20th Annual Travill Debate set for November 7

The 20th annual A.A. Travill Debate is set for November 7 in the Ellis Hall Auditorium, 58 University Avenue, beginning at 5:45 p.m.

This year’s topic is:

Be it resolved that… Publicly funded hospitals should not be able to have religious affiliation

On the “Yea” side, arguing for the proposition will be Dr. Andrea Winthrop and Meds 2022 student Nathan Katz while Dr. Michael Fitzpatrick and Meds 2021 student Sara Brade will argue the “Nay” side.

As described on the Travill Debate website, the debate will “run on a polite and rigorously timed schedule” which features:

  • 10 minutes for each member of the team, alternating back and forth – Yea and Nay – until all four participants have laid out their arguments.
  • Then two minutes for summary from one member of each side.
  • The Travill Debate Gavel is banged very loudly when the time limits are reached.
  • No Power Point or technological aids.
  • Humour is welcome. Formal attire and costumes have also been used to good effect.

This annual debate – featuring a controversial topic in medicine – was created in memory of A.A. “Tony” Travill. As described on the debate’s web page:

Dr. Travill came to Canada in 1957 after serving as aircrew in the RAF (WWII) and reading Medicine at the London Hospital Medical School. He did a residency year in Montreal and practised in Orillia with Dr. Philip Rynard (Queen’s ’26) before coming to Queen’s to study Anatomy under Dr. John Basmajian. After two years at Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska, Dr. Travill returned to Queen’s in the Department of Anatomy in 1964, becoming Professor and Head from 1969-1978. His research interests were in embryology, teratology and education. Dr. Travill was a strict parliamentarian and noted Faculty Historian (Medicine at Queen’s; 1854-1920, the Hannah Institute for the History of Medicine, 1988: Just a Few: Queen’s Medical Profiles, 1991). He served the community as a Trustee of the Separate School Board and in 1964 was a founding member of the John Austin Society, the still thriving local history of medicine club. In particular, Dr. Travill had a passion for debate on current social, political and educational issues, and for many years he delivered a rigorous and challenging lecture to incoming first year medical students during orientation week.

As further noted by Dr. Jaclyn Duffin, then-Hannah Chair for the History of Medicine, in the original proposal for the memorial debate:

“As his friends and colleagues know, A.A. ‘Tony’ Travill was intelligent, quick, witty, a great teacher, who loved to talk—preferably to argue. Proud of his credentials in clinical medicine and his origins in practice, he rose to head a basic science department (Anatomy). He was an erudite historian, with distinguished publications… Travill also had a deep interest in Philosophy, especially logic, ethics, and epistemology. He loved to cast doubt, to stir up trouble, but he didn’t really mind losing.”

Please join us! All are welcome!

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Well trained and committed clinicians can indeed succeed in the research world. Celebrating the accomplishments of two Queen’s Grads

Most organizations we join in the course of our professional careers are a natural consequence or requirement of what we do. There are others that carry some degree of prestige or special recognition that we may choose to apply to with the hope of being selected. A few organizations – very few indeed – come looking for special people. These are called “Honorific” societies, because they seek and recognize individuals whose lifetime work merits special recognition.

The Royal Society of Canada is such an organization. According to its website:

The RSC is the recognized pre-eminent body of independent scholars, researchers and creative people in Canada whose Fellows comprise a collegium that can provide intellectual leadership for the betterment of Canada and the world.

RSC Fellows are men and women from all branches of learning who have made remarkable contributions in the arts, the humanities and the sciences, as well as in Canadian public life.

 

In the United States, the National Academy of Medicine is another such organization. It describes it’s goals as follows:

  • An independent, evidence-based scientific advisor. To carry out our work, we harness the talents and expertise of accomplished, thoughtful volunteers and undertake meticulous processes to avoid and balance bias. Our foundational goal is to be the most reliable source for credible scientific and policy advice on matters concerning human health.
  • A national academy with global scope. Although the National Academies were originally created to advise the U.S. government and advance the well-being of the U.S. population, our mandate is now much broader. The NAM includes members from across the globe and partners with organizations worldwide to address challenges that affect us all.
  • Committed to catalyzing action and achieving impact. We identify and generate momentum around critical issues in health; marshal diverse expertise to build evidence-based solutions; inspire action through collaboration and public engagement; and foster the next generation of leaders and innovators.
  • Collaborative and interdisciplinary. In partnership with the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and other stakeholders, the NAM draws on expertise across disciplines and domains to advance science, medicine, technology, and health.
  • An honorific society for exceptional leaders. The NAM has more than 2,000 members elected by their peers in recognition of outstanding achievement. Through a commitment to volunteer service, NAM members help guide the work and advance the mission of the NAM and the National Academies.

 

Recently, two graduates of our medical school have been named to these societies. Dr. Stephen Archer is a friend and classmate from Meds 81.  I’ll again quote from the citation provided by the RSC in announcing his appointment:

 

 

Stephen Archer is Professor and Head of Medicine at Queen’s University and a world renowned cardiologist and leader in several research fields, including oxygen sensing, vascular biology, and the experimental therapeutics of pulmonary hypertension and, more recently, cancer. He has made numerous discoveries that can undisputedly be considered firsts, particularly in regard to defining the roles of mitochondrial fission/fusion and metabolism in oxygen-sensing and cell proliferation.

 

 

 

Dr. Azad Bonni is a Meds 86 grad and well-remembered by many current faculty. He also has the distinction of being the younger brother of my colleague Dr. Hoshiar Abdollah. Again, I quote from a announcement provided by his current school:

Bonni is the Edison Professor and head of the Department of Neuorsciences at Washington University School of Medicine and director of the university’s McDonnell Center for Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology. An international leader in molecular neuroscience, Bonni has made seminal contributions to our understanding of how the brain is built at the level of individual connections between nerve cells, and how deregulation of those mechanisms contributes to neurological diseases. His group has discovered fundamental signaling networks within nerve cells that program neural circuit assembly and function in the developing brain. Using brain development as a guide, the Bonni laboratory also has provided novel insights into neurological disorders including neurodevelopmental disorders of cognition such as intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders, brain tumors and neurodegenerative diseases.

 

 

Neither Archer nor Bonni acquired their research expertise while in medical school. However, I believe both would agree that their ability to formulate important and relevant research themes and the commitment required to pursue those issues in a scientifically rigourous fashion was rooted in their understanding and personal involvement in clinical medicine and likely fostered by exposure to people and situations they encountered as medical students.

The role of research in undergraduate medical education has always been controversial. In an increasingly packed undergraduate curriculum, it is often sacrificed in favour of the many therapeutic applications and competency objectives medical schools are expected to provide. In fact, many current curricular frameworks have chosen to exclude it completely.

At Queen’s, we made the deliberate decision to include it in our list of essential EPAs, our only departure and addition to the nationally accepted list. We include research involvement as a core component of our curriculum (the Critical Enquiry), provide opportunities for summer research involvement, and integrate aspects of translational research into our teaching in various courses.

We do so not with the expectation that every student will become an independent researcher, but because we believe understanding research methodology makes us all better “consumers” of new information and that these early experiences may be formative and awaken a passion for research in those who had not previously imagined it either within their reach or as component of their career.

Congratulations to Drs. Archer and Bonni, and thanks for affirming that solidly trained and committed clinicians can, indeed, achieve great things in the research world.

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History of Medicine Week: 100 years later… Looking Back on the First World War and the Spanish Influenza October 22-26th

By Kelly Salman (Meds 2021)

The What Happened in Medicine (WHIM) Historical Society is proud to host the fourth annual History of Medicine Week! This year’s theme highlights a significant anniversary for both medicine and the world. A century ago in 1918, two major and interconnected events in history occurred: the Spanish flu and WWI. Learn more about what happened in medicine then and consider how things have (or haven’t) changed in our present day 2018 — 100 years later…

Students, Faculty, and Community members are all welcome to attend.

Museum of Health Care Showcase

Monday October 22nd, 8:30am-3:30pm

New Medical Building Grande Corridor, 15 Arch St.

Many of our greatest medical technologies and advancements have come out of times of crisis. Come and peruse a sampling of century-old artifacts from both the Spanish Flu and WWI. Curated by the Museum of Healthcare.


Speaker Panel Followed by Wine and Cheese Reception

Tuesday October 23rd, 5:30-8:00pm

Speaker panel: New Medical Building, Rm 132 A, 5:30-7:00pm

Reception: Museum of Healthcare, 7:00-8:00pm

 

“We Forgot to Remember – young Canadians commemorating the stories of the 1918 Pandemic”

Award-winning Neil Orford will discuss the Spanish Flu and its impact in medicine.

 

“Brock Chisholm and the Legacy of War Trauma”

Military historians Dr. Robert Engen and Matthew Barrett will discuss the trauma of war through their research on the experiences of Lt. Brock Chisholm in the first world war before he became a physician and the first director general of the WHO. Dr. Engen and Mr. Barrett created a graphic novel to illustrate this narrative, as featured in the Queen’s Alumni Review this summer: https://www.queensu.ca/gazette/alumnireview/stories/battle-hill-70

 About the Speakers:

In 2017, Neil Orford retired from teaching History at Centre Dufferin District High School in Shelburne, ON. His work as a teacher has seen him win numerous awards for his teaching, most recently the 2015 Government of Canada History Award for Teaching; as well as the prestigious 2013 Canadian Governor General’s Award for History Teaching and the 2012 Ontario Premier’s Award for Teaching Excellence. In July 2013, Neil Orford founded a consulting business, Canadian Historical Educational Services, Ltd. to assist school boards, museums, non-profits & government agencies with designing educational programs for historical thinking and commemoration. This work has led him to consultation work with the Federal Ministry of Canadian Heritage in 2017, helping to design digital commemorations for students across Canada.

Dr. Robert Engen, MA’08, PhD’14 (History) is an assistant professor of history at Royal Military College and an adjunct professor in the Department of History at Queen’s. He is the author of Canadians Under Fire: Infantry Effectiveness in the Second World War and Strangers in Arms: Combat Motivation in the Canadian Army, 1943–1945, both published by McGill-Queen’s University Press.

Matthew Barrett is an SSHRC-funded PhD candidate in the Department of History at Queen’s. His doctoral research examines the concepts of honour and dishonour within military culture. In particular, he studies the dismissal and cashiering of Canadian officers during both World Wars. Additional research focuses on Canadian public and institutional attitudes toward suicide in the military. His academic work has appeared in Canadian Military Journal, Canadian Military History, Journal of Canadian Studies and British Journal of Canadian Studies. He has also illustrated two First World War graphic novels with Robert Engen.


Trivia Night

Friday October 26th, 7:00-9:00pm

The Grad Club, 162 Barrie St.

 Impress your friends with your history know-how during a historically themed Trivia Night! Snacks will be provided!

 

 

 

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Poetry, journalism, and a Pepsi commercial… or, a meandering parable about balance

I started writing poetry again recently. I do this, then abandon it, then reclaim it at various intervals. I’m always better with it.

This may seem to have very little – if anything – to do with medical education. And, you’re right in one sense. Join me on a little self-indulgent meandering to get to my point.

As I write this, it’s Thanksgiving Day – a day when people traditionally reflect on their blessings and things they’re grateful for. And, I’m on the cusp of a milestone birthday, so perhaps that has made me more introspective than other weeks, when I write about course evaluations and how we value them (we do!), or team-based learning and how it contributes to long-term learning and understanding more than straight lectures (it does!), or ways service-learning contributes to both social accountability and professional development (yes!). So, I find myself thinking about poetry.

On the road to becoming any professional – and medicine is no exception – we ask people to shed a lot of things along the way.

We ask people to shed attitudes that aren’t aligned with their goals. To ditch beliefs that aren’t compatible with where they’re going. To replace erroneous information or practices with those that are proven to be more valid.

The profession of medicine itself demands other things – things I watch colleagues work through and cope with – long days, longer nights, emotional and physical demands they may never have imagined at the start of their careers.

Because, really, none of us truly ever know what we’re getting into.

All of this coalesces in a kaleidoscope of who we were and who we are and who we will be. The parts and colours shifting as the years turn.

My first career was in journalism. In the spring of Grade 12, I was accepted into the four-year Bachelor of Journalism program at the University of King’s College. They only accepted 35 students a year, out of nearly 1,000 applicants, so this was exciting! As parents are wont to do, my father, an English teacher, mentioned my acceptance to a colleague he saw at a conference. That colleague was the late Don Murray, then a professor of Journalism at the University of New Hampshire. Professor Murray later sent me a number of articles and a book on journalism (that I still have and use to this day), but he passed along advice through my father that was even more valuable.

“They’re going to teach her how to write a certain way,” he said. “And that’s important, and she needs to do that. But tell her not to give up her other stuff. She needs to keep doing that, too. It will make her a better writer.”

I haven’t always adhered to that advice, but over 32 years after first hearing it, I know its value. So I put pencil to paper to work out ideas, and thoughts, and metaphors. But, really, I’m claiming a part of myself I refuse to shed. It’s something I need to keep to be me. To be better.

Are there things you’ve accidentally shed along the way that you didn’t need to? Are there parts of you you’d like to reclaim, to give you that edge, that solace, that space to be you, preserved in the full person you want to be?

As I write this, I’m reminded of the 2004 diet Pepsi “old van” commercial… where a thirty-something dad is asked if there’s anything else youthful he’d like to experience and he says his old van. He then imagines his 1980s-era rocker painted van and what driving that in his current life (like dropping his kids off at school) would be like (not good!). Then he drinks his can of pop and is happy with that.

Some things can’t – and likely shouldn’t – be reclaimed. But if there’s something like poetry, or running, or music, or nosing around in antique shops, or reading trashy fiction (however you define that), or some other seemed-not-that-important-at-the-time thing that you miss about being you, consider ways to recapture that. And fit that “old” part amongst the newer parts.

Just maybe not that van.

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