Multiple avenues to service-learning for UG students

As part of its commitment to promote social responsibility and accountability as core values of its graduates, the Queen’s UGME program works to facilitate, encourage, support and acknowledge students’ service-learning.

While there are multiple definitions of service-learning, the UGME program has defined service learning as a learning experience that combines community service with preparation and reflection.

The UG Curriculum Committee first made this commitment formally in 2014 and continues to uphold it.

Service-learning is a unique type of volunteer service in its approach, specifically with the structured preparation and reflection requirements. Ideally, preparation involves consultations with community-member stakeholders. Additionally, the UG encourages students to focus on longer-term community engagement such as a term- or year-long commitment to build community relationships.

The UG, under the auspices of the Teaching, Learning, and Integration Committee (TLIC) has developed several avenues to service-learning: group service-learning projects, individual projects and individual activities.

Each SL endeavor must include preparation (including consultations with stakeholders where appropriate), service, and reflection on the service and learning that occurred. The TLIC assigned a minimum range of hours required for service (set at 15-20 hours). The hours threshold was established to ensure sufficiently meaningful engagement while recognizing students’ key responsibilities remain their academic studies.

Upon application and review, the TLIC designates student group activities as service-learning options. Sometimes these are activities designed specifically with recognized service-learning in mind. In other cases, existing student interest groups have designed service-learning options that participants can use to extend a volunteer activity into full service-learning. Some examples of our current approved group service learning projects are SWAM (which provides swimming lessons to children with disabilities), Jr. Medics (first aid workshops for elementary and middle-school students), and Altitude (mentoring for university students interested in a career in healthcare).

Students may also bring forward proposals for individual service-learning projects, typically in cooperation with a community-based agency. These are considered on a case-by-case basis applying the same criteria as for established group projects.

Individuals also have the option to pursue what the TLIC has designated as volunteer-based service learning. This option recognizes that not all community agencies’ needs fit our predominantly-project-based service-learning model.

Such organizations have a streamlined volunteer service system and any project that could be proposed by our medical students could be redundant to the agency’s mandate. The TLIC recognizes that medical students can meet the intended service and learning outcomes from working within these existing, established structures. For agencies that are pre-approved by the UGME, students may complete recognized service learning by following a non-project path.

For this non-project (activity) path, the TLIC has students complete different required preparation (typically research on the cooperating agency and/or the community need that is being met). Examples of approved settings for this type of SL include working at Martha’s Table and Pathways to Education’s tutoring programs. Students can bring forward suggested agency programs for approval for this path.

For any of these SL avenues, students are expected to initiate contact with the organizations themselves, although from time-to-time, the TLIC may work directly with an agency to set up pilot service-learning projects (such as the previous Loving Spoonful project). When these opportunities are available, students are informed through the AS and Class Presidents’ emails.

For more information on recognized service-learning options, feel free to email me at theresa.suart@queensu.ca

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Exceptional Healer Awards nominations now open

New award this year for allied health professionals

Nominations are now open for the fourth iteration of the Exceptional Healer Awards at Kingston Health Sciences Centre (KHSC). The deadline to submit nominations is Tuesday, December 31, 2019.

The award provides patients, families, staff and health care learners an excellent chance to celebrate health care professionals at KHSC who excel in providing patient- and family-centred care. Launched in 2017 recognizing outstanding physicians, the award was extended in 2019 to include a separate award to recognize nurses at KHSC. For this fourth iteration, a third category has been added for other allied health care professionals.

The award now honours doctors, nurses, and allied health professionals from KHSC’s two hostpial sites who are innovative in their approaches to patient care and who demonstrate exceptional bedside manner, which includes being approachable, empathetic, collaborative and respectful.

Patients, families, staff and health care learners can nominate a health care professional as long as he or she has provided care at the KHSC in the last two years. 

Here are the nomination details, as posted on the KHSC site:

If a health care professional at Kingston Health Sciences Centre (KHSC) has provided you with excellent patient- and family-centred care, now is your chance to nominate that person for an Exceptional Healer Award.

KHSC is encouraging patients to nominate doctors, nurses and allied health professionals (e.g., physiotherapists, occupational therapists, psychologists, social workers, dietitians) across our Hotel Dieu Hospital and Kingston General Hospital sites who are innovative in their approaches to patient care and who demonstrate an exceptional bedside manner, which includes being approachable, empathetic, collaborative and respectful.

Who can nominate? 
Patients and family members can nominate a KHSC health care professional who has provided care to them in the last two years.  KHSC staff can nominate colleagues on a patient care team.

Who is eligible?  
Physician nominees will have a current appointment at KHSC and will have been credentialed at KHSC for at least the past two years.  Other health care professional nominees must be KHSC staff members.

What are the criteria?  
The nominee creates an excellent patient care experience over and above the norm by exhibiting some or all of the following behaviours:

• Demonstrates compassion as a skillful clinician by displaying personal qualities such as approachability, flexibility and empathy.

• Uses novel or innovative methods in attempting to deliver compassionate care.

• Demonstrates a pattern of listening to and respecting patient and family perspectives and choices. 

• Exhibits a value of integrating patients and families into the clinical care model to ensure they are equal, informed participants in their health care.

• Honours the uniqueness of patients and families by incorporating their knowledge, values, beliefs and cultural backgrounds into the planning and delivery of care. 

What is required for the nomination?  
The nominator must complete a brief nomination form that includes yes-no questions and a short explanation of the candidate’s special qualifications for the award based on the criteria listed above.

Nomination forms are now available online. The deadline to submit nominations is Tuesday, December 31, 2019.

If you have questions about the award or nomination form, please contact the KHSC Leadership & Talent Development Department at 613-544-6666, ext. 8108.

Further details and nomination forms are available by clicking here. 

Exceptional Healer Award Past Winners

2017  

Dr. Richard Henry – Anesthesiology & Chronic Pain Clinic

            Dr. Tom Gonder – Ophthalmology & Retina Specialist

2018  

Dr. Shawna Johnston – Obstetrics & Gynaecology

2019  

Dr. Maria Velez, Obstetrics & Gynaecology

            Nurse Tracey Froess – Cancer Centre


This post was created with information supplied by Susan Bedell, including a KHSC blog post by Anne Rutherford

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Cervical Cancer Awareness Week: Fourth annual Pap Party event will take place October 21-24th

By Hayley Hill (Meds 2021), Zoe Hutchison (Meds 2021), Eva Bruketa (Meds 2022)

A unique partnership between Queen’s University Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology program and the South East Regional Cancer program out of the Cancer Centre of Southeastern Ontario (CCSEO) is helping to minimize barriers and ensure adequate access for all individuals with a cervix to receive cancer screening. Known as Pap Party, this collaboration offers free pap smear clinics across Southeastern Ontario for any individual with a cervix who may not have access to a primary care provider.

The most recent Cancer System Quality Index notes that only 63.6% of screen-eligible individuals in the South East region are up to date with their cervical cancer screening. As a result of the Pap Party campaign, in 2018 four clinic dates were held and 92 individuals received a pap smear. The highest number of individuals screened since the initiation of the Pap Party in 2015!

This year, the fourth annual Pap Party event will take place October 21-24th, during Cervical Cancer Awareness week. Any person with a cervix aged 21-70 who has not had a pap smear in the last three years is welcome. To increase accessibility to cervical cancer screening, individuals without primary care physicians, with or without a valid health card are encouraged to attend the Pap Party events.

The clinics are run by a team of medical students, and residents and physicians from the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department at HSCH in collaboration with the Federation of Medical Women of Canada (FMWC). The first Pap Party in 2015 took place in Kingston and has since grown to offer clinics in Bancroft, Napanee, and Tyendinaga as well. 

The 2019 Pap Party schedule is below:

  • Monday October 21 5:30pm – 7:30pm: HPEPH Bancroft
  • Tuesday October 22 5:30pm – 7:30pm: Community Well Being Centre, Tyendinaga, Mohawk Territory
  • Wednesday October 23 5:30pm – 7:30pm: Kingston Health Sciences Centre, (KGH site) Kingston
  • Thursday October 24 5:30pm – 7:30pm: Kingston Community Health Center, Napanee

Anyone interested in attending a Pap Party is encouraged to book an appointment by contacting Rachel at 1.800.567.5722 extension 7809 or CancerCareSE@KingstonHSC.ca

To further expand Pap Party and combat declining cervical cancer screening rates, we have also reached out to primary care clinics in the Kingston area encouraging them to host their own pap smear clinics during Cervical Cancer Awareness Week. They will also be encouraged to offer the HPV Vaccine. Clinics that register with the FMWC receive a kit that includes a tip sheet, colour poster, news release template, and patient education brochures.  To register your clinic and contribute to reducing cervical cancer rates, please visit https://fmwc.ca/events/pap-campaign/.

The FMWC website also has more information for individuals and will help them find a registered clinic nearby.

Thank you taking the time to learn about the Pap Party initiative. Please feel free to contact us if you would like any additional information and please spread information about the Pap Party event to any individuals you feel may benefit from this initiative in your life! We would be grateful and thrilled!

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Be a Mentor, Be Inspired by a Mentor

By Dr. Klodiana Kolomitro

Queen’s Faculty of Health Sciences’ educators already inspire each other on a daily basis.  The Office of Professional Development and Educational Scholarship (OPDES) is excited to launch a formal Faculty Mentorship Network to help nurture this culture of guiding and supporting colleagues.  

The Mentorship Network’s purpose is to serve as a reciprocal process for sharing experiences and fostering a trusting environment for career guidance and psychosocial support.  Engaged participation in the program will advance the educational development of both Mentees and Mentors.

What is the time commitment?  7 to 10 hours per year

Mentors will participate in an in-person pedagogical café in November, where the Director of Education Development will provide an overview of the program as well as share resources on effective mentorship.  Also in November, Mentees will participate in their first educational webinar with a focussed topic to help guide their Mentee-Mentor discussions.  Following the initial sessions, mentors and mentees are encouraged to schedule meetings on a monthly basis. Each Mentee-Mentor relationship should be driven by the Mentee and will vary based on the specific needs and strengths of the individuals. The program will wrap-up with a celebration dinner in May. We hope you will consider this opportunity to offer scholarly generosity and nurture collegial engagement.

How can you participate? APPLY online before September30:

https://queensu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0ritqt5W5ZkDhwF

OPDES will do their best to match all interested applicants, but cannot guarantee that every Mentor and Mentee will be matched in this first cohort. 

For more information on the Faculty Mentorship Network: visit https://healthsci.queensu.ca/mentor or contact:

Klodiana Kolomitro, PhD

Director, Education Development

Office of Professional Development & Educational Scholarship

613-533-6000 x. 77899 | kk78@queensu.ca

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Spring UGME retreat May 28

The spring UG Education retreat is coming up on May 28 at the Donald Gordon Conference Centre.

Designed primarily for course directors, unit leads, intrinsic role leads and others in educational leadership roles in our Undergraduate Medical Education program, this annual day-long event provides opportunities for information sharing and faculty development in planning for the next academic year.

The morning agenda includes an update from Associate Dean Anthony Sanfilippo as well as sessions on the progress test and quality assurance, accreditation & program evaluation. There will also be brief updates from the Librarian team at Bracken Library about new resources, and from the course team about the Human Structure & Function curriculum renewal.

The afternoon will begin with our guest speaker, Melissa Forgie, MD, FRCPC, MSc, Vice dean, UGME, University of Ottawa. She will speak on Embracing Diversity in Medical Education

Break out sessions will follow, including a working session for pre-clerkship course directors to build or revise assessment plans for next year and a clerkship course directors’ session on continued EPA/CBME implementation.

If you contribute to the Queen’s UGME program, please join us for all or part of the day. To register, use this link:  https://queensfhs.wufoo.com/forms/ugme-may-28-retreat-registration/

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Climate Change: What is our role?

By Sasha Létourneau with Gabe Lam and the Environmental Advocacy in Medicine group

“When the health effects of tobacco became known, the CMA quickly changed its investments. In times of climate change, health organizations around the world are divesting in fossil fuels.”  – Courtney Howard, Emergency Medicine physician and President of the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment

We (Canadians) are addicted to fossil fuels. There. I said it. Isn’t admitting it supposed to be the first step? Much like a smoker with a 20 pack-year history, humans stand on the brink of irreversible damage to that which sustains us, having to make the choice as to whether to quit or continue down a destructive path.

When I first started medical school, I took a history from a man who had been diagnosed with lung cancer after a 50 pack-year history of smoking. I was quite astonished when he admitted he had been shocked by the diagnosis. How is that possible? I thought, thinking back on all the anti-smoking ads I’d grown up with in school, and the terrifying pictures of black lungs and rotted teeth I’d seen on cigarette packages strewn on the sidewalk. How did he somehow ignore all the signs around him? These are questions I hope my children never have to ask my generation about climate change.

Continuing down the fossil fuel-burning track we are on today is easy in that the ramifications of our actions are not yet apparent in most of our everyday lives. Despite the fact that CO2 levels have risen far beyond where they have ever been in the past 400,000 years,1 we are only just starting to experience the effects of climate change. And much like COPD or lung cancer, the threats of climate change most likely to impact Canadians seem just far enough away that they are still only a hazy blur. Yet, like a smoker who is only just starting to experience the first signs of shortness of breath, we too have reached a tipping point and we need to act as soon as possible.

Studies have shown that among the top most important reasons Canadians begin the extremely difficult process of smoking cessation is their concern for their personal health.2,3 If health care professionals so adamantly advocate for smoking cessation to prevent our patients from its long-term health consequences, should we not, for the same reason, also advocate for cessation of fossil fuel dependency? And how do we convince a society (and, quite frankly ourselves) that this issue needs to be addressed now?

We’ve seen a number of recent examples that climate change is starting to threaten human health, including climate-related natural disasters like cyclone Idai which claimed hundreds of lives in Mozambique in March 2019. Touching a bit closer to home, the extreme temperatures of the Quebec heat wave in the summer of 2018 took the lives of more than 90 Canadians. And even closer to Kingston, many of us have watched with horror the footage of the recent flooding in the Ottawa River that has displaced hundreds of Canadians from their homes. I, personally, might even decry the number of lectures Queen’s Medicine students endure on Lyme disease as a direct result of climate change facilitating the spread of this tick-borne infectious disease.4

But most of us fossil-fuel “addicts” are already convinced that we need to begin to transition away from our weighty reliance on fossil fuels. So now comes the hardest part – beginning the process of actually quitting. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released a report in 2018 telling us that, in order to ensure global temperatures remain below 1.5˚C above pre-industrial levels, we need to significantly curb our fossil fuel use by the year 2030 and achieve net-zero carbon emissions by 2050. Why is this 1.5˚C cap so important? While 1.5˚C is still higher than current temperatures, keeping global temperatures at or below this level is humans’ best chance of mitigating further catastrophic events, including land loss from rising ocean levels, extreme heat waves, drought, increased ocean acidity and both land and ocean biodiversity loss. These climate events will inevitably threaten human health, food security, water security, job security, economic growth and physical safety from war and climate disasters.5

Unfortunately, (as far as I know) there is no magical solution and no promise that this transition will be immediate or smooth. And, like a smoker trying to quit, it is probably not realistic for us to quit cold turkey – we still are years away from being in any way independent of fossil fuels. We also need to ensure we enact a just transition for our fellow Canadians currently working in the fossil fuels industry. But if we never start the transition, if we never grasp hold of the “greatest global health opportunity of the 21st century” – tackling climate change – we will never know if we could have succeeded.6

If you’ve reached this point in the article, you may be wondering: what can I, a lowly Queen’s student/faculty/alumnus, contribute to the struggle against climate change? What can one single Canadian do? Luckily, the answer is: a lot! In this article, I’ll present you with a few ways you can start to engage as a climate advocate.

One avenue that our medical student group, Environmental Advocacy in Medicine, has undertaken is working with the Queen’s Backing Action on Climate Change (QBACC) group to ask that Queen’s divest from fossil fuel companies. We are joining them to ask that Queen’s:

  1. Freeze fossil fuel investment immediately
  2. Fully divest the Queen’s Endowment and Investment funds by 2025

QBACC needs support from students, faculty and alumni. A mass divestment movement can stigmatize and delegitimize fossil fuel use and the profiting corporations in the court of public opinion, a strategy that has also been crucial in combating smoking culture and destabilizing tobacco companies. The list of organizations calling for divestment is long and growing with new players being added every day, including commitments from the Canadian Medical Association, McGill University, Oxford University, the RockFeller Brothers Fund, the British Medical Association, New York City’s pension fund, the country of Ireland and many more. This movement on Queen’s campus has been growing since the first formal request for divestment of Queen’s funds from fossil fuels was rejected by the Board of Trustees in 2014. A diverse basis of support that includes a broad community of current and future health professionals will be imperative when QBACC approaches the Board of Trustees at their annual meeting in 2020.

If this cause speaks to you, ways you can support it are:

1. Becoming informed about divestment by reading a bit more about their campaign here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/17PDgVGUXaLyefEp_IwzD4JZ2OANh0qsh?usp=sharing

2. Signing and/or personalizing a letter to the Board of Trustees stating your support of the divestment campaign at Queen’s University (here: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1wDYfBT5h005XyudA-ac32fSIEU_Y6QUc)

3. Signing QBACC’s support forms:

If that’s not enough for you or you are still not sure about divestment, here are some other ways you can choose a cause, join an advocacy group and work to have your voice heard:

1. Become informed about climate change by:

  • signing up for the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment newsletter here, or
  • reading CAPE’s Climate Change Toolkit for Health Professionals here.

2. Or, better yet, join CAPE’s team (if you are a physician) here.

3. Support the Queen’s Environmental Advocacy in Medicine effort to increase climate change education in the curriculum by including information on climate change in your teaching material (contact us for more information at: queensenvironmed@gmail.com)

4. Talk to your fellow students and colleagues about their thoughts on climate change!

We are that patient with the 20-pack-year history leaving the doctor’s office, having been told the risks of letting the status quo take its course. We stand at the edge of a frightening precipice in human history, where our actions (or inaction) today will determine the world our children and grandchildren get to live in. But like that patient, we are fortunate.  We know the importance of taking action and we have a timeline during which to do so. It is now up to us whether we seize the “greatest global health opportunity of the 21st century.”6

References:

1. NASA. (2019, May 3). Graphic: The Relentless Rise Of Carbon Dioxide. Climate Change: Vital Signs Of the Planet. Retrieved from: https://climate.nasa.gov/climate_resources/24/graphic-the-relentless-rise-of-carbon-dioxide/

2. Wellman, R. J., O’Loughlin, J., O’Loughlin, E. K., Dugas, E. N., Montreuil, A., & Dutczak, H. (2018). Reasons for quitting smoking in young adult cigarette smokers. Addictive Behaviors, 77, 28-33. doi:10.1016/j.addbeh.2017.09.010

3. Kasza, K. A., Hyland, A. J., Borland, R., McNeill, A., Fong, G. T., Carpenter, M. J., . . . Cummings, K. M. (2017). Cross-country comparison of smokers’ reasons for thinking about quitting over time: Findings from the international tobacco control four country survey (ITC-4C), 2002–2015. Tobacco Control, 26(6), 641-648. doi:10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2016-053299

4. Brownstein, J. S., Holford, T. R., & Fish, D. (2005). Effect of Climate Change on Lyme Disease Risk in North America. EcoHealth2(1), 38–46. doi:10.1007/s10393-004-0139-x

5. https://www.ipcc.ch/sr15/

6. Watts, N., MA, Adger, W. N., Prof, Agnolucci, P., PhD, Blackstock, J., PhD, Byass, P., Prof, Cai, W., PhD, . . . Stockholm Resilience Centre. (2015). Health and climate change: Policy responses to protect public health.Lancet, the, 386(10006), 1861-1914. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(15)60854-6

Links:

1. Link to “Investing in a Sustainable Future” document prepared by QBACC: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/17PDgVGUXaLyefEp_IwzD4JZ2OANh0qsh?usp=sharing

2. Link to letter of support faculty/alumni can edit and send to QBACC: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1wDYfBT5h005XyudA-ac32fSIEU_Y6QUc

3. QBACC faculty support form: https://www.qbacc.org/divestment-petition

4. QBACC alumni support form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1onGYQBJAiDpPK0r7TbLqf1V0lj_sAWSCEYS_TkQdeMI/viewform?edit_requested=true

5. Sign-up for CAPE newsletter: https://cape.ca/media/blog/

6. Link to Climate Change Toolkit for Health Professionals: https://cape.ca/campaigns/climate-health-policy/climate-change-toolkit-for-health-professionals/

7. Sign-up for CAPE membership: https://cape.ca/become-a-member/

If you are a Queen’s UGME student who would like to submit a column for consideration as a guest blog, email me at theresa.suart@queensu.ca

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Medical Variety Night 2019 presents: Circadian Rhapsody!

By Charlotte Coleman, Emily Wilkerson, Stephanie Jiang, and Therese Servito, 2019 MVN Co-Directors

Medical Variety Night is an annual variety charity show hosted by the Queen’s University School of Medicine students and faculty.

On April 5th and 6th, 2019, we will be holding the 49th annual Medical Variety night! MVN is a longstanding tradition, with participation from over 200 students as well as faculty members. Acts include musical performances, comedic shorts, and dance productions, such as a 4-act Bollywood dance, an a cappella group, and a touching tribute from the outgoing class of 2019. Drawing an audience of over 500 attendees each year, MVN has consistently been one of the largest events hosted by the Queen’s School of Medicine. The event is frequented by the Queen’s medical community, students from the university, and many Kingston residents.

This year all proceeds go to the Good Minds Program for the Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte. (For more on Good Minds, check out their website: http://www.mbq-tmt.org/administration-and-services/community-wellbeing/good-minds)

The show will run on April 5th and 6th at Duncan McArthur Hall (511 Union St.), with doors opening at 6:30PM and the show starting at 7:00PM both evenings. Tickets are $15/students, $20/general admission online (medicalvarietynight.wordpress.com), or all tickets $20 cash only at the door. This year promises to be more exciting than ever before! For more information, and to meet our performers, check out our website: medicalvarietynight.wordpress.com

You can follow us on twitter @QmedMVN and attend our FB event:

https://www.facebook.com/events/312726582925340/?event_time_id=312726589592006.

Thank you so much, and we hope to see you at the show!

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Promoting wellness with the National Wellness Challenge

By Lori Minassian (MEDS 2021), Aescupalian Society Wellness Officer 2018-2019

As medical students, residents and physicians we are always told to put our patients first. In medical school, we sacrifice sleep and social activities to study to ensure that we will have the tools to properly serve future patients. Once we become residents, we work as hard as possible to be there for patients and this continues on throughout our careers as physicians.

Unfortunately, oftentimes, this means that we forget to take care of ourselves. For this reason, we see high rates of burnout in the medical community. In fact, the Canadian Medical Association National Physician Health Survey conducted in 2017 found that of the 3000 Canadian residents and physicians who responded, 30% reported burnout, 34% experienced symptoms of depression, and 8% had had suicidal ideations within the last 12 months. These issues are discussed at length in a recent position paper by the CFMS responding to medical student suicide.

These statistics highlight just how important it is to promote wellness as early as possible. If we can come up with tools to be well as medical students, we can hopefully use those tools as we progress in our careers as physicians. At Queen’s we are lucky enough to have a wellness curriculum, where we can discuss issues affecting the undergraduate classes and learn strategies to cope with wellness issues. We also have a wellness committee that strives to provide opportunities for student wellness through different events.

Wellness within the medical school becomes a priority during our annual Wellness Month, which runs in conjunction with the CFMS National Wellness Challenge. This year, wellness month runs from January 14 – February 10. You can participate as an individual or in teams of 3-5. Each week will focus on a different area of wellness. We kick off the month with Social Wellness week, followed by Physical Wellness, Mental Wellness and Nutritional Wellness. Each week, participants can follow national challenges set by the CFMS and track their points through the scoresheet provided upon registration. To register for the CFMS national wellness challenge, please follow the links below (Team sign up: bit.ly/NWC_team; Individual sign up: bit.ly/NWC_individual).

At the same time, we encourage students, residents and faculty to attend our Queen’s specific events. Some of the events we are running this year include a Multicultural Potluck Lunch, Zumba/Crossfit/Spin classes, a Movie Night, Lunch and Learn with a Dietitian and many more! The schedule of events can be found within this post. In addition, all of the information regarding Wellness Month can be found at our Facebook page: 2019 Wellness Challenge – Queens (https://www.facebook.com/groups/2019NWCQueens/). This year, we would love to see participation from as many students, residents and faculty as possible! All events are open to anyone who would like to attend, though some require you to sign up in advance. If you have any questions or concerns regarding wellness month, please e-mail me at wellness@qmed.ca. Let’s come together, promote our wellness and have fun as we do it!

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KHSC Nominations open for Exceptional Healer Awards

Nominations for the third iteration of the Kingston Health Sciences Centre (KHSC) Exceptional Healer Awards are open with a deadline of December 14.

Launched in 2017, the Exceptional Healer Awards are sponsored by the KHSC Patient & Family Advisory Council and was designed to honour a physician who demonstrates in clinical practices the core concepts of patient- and family-centred care: dignity and respect, information sharing, participation, and collaboration.

Prior honorees include ophthalmologist Dr. Tom Gonder and anesthesiologist Dr. Richard Henry (2017, tie) and urogynecologist Dr. Shawna Johnston (2018).

The award has been expanded this year to include one for physicians and one for nurses.

Physician nominees must, as a faculty member at Queen’s, have a current appointment at KHSC and have been credentialed at KHSC for at least the past two years. Nurse nominees must be KHSC staff members.

Patients and family members can nominate a KHSC physician and/or nurse who have provided care to them in the last two years while KHSC staff can nominate a physician and/or a nurse on a patient care team.

The awards committee is looking for nominees who:

  • Demonstrate compassion as a skillful clinician by displaying personal qualities such as approachability, flexibility and empathy
  • Use novel or innovative methods in attempting to deliver compassionate care
  • Demonstrate a pattern of listening to and honouring patient and family perspectives and choices
  • Exhibit a value of integrating patients and families into the clinical care model to ensure they are equal, informed participants in their health care
  • Honour the uniqueness of patients and families by incorporating their knowledge, values, beliefs and cultural backgrounds into the planning and delivery of care

For the 2018 award, patients, families and staff nominated 21 physicians for the award. Thirty-four nominations were receive, with about 25 percent coming from KHSC staff.

Medical students and nursing students are eligible to submit nominations in the “staff” category.

Further information and links to the nomination forms can be found here: http://www.kgh.on.ca/healer

 

 

 

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Actors, musicians & dancers?? QMed is gearing up for the 48th annual Medical Variety Night!

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By Edrea Khong, MVN co-director

It’s that time of year again! Medical Variety Night (MVN) is the School of Medicine’s annual charity variety show featuring UGME student performers from across all four years of training. This year’s theme, So You Think You Can Match, was selected by popular vote amongst the students and is a spin on the popular television show, So You Think You Can Dance. The theme may be particularly apropos yet contentious right now, given the increasing difficulties surrounding the CaRMS match. However, while the show is sure to feature references to this, it certainly is not the focus. The spotlight will remain on the performers, and the show aims to celebrate all that is Queen’s Medicine.

Wandering the halls of the School of Medicine during after-class hours, one may be treated to a glimpse of the beautiful madness that is MVN preparation. From large group dance rehearsals for hip-hop, contemporary (new this year!), or Bollywood, to table-reads and short filming sequences for class skits, the students have been working tirelessly to perfect their acts for the show. The acts seem to get bigger and more elaborate each year, and this year’s line-up surely will not disappoint!

As always, details about the act set list are being kept tightly under wraps, but showgoers can be assured that there will be a great variety with something for

MVN 2018 Directors Edrea Khong, Daisy Liu, Emily Wilkerson, & Charlotte Coleman

everyone. In addition, although there will be some “medical culture”-styled humour, the show is designed to be accessible by and entertaining for all. In the past, the show has been very well attended by people outside of the “Medicine Bubble™” to rave reviews.

Outside of the performers, there are many others who have been hard at work on the show, such as the promotions, tech, and backstage crews already doing vital behind-the-scenes work in preparation. In addition, Edrea Khong and Daisy Liu (2020s) have been joined this year by Charlotte Coleman and Emily Wilkerson (2021s) as the MVN 2018 Directors. The four have spent countless hours since mid-September organizing and preparing for the show. With the two-week countdown now underway, they are hard at work ensuring the show runs as smoothly as possible. During the show week, many more students will also lend a hand as bakers, ushers, ticket takers, raffle sellers, and much more. MVN is a project of love, dedication, and talent from all of QMed.

MVN 2018 Emcees Roya Abdmoulaie & Lauren Mak

All proceeds from this year’s show are going to Kingston Interval House, an organization committed to supporting women, children, and youth experiencing violence and working collaboratively with the community to eliminate all forms of violence and oppression. While great strides have been made worldwide towards establishing greater equality especially in these past few months, there is still much to be done and services like these are so vital. The decision to support Kingston Interval House feels very apt. In addition to ticket sales, MVN depends on the generosity of the Kingston community and Queen’s faculty. Raffle prizes featuring local Kingston businesses and a bake sale featuring QMed culinary talent can be found at the shows. Donations are also being accepted on the MVN website, with donations of $50 or greater receiving a tax receipt.

MVN 2018 takes place on April 6th and 7th at Duncan McArthur Hall (511 Union St.), with doors opening at 6:30PM and the show starting at 7:00PM both evenings. Tickets can be purchased for $13 on the MVN website, or for $15 at the door.

Get excited for a fantastic evening of performances celebrating another year of Queen’s Medicine! Gather your family and friends and purchase your tickets to MVN 2018 today. Looking forward to seeing you at the show!

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