queen’s University, will talk about Florence Nightingale and the “incursion” of women into the “fraternity” of medicine in the 19th and 20th centuries, as well as the ways in which historical accounts of Nightingale heroicize (or angelicize!) her to the exclusion of other figures in the history of nursing, such as Mary Seacole. Closing the panel is Edward Thomas, PhD candidate in Cultural Studies at Queen’s, will discuss his research examining Queen’s barring of black medical students between 1918 and 1964 in regards to how institutional narratives shape organizational memory and culture. 

Open Mic Night 

Wednesday, April 25th (7:00PM – 9:30PM)
The Grad Club, 162 Barrie St
Need an outlet for your historical arguments? Ready to re-enact your heroes and villain assignment? Want some free beer and endless historical entertainment? Come out to the Heroes & Villains: Open Mic Night! A relaxing event, some fantastic entertainment, and a wonderful evening spent with your Queen’s peers, what more can you ask for?!

Movie Night: History of Kingston Psychiatric Hospital

Thursday, April 26th (5:30PM – 7:30PM) 
032A, New Medical Building, 15 Arch St.

Don’t miss out on this weeks closing event! We will be screening the film “The History of KPH” by Queen’s Film Studies’ own Janice Belanger. Come to learn more about the Kingston Psychiatric Hospital, and have a relaxing end to this jam-packed week!

 

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Actors, musicians & dancers?? QMed is gearing up for the 48th annual Medical Variety Night!

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By Edrea Khong, MVN co-director

It’s that time of year again! Medical Variety Night (MVN) is the School of Medicine’s annual charity variety show featuring UGME student performers from across all four years of training. This year’s theme, So You Think You Can Match, was selected by popular vote amongst the students and is a spin on the popular television show, So You Think You Can Dance. The theme may be particularly apropos yet contentious right now, given the increasing difficulties surrounding the CaRMS match. However, while the show is sure to feature references to this, it certainly is not the focus. The spotlight will remain on the performers, and the show aims to celebrate all that is Queen’s Medicine.

Wandering the halls of the School of Medicine during after-class hours, one may be treated to a glimpse of the beautiful madness that is MVN preparation. From large group dance rehearsals for hip-hop, contemporary (new this year!), or Bollywood, to table-reads and short filming sequences for class skits, the students have been working tirelessly to perfect their acts for the show. The acts seem to get bigger and more elaborate each year, and this year’s line-up surely will not disappoint!

As always, details about the act set list are being kept tightly under wraps, but showgoers can be assured that there will be a great variety with something for

MVN 2018 Directors Edrea Khong, Daisy Liu, Emily Wilkerson, & Charlotte Coleman

everyone. In addition, although there will be some “medical culture”-styled humour, the show is designed to be accessible by and entertaining for all. In the past, the show has been very well attended by people outside of the “Medicine Bubble™” to rave reviews.

Outside of the performers, there are many others who have been hard at work on the show, such as the promotions, tech, and backstage crews already doing vital behind-the-scenes work in preparation. In addition, Edrea Khong and Daisy Liu (2020s) have been joined this year by Charlotte Coleman and Emily Wilkerson (2021s) as the MVN 2018 Directors. The four have spent countless hours since mid-September organizing and preparing for the show. With the two-week countdown now underway, they are hard at work ensuring the show runs as smoothly as possible. During the show week, many more students will also lend a hand as bakers, ushers, ticket takers, raffle sellers, and much more. MVN is a project of love, dedication, and talent from all of QMed.

MVN 2018 Emcees Roya Abdmoulaie & Lauren Mak

All proceeds from this year’s show are going to Kingston Interval House, an organization committed to supporting women, children, and youth experiencing violence and working collaboratively with the community to eliminate all forms of violence and oppression. While great strides have been made worldwide towards establishing greater equality especially in these past few months, there is still much to be done and services like these are so vital. The decision to support Kingston Interval House feels very apt. In addition to ticket sales, MVN depends on the generosity of the Kingston community and Queen’s faculty. Raffle prizes featuring local Kingston businesses and a bake sale featuring QMed culinary talent can be found at the shows. Donations are also being accepted on the MVN website, with donations of $50 or greater receiving a tax receipt.

MVN 2018 takes place on April 6th and 7th at Duncan McArthur Hall (511 Union St.), with doors opening at 6:30PM and the show starting at 7:00PM both evenings. Tickets can be purchased for $13 on the MVN website, or for $15 at the door.

Get excited for a fantastic evening of performances celebrating another year of Queen’s Medicine! Gather your family and friends and purchase your tickets to MVN 2018 today. Looking forward to seeing you at the show!

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Singers, dancers, musicians & a dean: It’s MVN!

It’s Medical Variety Night (MVN) time of year at the School of Medicine and UGME students have been putting in long hours of practice and preparation. And they’re not the only ones – this year the show includes a feature performance by Faculty of Health Sciences Dean Richard Reznick.

Co-director Manisha Tilak (2019) says you’ll have to show up to see the Dean’s act – no other information is being shared. “He’s actually in an act, though, it’s not just that he’ll be attending,” she adds.

Tilak and co-directors Andrew McNaughton (2019), Edrea Khong (2020) and Daisy Liu (2020) have been hard at work since September to ensure the success of this year’s show. This year’s theme is The Phantom of the Operation.

Dancers in the now-traditional Bollywood number have been in rehearsal since November. Auditions for the other acts were held around the same time. There will be music solos, duos and trios as well as the class skits. Other dance numbers will feature Hip hop and Swing.

While the show may have a few ‘culture of medicine’ in-jokes, it’s designed to be interesting and entertaining for everyone.

This is the 47th incarnation of the Medical Variety Night, which benefits local charities. This year, proceeds are being donated to Almost Home, which provides accommodations for families with children receiving medical treatment at Kingston area hospitals.

“The most fun part comes the night of the show when you see all the hard work pay off and everyone enjoying themselves,” Tilak noted. Also, the tally at the end of the night: “When we’re able to send a good donation to the Almost Home.”

The show will take place April 7 and 8 at Duncan McArthur Hall, 511 Union Street, Kingston. Doors open at 7 p.m. Tickets are available online (buy them here: https://mvn2017.squarespace.com) and at the door.

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Singers, dancers, musicians & a dean: It’s MVN!

It’s Medical Variety Night (MVN) time of year at the School of Medicine and UGME students have been putting in long hours of practice and preparation. And they’re not the only ones – this year the show includes a feature performance by Faculty of Health Sciences Dean Richard Reznick.

Co-director Manisha Tilak (2019) says you’ll have to show up to see the Dean’s act – no other information is being shared. “He’s actually in an act, though, it’s not just that he’ll be attending,” she adds.

Tilak and co-directors Andrew McNaughton (2019), Edrea Khong (2020) and Daisy Liu (2020) have been hard at work since September to ensure the success of this year’s show. This year’s theme is The Phantom of the Operation.

Dancers in the now-traditional Bollywood number have been in rehearsal since November. Auditions for the other acts were held around the same time. There will be music solos, duos and trios as well as the class skits. Other dance numbers will feature Hip hop and Swing.

While the show may have a few ‘culture of medicine’ in-jokes, it’s designed to be interesting and entertaining for everyone.

This is the 47th incarnation of the Medical Variety Night, which benefits local charities. This year, proceeds are being donated to Almost Home, which provides accommodations for families with children receiving medical treatment at Kingston area hospitals.

“The most fun part comes the night of the show when you see all the hard work pay off and everyone enjoying themselves,” Tilak noted. Also, the tally at the end of the night: “When we’re able to send a good donation to the Almost Home.”

The show will take place April 7 and 8 at Duncan McArthur Hall, 511 Union Street, Kingston. Doors open at 7 p.m. Tickets are available online (buy them here: https://mvn2017.squarespace.com) and at the door.

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Medical grad receives Queen’s University Agnes Benidickson Tricolour Award

One of the highlights at Convocation on May 21 was the admission of one of the Meds Class of 2015 to the Queen’s University Tricolour Society.

Benjamin Frid was admitted to the Society through the Agnes Benidickson Tricolour Award—the highest honour given to a Queen’s student for non-academic, non-athletic activities. Recipients are chosen by their fellow students.

For Frid, it had been a bit of a wait to be inducted into the Tricolour Society: He was actually nominated and accepted for the award in 2012-2013, but it is presented upon graduation.

The award—named after Dr. Agnes Benidickson, Chancellor of Queen’s University from 1980 to 1996—is presented in recognition for valuable and distinguished service of outstanding individuals to the University. According to the Tricolour website, “such service may have been confined to a single field, or it may have taken the form of a significant contribution over a wide range of activities.” For Frid, his contributions definitely spanned a range of activities. Among those contributions included in the citation read at convocation were:

  • He founded the Kingston chapter of Making Waves, a student-run organization that provides affordable private swimming lessons for children with disabilities
  • He was Aesculapian Society president
  • He formed of a wellness committee to address mental health issues for medical students
  • He was founder and president of the Health Care Management Interest Group, a team involved with addressing the deficit in financial literacy that many physicians today are burdened with

“Ben’s spirited inclusive, and enthusiastic approach to life has influenced the lives of innumerous students and the greater Kingston community for the better,” the citation said.

Frid’s journey to this award actually began with his first undergraduate degree where he had what he describes as “limited extra-curricular involvement.”

“It left me feeling that I had really missed out on a lot of interesting and important opportunities,” he wrote in an email interview. “I think university is the perfect time to start becoming more involved. You are surrounded by such energetic people and a university that wants to help students do great things, I really think it’s the best time in person’s life to try and make a difference and improve the lives of those around them.”

Frid got more involved at the Telfer School of Business at the University of Ottawa where he started the Ottawa Making Waves chapter, was a teaching assistant and began taking leadership courses. This new habit of involvement continued when he came to Queen’s School of Medicine.

Ben Frid
Ben Frid immediately after Convocation. (Photographs courtesy of Ben Frid’s family)

“At Queen’s, I was heavily involved in student government through our class council, our Aesculapian Society, and the Canadian Federation of Medical Students (in addition to lots of other groups and projects), but by far my favourite was Making Waves!”

Frid admits that balancing extra-curricular activities with medical school studies wasn’t always easy. “I had to learn some new skills and become a more organized person,” he said. “Fortunately, Queen’s faculty are very supportive of students who want to be involved,” he added.

“I think extra-curriculars are an important component of mindfulness,” he pointed out. “Just like eating well and exercising regularly, finding consistent positive and rewarding experiences are a key part of managing the heavy workload of medical school.”

“Even though it can create a bit of a time crunch, I think I was a far better medical student for the extra responsibilities I took on.”

“The beginning of medical school should not be the end of your hobbies and passions,” Frid said when asked for advice for the incoming Class of 2019. “Grow them! Pursue what you have loved to do, and take advantage of all the new experiences that will soon present themselves. Your fellow medical students are every bit as passionate as you are, and together you can do incredible things.”

Frid noted that he is “inspired by the people I have had the privilege of working for,” and pointed to one example from the early days of Making Waves in Kingston.

“I remember wondering how long it would take for instructors and their kids to bond, and for us to start seeing evidence of value we were generating for the community,” he said. “While setting up for just the second lesson, I remember watching one of our kids recognizing his instructor in the aquatic centre lobby, his eyes opening wide as could be, and him launching into a full speed sprint with arms outstretched to go hug his instructor he had only met one week before.  I knew then that we had happened upon something special and that memory has stayed with me.”

Frid will begin his Family Medicine residency in July here at Queen’s. As he moves on to the post-graduate program, he’s left Making Waves in good hands. “The medical students in the classes of 2017 and 2018 are doing an incredible job of growing Making Waves from where we left off, and are to be commended for their hard work and successes,” he said. “Making Waves Kingston is a Queen’s-wide initiative with key leadership from the Queen’s School of Medicine, and it is thriving under its new leadership.”

According to the Society’s web page, Frid is the first medical student to receive the Tricolour since Ahmed Kayssi (Meds2009) in 2005-2006. Because of this, Frid was “particularly proud to be attracting some attention to the amazing things Queen’s Medical students have been doing year in and year out.”

Frid said he felt very honoured to receive the award and was quick to point out that he had much support along the way: “None of the projects I was involved in were individual, so I feel very grateful to the QMed faculty and students, particularly my classmates in the Class of 2015, that helped those projects be successful.”

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Bollywood, gnomes and time travel, oh my!— 45th Annual Medical Variety Night promises an entertaining evening

Anyone wandering through the second floor of the Medical Building after hours some days this term could be forgiven for wondering if they’d accidentally ended up in a dance studio instead of a medical school.

What was actually happening was rehearsal for one of the dance numbers for this year’s Medical Variety Night (MVN). The show takes place Friday, April 10 and Saturday, April 11 at 7 p.m. (doors open at 6:30 p.m.) at Duncan McArthur Auditorium at 511 Union Street West and will be hosted by Emily Kerr (MEDS2017) and Alessia Gallipoli (MEDS2017).

I set out to find out more about what’s in store at the 45th edition of MVN, “House of CaRMS” by emailing this year’s co-directors: Beverly Guan (MEDS2017), Jimin Lee (MEDS2017), Jordan Sugarman (MEDS2018) and Nathan Terrana (MEDS2018).

This year’s theme of “House of CaRMS” was selected by popular vote, inspired by the American political drama series, “House of Cards.”

“The television series features scheming, power-hungry characters doing everything it takes to climb the ladder of success,” Guan wrote back on behalf of her co-directors. “Naturally, we saw some potentially humorous parallels with the CaRMS process.”

Co-Directors’ Top 5 Reasons to Check out MVN:

Discover hidden talents of medical students at Queen’s

Find out what we have been doing with our spare time

Support everyone who has put their time and effort into MVN

Donate to great charitable causes

Have a great time!

The co-directors and performers are keeping as much of the program under wraps as possible (we have to go see the show to find out more), but they tease that we can expect hilarious class skits and videos—“featuring gnomes, time travel, CanMEDS competencies, and more!”—the largest Bollywood act in MVN history, the first ever QMed Qrew hip hop number, a concert pianist, and many talented musicians and singers.

MVN2015 Poster - AG

It’s that kind of enthusiasm and talent that has helped ensure MVN is an enduring QMed tradition.

“Whether students want to have their moment in the spotlight, film promotional videos, manage the show behind the wings, or even just bake for our bake sale, there is a role for everyone in MVN,” Guan wrote.

MVN is a significant time investment to create two evenings of entertainment. Why do so many medical students pitch in? “Perhaps it is because it is during these grueling hours of preparation and rehearsal that we learn something important about ourselves, something we don’t learn sitting in class,” Guan wrote. “We learn how to deal with our frustrations and manage our insecurities. We learn about the joy of striving for perfection but also the beauty of imperfection. And, most importantly, we learn that succeeding together, as a team, is just as fulfilling — if not more so, than succeeding as an individual.”

Each year, MVN proceeds support charities selected by the students. This year, they’ve chosen the Class of 2017 project, “Reads for Paeds” and Almost Home, a local Kingston charity.

“Given that a significant portion of the class in involved in the Reads for Paeds project, we wanted to collaborate with them in raising funds to print storybooks, written and illustrated by our class, to explain common chronic illnesses affecting children,” Guan wrote. “We also wanted to select a local charity that supports families with children who are receiving medical treatment, and Almost home fit this criteria perfectly.”

More information on both Reads for Paeds and Almost Home is available on the MVN website: www.houseofcarms.com

In addition to funds raised through ticket sales, there are other fundraisers at the show, including a bake sale, raffle tickets and a silent auction for one large MVN banner featuring pictures of the performers. Donations are also being accepted (all donations greater than $50 receive a tax receipt).

Tickets are sold for $12 online and $15 at the door. Online ticket purchases and online donations can be made here.

In the meantime, check out the MVN promo video here and see the hosts explain why they volunteered here. And we’ll see you at the show!

 

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