Spring UGME retreat May 28

The spring UG Education retreat is coming up on May 28 at the Donald Gordon Conference Centre.

Designed primarily for course directors, unit leads, intrinsic role leads and others in educational leadership roles in our Undergraduate Medical Education program, this annual day-long event provides opportunities for information sharing and faculty development in planning for the next academic year.

The morning agenda includes an update from Associate Dean Anthony Sanfilippo as well as sessions on the progress test and quality assurance, accreditation & program evaluation. There will also be brief updates from the Librarian team at Bracken Library about new resources, and from the course team about the Human Structure & Function curriculum renewal.

The afternoon will begin with our guest speaker, Melissa Forgie, MD, FRCPC, MSc, Vice dean, UGME, University of Ottawa. She will speak on Embracing Diversity in Medical Education

Break out sessions will follow, including a working session for pre-clerkship course directors to build or revise assessment plans for next year and a clerkship course directors’ session on continued EPA/CBME implementation.

If you contribute to the Queen’s UGME program, please join us for all or part of the day. To register, use this link:  https://queensfhs.wufoo.com/forms/ugme-may-28-retreat-registration/

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Climate Change: What is our role?

By Sasha Létourneau with Gabe Lam and the Environmental Advocacy in Medicine group

“When the health effects of tobacco became known, the CMA quickly changed its investments. In times of climate change, health organizations around the world are divesting in fossil fuels.”  – Courtney Howard, Emergency Medicine physician and President of the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment

We (Canadians) are addicted to fossil fuels. There. I said it. Isn’t admitting it supposed to be the first step? Much like a smoker with a 20 pack-year history, humans stand on the brink of irreversible damage to that which sustains us, having to make the choice as to whether to quit or continue down a destructive path.

When I first started medical school, I took a history from a man who had been diagnosed with lung cancer after a 50 pack-year history of smoking. I was quite astonished when he admitted he had been shocked by the diagnosis. How is that possible? I thought, thinking back on all the anti-smoking ads I’d grown up with in school, and the terrifying pictures of black lungs and rotted teeth I’d seen on cigarette packages strewn on the sidewalk. How did he somehow ignore all the signs around him? These are questions I hope my children never have to ask my generation about climate change.

Continuing down the fossil fuel-burning track we are on today is easy in that the ramifications of our actions are not yet apparent in most of our everyday lives. Despite the fact that CO2 levels have risen far beyond where they have ever been in the past 400,000 years,1 we are only just starting to experience the effects of climate change. And much like COPD or lung cancer, the threats of climate change most likely to impact Canadians seem just far enough away that they are still only a hazy blur. Yet, like a smoker who is only just starting to experience the first signs of shortness of breath, we too have reached a tipping point and we need to act as soon as possible.

Studies have shown that among the top most important reasons Canadians begin the extremely difficult process of smoking cessation is their concern for their personal health.2,3 If health care professionals so adamantly advocate for smoking cessation to prevent our patients from its long-term health consequences, should we not, for the same reason, also advocate for cessation of fossil fuel dependency? And how do we convince a society (and, quite frankly ourselves) that this issue needs to be addressed now?

We’ve seen a number of recent examples that climate change is starting to threaten human health, including climate-related natural disasters like cyclone Idai which claimed hundreds of lives in Mozambique in March 2019. Touching a bit closer to home, the extreme temperatures of the Quebec heat wave in the summer of 2018 took the lives of more than 90 Canadians. And even closer to Kingston, many of us have watched with horror the footage of the recent flooding in the Ottawa River that has displaced hundreds of Canadians from their homes. I, personally, might even decry the number of lectures Queen’s Medicine students endure on Lyme disease as a direct result of climate change facilitating the spread of this tick-borne infectious disease.4

But most of us fossil-fuel “addicts” are already convinced that we need to begin to transition away from our weighty reliance on fossil fuels. So now comes the hardest part – beginning the process of actually quitting. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released a report in 2018 telling us that, in order to ensure global temperatures remain below 1.5˚C above pre-industrial levels, we need to significantly curb our fossil fuel use by the year 2030 and achieve net-zero carbon emissions by 2050. Why is this 1.5˚C cap so important? While 1.5˚C is still higher than current temperatures, keeping global temperatures at or below this level is humans’ best chance of mitigating further catastrophic events, including land loss from rising ocean levels, extreme heat waves, drought, increased ocean acidity and both land and ocean biodiversity loss. These climate events will inevitably threaten human health, food security, water security, job security, economic growth and physical safety from war and climate disasters.5

Unfortunately, (as far as I know) there is no magical solution and no promise that this transition will be immediate or smooth. And, like a smoker trying to quit, it is probably not realistic for us to quit cold turkey – we still are years away from being in any way independent of fossil fuels. We also need to ensure we enact a just transition for our fellow Canadians currently working in the fossil fuels industry. But if we never start the transition, if we never grasp hold of the “greatest global health opportunity of the 21st century” – tackling climate change – we will never know if we could have succeeded.6

If you’ve reached this point in the article, you may be wondering: what can I, a lowly Queen’s student/faculty/alumnus, contribute to the struggle against climate change? What can one single Canadian do? Luckily, the answer is: a lot! In this article, I’ll present you with a few ways you can start to engage as a climate advocate.

One avenue that our medical student group, Environmental Advocacy in Medicine, has undertaken is working with the Queen’s Backing Action on Climate Change (QBACC) group to ask that Queen’s divest from fossil fuel companies. We are joining them to ask that Queen’s:

  1. Freeze fossil fuel investment immediately
  2. Fully divest the Queen’s Endowment and Investment funds by 2025

QBACC needs support from students, faculty and alumni. A mass divestment movement can stigmatize and delegitimize fossil fuel use and the profiting corporations in the court of public opinion, a strategy that has also been crucial in combating smoking culture and destabilizing tobacco companies. The list of organizations calling for divestment is long and growing with new players being added every day, including commitments from the Canadian Medical Association, McGill University, Oxford University, the RockFeller Brothers Fund, the British Medical Association, New York City’s pension fund, the country of Ireland and many more. This movement on Queen’s campus has been growing since the first formal request for divestment of Queen’s funds from fossil fuels was rejected by the Board of Trustees in 2014. A diverse basis of support that includes a broad community of current and future health professionals will be imperative when QBACC approaches the Board of Trustees at their annual meeting in 2020.

If this cause speaks to you, ways you can support it are:

1. Becoming informed about divestment by reading a bit more about their campaign here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/17PDgVGUXaLyefEp_IwzD4JZ2OANh0qsh?usp=sharing

2. Signing and/or personalizing a letter to the Board of Trustees stating your support of the divestment campaign at Queen’s University (here: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1wDYfBT5h005XyudA-ac32fSIEU_Y6QUc)

3. Signing QBACC’s support forms:

If that’s not enough for you or you are still not sure about divestment, here are some other ways you can choose a cause, join an advocacy group and work to have your voice heard:

1. Become informed about climate change by:

  • signing up for the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment newsletter here, or
  • reading CAPE’s Climate Change Toolkit for Health Professionals here.

2. Or, better yet, join CAPE’s team (if you are a physician) here.

3. Support the Queen’s Environmental Advocacy in Medicine effort to increase climate change education in the curriculum by including information on climate change in your teaching material (contact us for more information at: queensenvironmed@gmail.com)

4. Talk to your fellow students and colleagues about their thoughts on climate change!

We are that patient with the 20-pack-year history leaving the doctor’s office, having been told the risks of letting the status quo take its course. We stand at the edge of a frightening precipice in human history, where our actions (or inaction) today will determine the world our children and grandchildren get to live in. But like that patient, we are fortunate.  We know the importance of taking action and we have a timeline during which to do so. It is now up to us whether we seize the “greatest global health opportunity of the 21st century.”6

References:

1. NASA. (2019, May 3). Graphic: The Relentless Rise Of Carbon Dioxide. Climate Change: Vital Signs Of the Planet. Retrieved from: https://climate.nasa.gov/climate_resources/24/graphic-the-relentless-rise-of-carbon-dioxide/

2. Wellman, R. J., O’Loughlin, J., O’Loughlin, E. K., Dugas, E. N., Montreuil, A., & Dutczak, H. (2018). Reasons for quitting smoking in young adult cigarette smokers. Addictive Behaviors, 77, 28-33. doi:10.1016/j.addbeh.2017.09.010

3. Kasza, K. A., Hyland, A. J., Borland, R., McNeill, A., Fong, G. T., Carpenter, M. J., . . . Cummings, K. M. (2017). Cross-country comparison of smokers’ reasons for thinking about quitting over time: Findings from the international tobacco control four country survey (ITC-4C), 2002–2015. Tobacco Control, 26(6), 641-648. doi:10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2016-053299

4. Brownstein, J. S., Holford, T. R., & Fish, D. (2005). Effect of Climate Change on Lyme Disease Risk in North America. EcoHealth2(1), 38–46. doi:10.1007/s10393-004-0139-x

5. https://www.ipcc.ch/sr15/

6. Watts, N., MA, Adger, W. N., Prof, Agnolucci, P., PhD, Blackstock, J., PhD, Byass, P., Prof, Cai, W., PhD, . . . Stockholm Resilience Centre. (2015). Health and climate change: Policy responses to protect public health.Lancet, the, 386(10006), 1861-1914. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(15)60854-6

Links:

1. Link to “Investing in a Sustainable Future” document prepared by QBACC: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/17PDgVGUXaLyefEp_IwzD4JZ2OANh0qsh?usp=sharing

2. Link to letter of support faculty/alumni can edit and send to QBACC: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1wDYfBT5h005XyudA-ac32fSIEU_Y6QUc

3. QBACC faculty support form: https://www.qbacc.org/divestment-petition

4. QBACC alumni support form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1onGYQBJAiDpPK0r7TbLqf1V0lj_sAWSCEYS_TkQdeMI/viewform?edit_requested=true

5. Sign-up for CAPE newsletter: https://cape.ca/media/blog/

6. Link to Climate Change Toolkit for Health Professionals: https://cape.ca/campaigns/climate-health-policy/climate-change-toolkit-for-health-professionals/

7. Sign-up for CAPE membership: https://cape.ca/become-a-member/

If you are a Queen’s UGME student who would like to submit a column for consideration as a guest blog, email me at theresa.suart@queensu.ca

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Medical Variety Night 2019 presents: Circadian Rhapsody!

By Charlotte Coleman, Emily Wilkerson, Stephanie Jiang, and Therese Servito, 2019 MVN Co-Directors

Medical Variety Night is an annual variety charity show hosted by the Queen’s University School of Medicine students and faculty.

On April 5th and 6th, 2019, we will be holding the 49th annual Medical Variety night! MVN is a longstanding tradition, with participation from over 200 students as well as faculty members. Acts include musical performances, comedic shorts, and dance productions, such as a 4-act Bollywood dance, an a cappella group, and a touching tribute from the outgoing class of 2019. Drawing an audience of over 500 attendees each year, MVN has consistently been one of the largest events hosted by the Queen’s School of Medicine. The event is frequented by the Queen’s medical community, students from the university, and many Kingston residents.

This year all proceeds go to the Good Minds Program for the Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte. (For more on Good Minds, check out their website: http://www.mbq-tmt.org/administration-and-services/community-wellbeing/good-minds)

The show will run on April 5th and 6th at Duncan McArthur Hall (511 Union St.), with doors opening at 6:30PM and the show starting at 7:00PM both evenings. Tickets are $15/students, $20/general admission online (medicalvarietynight.wordpress.com), or all tickets $20 cash only at the door. This year promises to be more exciting than ever before! For more information, and to meet our performers, check out our website: medicalvarietynight.wordpress.com

You can follow us on twitter @QmedMVN and attend our FB event:

https://www.facebook.com/events/312726582925340/?event_time_id=312726589592006.

Thank you so much, and we hope to see you at the show!

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Promoting wellness with the National Wellness Challenge

By Lori Minassian (MEDS 2021), Aescupalian Society Wellness Officer 2018-2019

As medical students, residents and physicians we are always told to put our patients first. In medical school, we sacrifice sleep and social activities to study to ensure that we will have the tools to properly serve future patients. Once we become residents, we work as hard as possible to be there for patients and this continues on throughout our careers as physicians.

Unfortunately, oftentimes, this means that we forget to take care of ourselves. For this reason, we see high rates of burnout in the medical community. In fact, the Canadian Medical Association National Physician Health Survey conducted in 2017 found that of the 3000 Canadian residents and physicians who responded, 30% reported burnout, 34% experienced symptoms of depression, and 8% had had suicidal ideations within the last 12 months. These issues are discussed at length in a recent position paper by the CFMS responding to medical student suicide.

These statistics highlight just how important it is to promote wellness as early as possible. If we can come up with tools to be well as medical students, we can hopefully use those tools as we progress in our careers as physicians. At Queen’s we are lucky enough to have a wellness curriculum, where we can discuss issues affecting the undergraduate classes and learn strategies to cope with wellness issues. We also have a wellness committee that strives to provide opportunities for student wellness through different events.

Wellness within the medical school becomes a priority during our annual Wellness Month, which runs in conjunction with the CFMS National Wellness Challenge. This year, wellness month runs from January 14 – February 10. You can participate as an individual or in teams of 3-5. Each week will focus on a different area of wellness. We kick off the month with Social Wellness week, followed by Physical Wellness, Mental Wellness and Nutritional Wellness. Each week, participants can follow national challenges set by the CFMS and track their points through the scoresheet provided upon registration. To register for the CFMS national wellness challenge, please follow the links below (Team sign up: bit.ly/NWC_team; Individual sign up: bit.ly/NWC_individual).

At the same time, we encourage students, residents and faculty to attend our Queen’s specific events. Some of the events we are running this year include a Multicultural Potluck Lunch, Zumba/Crossfit/Spin classes, a Movie Night, Lunch and Learn with a Dietitian and many more! The schedule of events can be found within this post. In addition, all of the information regarding Wellness Month can be found at our Facebook page: 2019 Wellness Challenge – Queens (https://www.facebook.com/groups/2019NWCQueens/). This year, we would love to see participation from as many students, residents and faculty as possible! All events are open to anyone who would like to attend, though some require you to sign up in advance. If you have any questions or concerns regarding wellness month, please e-mail me at wellness@qmed.ca. Let’s come together, promote our wellness and have fun as we do it!

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KHSC Nominations open for Exceptional Healer Awards

Nominations for the third iteration of the Kingston Health Sciences Centre (KHSC) Exceptional Healer Awards are open with a deadline of December 14.

Launched in 2017, the Exceptional Healer Awards are sponsored by the KHSC Patient & Family Advisory Council and was designed to honour a physician who demonstrates in clinical practices the core concepts of patient- and family-centred care: dignity and respect, information sharing, participation, and collaboration.

Prior honorees include ophthalmologist Dr. Tom Gonder and anesthesiologist Dr. Richard Henry (2017, tie) and urogynecologist Dr. Shawna Johnston (2018).

The award has been expanded this year to include one for physicians and one for nurses.

Physician nominees must, as a faculty member at Queen’s, have a current appointment at KHSC and have been credentialed at KHSC for at least the past two years. Nurse nominees must be KHSC staff members.

Patients and family members can nominate a KHSC physician and/or nurse who have provided care to them in the last two years while KHSC staff can nominate a physician and/or a nurse on a patient care team.

The awards committee is looking for nominees who:

  • Demonstrate compassion as a skillful clinician by displaying personal qualities such as approachability, flexibility and empathy
  • Use novel or innovative methods in attempting to deliver compassionate care
  • Demonstrate a pattern of listening to and honouring patient and family perspectives and choices
  • Exhibit a value of integrating patients and families into the clinical care model to ensure they are equal, informed participants in their health care
  • Honour the uniqueness of patients and families by incorporating their knowledge, values, beliefs and cultural backgrounds into the planning and delivery of care

For the 2018 award, patients, families and staff nominated 21 physicians for the award. Thirty-four nominations were receive, with about 25 percent coming from KHSC staff.

Medical students and nursing students are eligible to submit nominations in the “staff” category.

Further information and links to the nomination forms can be found here: http://www.kgh.on.ca/healer

 

 

 

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Actors, musicians & dancers?? QMed is gearing up for the 48th annual Medical Variety Night!

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By Edrea Khong, MVN co-director

It’s that time of year again! Medical Variety Night (MVN) is the School of Medicine’s annual charity variety show featuring UGME student performers from across all four years of training. This year’s theme, So You Think You Can Match, was selected by popular vote amongst the students and is a spin on the popular television show, So You Think You Can Dance. The theme may be particularly apropos yet contentious right now, given the increasing difficulties surrounding the CaRMS match. However, while the show is sure to feature references to this, it certainly is not the focus. The spotlight will remain on the performers, and the show aims to celebrate all that is Queen’s Medicine.

Wandering the halls of the School of Medicine during after-class hours, one may be treated to a glimpse of the beautiful madness that is MVN preparation. From large group dance rehearsals for hip-hop, contemporary (new this year!), or Bollywood, to table-reads and short filming sequences for class skits, the students have been working tirelessly to perfect their acts for the show. The acts seem to get bigger and more elaborate each year, and this year’s line-up surely will not disappoint!

As always, details about the act set list are being kept tightly under wraps, but showgoers can be assured that there will be a great variety with something for

MVN 2018 Directors Edrea Khong, Daisy Liu, Emily Wilkerson, & Charlotte Coleman

everyone. In addition, although there will be some “medical culture”-styled humour, the show is designed to be accessible by and entertaining for all. In the past, the show has been very well attended by people outside of the “Medicine Bubble™” to rave reviews.

Outside of the performers, there are many others who have been hard at work on the show, such as the promotions, tech, and backstage crews already doing vital behind-the-scenes work in preparation. In addition, Edrea Khong and Daisy Liu (2020s) have been joined this year by Charlotte Coleman and Emily Wilkerson (2021s) as the MVN 2018 Directors. The four have spent countless hours since mid-September organizing and preparing for the show. With the two-week countdown now underway, they are hard at work ensuring the show runs as smoothly as possible. During the show week, many more students will also lend a hand as bakers, ushers, ticket takers, raffle sellers, and much more. MVN is a project of love, dedication, and talent from all of QMed.

MVN 2018 Emcees Roya Abdmoulaie & Lauren Mak

All proceeds from this year’s show are going to Kingston Interval House, an organization committed to supporting women, children, and youth experiencing violence and working collaboratively with the community to eliminate all forms of violence and oppression. While great strides have been made worldwide towards establishing greater equality especially in these past few months, there is still much to be done and services like these are so vital. The decision to support Kingston Interval House feels very apt. In addition to ticket sales, MVN depends on the generosity of the Kingston community and Queen’s faculty. Raffle prizes featuring local Kingston businesses and a bake sale featuring QMed culinary talent can be found at the shows. Donations are also being accepted on the MVN website, with donations of $50 or greater receiving a tax receipt.

MVN 2018 takes place on April 6th and 7th at Duncan McArthur Hall (511 Union St.), with doors opening at 6:30PM and the show starting at 7:00PM both evenings. Tickets can be purchased for $13 on the MVN website, or for $15 at the door.

Get excited for a fantastic evening of performances celebrating another year of Queen’s Medicine! Gather your family and friends and purchase your tickets to MVN 2018 today. Looking forward to seeing you at the show!

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Bats, Blogs, and Story Ideas

While I was drafting this post, I had an unexpected visitor in my office in the form of a juvenile bat. Yep. A bat.

I followed the Queen’s Environmental Health & Safety bat protocol (yes, there is one. Find it here) and exited the room immediately, closing the door. I then had a colleague call to arrange for its removal.

Ok, there may have been some squealing-like-a-five-year-old while I was exiting the room, but since there was nobody here to see that, I can deny it happened (colleagues’ vacations and meetings were well-timed for my dignity). There may also have been some vocabulary that would earn a fine for the curse jar at my house.

Just a handful of people would know about my bat adventure… except I’m writing about it here.

My point is this: things happen all the time around the UGME offices, the medical building, and other places of importance for the UG program. Things for, to, or by our faculty, staff, and students; interesting things that are worth sharing. I’m not suggesting that we’re starting a weekly newspaper filled with notations of every bat sighting, or intramural sports scores. What I do know, however, is there are plenty of newsworthy things happening that go unnoticed.

Things like: innovative student activities or projects; research publications; special events; noteworthy field trips; students or faculty winning awards. If you’ve ever wondered why we posted about “X” but not about “Y” the simple reason most of the time, is we likely didn’t know about “Y” at all.

You may have noticed a bit of a pattern to our blog posts. Our associate dean, Dr. Sanfilippo posts roughly every other week. On the alternating weeks, members of the Education Team post, with the occasional committee update thrown in. I post under my own name, as well as curating those posted under the “Guest Blogger” ID.

Here’s where you come in. If you’re a member of the Queen’s UGME community and you have an idea or suggestion for a blog post, please feel free to get in touch. We could write something up with you as the source, or you could write the post yourself as one of our Guest Bloggers.

If your suggestion is time-dependent (like an event or something with a deadline), try to get in touch as early as you can.

I can’t promise that we’ll be able to follow-up on every suggestion with a published post, but a great starting point is letting us know. So, get in touch. Reach me by email (theresa.suart@queensu.ca ) or drop into my office on the 3rd floor at 80 Barrie. It’s currently bat-free.


Bat shown is for illustration purposes only… no pictures of my recent temporary office guest are available. 

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History of Medicine week highlights psychiatry

Dangerous Ideas in the History of Psychiatry is the theme of this year’s History of Medicine week here at Queen’s UGME.

Highlights for the week include a panel discussion with speakers from Queen’s, York University, and University of Toronto and an artifact showcase.

The Panel Discussion will take place on Wednesday, March 8 from 5 – 7 p.m. in Room 132 of the Medical Building on Arch Street; refreshments will be served.

Panelists will include:

Dr. Megan Davies, York University

  • “Messy History: Democratising the Story of Deinstitutionalization”

Dr. Edward Shorter, University of Toronto

  • Dangerous Ideas in the History of Psychiatry: ‘Hysteria’”

Prof. Steven Maynard, Queen’s University

  • Just Who Are You Calling a Dangerous Sexual Psychopath?: Psychiatry and the History of Homosexuality in Canada”

The Artifact Showcase will be found in the Medical Building Atrium on Thursday, March 9 from 9 a.m. – 3p.m. This drop-in exhibit will feature items from the history of psychiatry curated by the Museum of Health Care.

Both events are open to the public.

A student committee organized the week, supported by the School of Medicine and the Museum of Health Care. Student organizers included Ashna Asim, Yannay Khaikan, Harry Chandrakumaran, Chantal Valiquette along with executive members Daisy Liu, Hissan Butt and Laura Swaka. Dr. Jacklyn Duffin, Hannah Professor of the Hannah Chair in the History of Medicine at Queen’s, served as their faculty advisor.

 

 

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Pearls of wisdom, tearing up textbooks, and getting messy

We talk a fair bit about Pearls of Wisdom at the School of Medicine. The last class for the Class of 2016 ended with Pearls, presented by faculty selected by the class. Later this week, during orientation week, Pearls will be shared with our newly-minted class of 2020.

Pearls are succinct pieces of advice, aphorisms or other sage musings designed to guide, caution, or inspire.

IMG_4250
Artist Nancy Douglas (centre) offers suggestions to creative expressions participants at the first workshop in May.

Sometimes these pearls are explicitly stated as “here’s a pearl” as in those two learning events. Sometimes they are shared in a one-on-one feedback session during clerkship; or it’s that certain nugget of wisdom imparted during an FSGL session. Or the gem from an SGL case, or advice from a near-peer in a mentor group.

By their very nature, these Pearls of Wisdom are best experienced – in a true handing on of guidance in the moment, rather than as a bullet-list on a Post-it note. Given that medicine is both science and art, however (as made clear in many Pearls), we wondered if we could preserve these words of wisdom in a more permanent, concrete way while still maintaining the spirit of these fleeting sessions.

With this in mind, last spring, we started a different representation of these Pearls of Wisdom: a School of Medicine collage. Working with Kingston artist Nancy Douglas, participants selected images, situated them on a six-foot long canvass and used collage techniques to bring the images to life. The images came from old textbooks and journals — lots of tearing and gluing and hands-on creativity.

That first session in May was a start, but our collage is not finished!

FullSizeRenderThe second creative session for the collage will take place Monday, September 12 from 4:30 – 8:30 p.m. in the Atrium of the School of Medicine building. Students, faculty and staff from all years of the program are encouraged to take part.

Bring your ideas about medicine, your journey in medical education, and the pearls of wisdom you’ve received from faculty (and others) along the way. Also, bring any old textbooks and journals you’re willing to rip up for the collage! This is hands-on, so be prepared to get your hands mucky. (Collage is a bit like casting – without a broken bone).

This is a drop-in event, so you don’t need to plan to be there for the whole four hours. Please come when you can. Refreshments will be served, too!

Creative Expressions of Learning is hosted by Dr. Lindsay Davidson (Director, Teaching, Learning and Integration), Vincent Wu (Meds 2018), Stephanie Chan (Meds 2019); and Sheila Pinchin (UGME Education Team Manager).

The event is funded by the Creative Expressions Grant from Queen’s Centre for Teaching and Learning.

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Five great reasons to attend medical education conferences

This weekend many involved in undergraduate medical education at Queen’s are heading to Montreal for the annual Canadian Conference on Medical Education (CCME). From faculty, to students, to administrative staff, we’re attending as presenters, workshop facilitators, and in several other roles.

As described on its website, CCME is the largest annual gathering of medical educators in Canada. Attendees include Canadian and international medical educators, students, other health educators, health education researchers, administrators, licensing and credentialing organizations and governments. The goal is to “share their experiences in medical education across the learning continuum (from undergraduate to postgraduate to continuing professional development).”

This year’s conference in Montreal from April 16-19 is hosted by the University of Sherbrooke (other partners are the Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada (AFMC), the Canadian Association for Medical Education (CAME), The College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC), The Medical Council of Canada (MCC), and The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC).)

With the theme is Accountability: From Self to Society, the program includes workshops, posters, oral presentations and plenary sessions designed “to highlight developments in medical education and to promote academic medicine by establishing an annual forum for medical educators and their many partners to meet and exchange ideas.”ccme theme

Here are five good reasons we take the time from busy spring schedules to take part in this conference:

  1. To present innovations in medical education at Queen’s: We’re doing some great things here at Queen’s and it’s great to share these successes. From early-adoption of the flipped classroom to our First Patient Program, to our Accelerated Route to Medical School – CCME gives a forum to celebrate what we’re doing well.

  2. To learn from colleagues from other Canadian and international medical schools. While we share our innovations, it’s equally beneficial to learn from our colleagues at other schools. We don’t always have to reinvent the wheel.

  3. To wrestle with common issues and gain comfort from being in the same boat. There’s a synergy in working together to sort out challenging issues in medical education.

  4. To network with colleagues from across the country and around the world – this is closely related to both #2 and #3 – networking may not be about a specific challenge at a specific time, it’s making connections with like-minded individuals involved in similar circumstances.

  5. And the food. OK, so this might not be a “good” reason to commit to attend a conference, but it’s certainly a fun part of it. Combining #4’s networking with colleagues with exploring local cuisine is an added bonus.

If you can’t attend this year, consider it for next time. Also, explore conference options closer to home. Our own Queen’s Faculty of Health Sciences Celebration of Teaching, Learning and Scholarship is coming up on June 15.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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