Learning style quizzes are fun, but they shouldn’t inform teaching

When I completed my Bachelor of Education in the late 1990s, we spent a fair amount of time on learning styles. We explored Kolb’s styles (assimilator, diverger, accommodator, converger) and the VARK model (Visual, Auditory, Reading, Kinesthetic), and ones that incorporated relational aspects (social, independent, introvert, extrovert) in a quest to enhance our skills as educators to best meet our future learners’ needs.

It was presented as a “keys to success” insight – learn how to teach to each student’s preferred style, learn how to modify your instruction to meet every learner’s need, and all would be good.

From the learner’s perspective: figure out how you best learn, seek out learning experiences like that and voila – educational success.

We’ve heard this so often, from multiple avenues, that many of us accept it as an established principle rather than theories. (Just do a Google or an Amazon search and hundreds of sites and books will pop up).

A typical learning style inventory questionnaire and score sheet.

Human beings certainly have preferences – in learning and in all things. I really enjoy lectures. I like listening to someone else talk about an interesting topic and share knowledge and insights. I’ve had the pleasure of having some terrific history teachers, for example, who made things come alive in their storytelling. I learned a lot.

It was, in fact, an experience with a history course that helped me embrace the learning style message and hold it sacred for many years. I loved history and did really well in my high school courses without, I’ll admit, having to try very hard. Except for the unit on the Napoleonic Wars in Grade 11. I was away that week, at a conference, so instead of being in class for about an hour every day, I had the assigned chapters and the teacher gave me copies of his lecture notes. And I bombed the test. Being an auditory learner explained this. I hadn’t heard Mr. A’s lectures, so I didn’t learn as well. It made me feel better about my barely-passing grade, but was it true?

How did I usually learn history? I’d attend the classes (and take notes), read the assigned chapters, and reread my notes to study for the test. How did I do the unit on the Napoleonic wars? I read the assigned chapters and read my teacher’s notes. I actually spent about 50% less time on the unit than any other history unit that year. And I never took my own notes on that unit. Am I really an auditory learner and therefore didn’t test well on something I had to learn differently, or did I spend less time learning this material? Perhaps if I’d read the assigned chapters twice, or taken my own notes, or something else. Auditory learner doesn’t fully account for all variables.

Granted, I’m an n=1, but there’s an increasing body of research (with larger cohorts) that points to learning styles being a “myth”. Myth or not, there’s evidence that using a preferred learning style doesn’t lead to more or better learning. For example, Hussman and O’Loughlin (2018) found no correlation between learning styles and course outcomes for anatomy students, regardless of whether the students adapted their studying to align with their preferred learning style.

Knoll et al (2017) found that “learning style was associated with subjective aspects of learning but not objective aspects of learning.”

The other message in many of these studies: Context is key. Consider my history/auditory learning example, above. Lecture alone would not have gone over so well in an art history class. I may prefer to learn by listening, but isn’t it better to see the paintings rather than have someone describe them? Likewise, even if all the quizzes tell you that you’re an auditory learner, it’s a good bet that it still makes the most sense to learn about radiology using images. And procedural skills are best learned by actually physically engaging in them.

One on-going challenge of the cult of learning styles is it can become an excuse when students don’t master material (“The class didn’t suit my learning style” or “I need to better address students’ learning styles, how do I do that?”). However, a meta-analysis study by Hattie (2012) looked at 150 factors that affect students’ learning and matching teaching techniques to students’ learning styles had an insignificant effect (slightly above zero) (Hattie, 2012:79).

It’s good to remember that, as physicians, our students will have to learn and perform in a variety of ways (styles): reading, listening to people, looking at images of some sort or at patients when examining them, and use their tactile senses when examining patients, as some examples. Teaching them in a variety of ways, rather than using narrowly-focused learning style criteria, can only help them achieve this.

Key take-away points:

  • There are a variety of ways to learn and to teach and context matters
  • Some things are best taught in a particular way
  • We can have preferences for some learning experiences more than others, but we can learn in multiple ways
  • Your preferred learning style may not improve your learning
  • History lectures are always cool.  (They are, but that’s not relevant to this topic, really).

Note on classroom accommodations: Any discussion of learning styles and learning style research should not be confused or conflated with accommodations for learning disabilities or accommodations for physical disabilities which interfere with learning


My thanks to Dr. Lindsay Davidson, Director of Teaching and Learning, for talking through some of the ideas presented in this post.

References:

Hattie, J, 2012, Visible learning for teachers: maximising impact on learning, London, Routledge

Husmann, P. R. and O’Loughlin, V. D. (2018), Another nail in the coffin for learning styles? Disparities among undergraduate anatomy students’ study strategies, class performance, and reported VARK learning styles. American Association of Anatomists. . doi:10.1002/ase.1777

Knoll, A. R., Otani, H. , Skeel, R. L. and Van Horn, K. R. (2017), Learning style, judgements of learning, and learning of verbal and visual information. Br J Psychol, 108: 544-563. doi:10.1111/bjop.12214


Other cool reading on this topic:

From Frontiers in Psychology: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5366351/

From The Atlantic:

https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2018/04/the-myth-of-learning-styles/557687/

From the BBC:

http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20161010-do-we-have-a-preferred-style-of-learning

 

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Improving your medical teaching practice one minute at a time

Making changes in how we do things can seem overwhelming – whether these are personal wellness habits, work habits, or teaching practice habits. In the face of a huge list or a major innovation it can seem easier to throw in the towel before you begin.

Sustaining change means adopting new practices and habits that you can stick with.

I recently took a six-week online fitness course that focused on these types of incremental changes. The course is designed for working and stay-at-home moms and recognizes that everybody is really, really busy. Our first challenge was to pick a new habit to adopt that could be easily incorporated into our regular day (I chose skip the elevator—take the stairs). Another challenge was to adopt a one-minute daily task and stick with it – because, as the course leader pointed out: everybody has one minute. I (finally) started doing daily balancing exercises for my multiple-injury-damaged ankles. I’m five weeks in on that new daily one-minute habit, so I think it’s going to stick.

Along the way, I started thinking about one-minute habits and how this could apply to medical education. So here’s my challenge to those looking to improve or change their teaching practice:

Think of one thing that you can do in one minute (a day, or one minute at a time) that could improve your work in medical education. Adopt that one-minute habit. Here are some suggestions:

  1. Immediately after teaching, take ONE MINUTE to jot down quick notes on what you want to change the next time you teach. Do it right after your session, or you may forget what it is.

  2. Create a Med Ed “feel good file” in Google docs or another electronic format (this might take more than a minute): put in things like great feedback fro course evaluations, notes to yourself when something went really, really well with a class or a clerk, notes on teaching things you’re really proud of. If you’re having a bad (teaching) day, pull up the file and take ONE MINUTE to remind yourself of the good things you do as a medical educator.

  3. Reserve the last minute of class, seminar, or rounds to get two-sentence student feedback on index cards – what’s their top take-away from your session/seminar/rounds and what’s their muddiest point right now? Have them take ONE MINUTE to give you this feedback. Over the next week, take ONE MINUTE a day to read through some of the cards. Use the feedback to inform changes to your teaching or to shape a follow-up session.

  4. If you’re logged into MEdTech, take ONE MINUTE to annotate your session objectives on MEdTech. You likely already have these objectives in your PowerPoint slides, so you can just match them up to the assigned ones. (If you have multiple objectives, use your ONE MINUTE to do what you can now!)

  5. Start a teaching ideas journal (could be a notebook, or a word file, or the Notes app on your smart phone). After you’ve read a journal article, or talked with a colleague, or attended a workshop, take ONE MINUTE to write down ideas for how to incorporate this new information into your teaching

  6. Email or phone me and ask for help. No, seriously, do this. True story: While I was writing this post, a faculty member called and said: “Do you have one minute right now for a question?” We might not solve your challenge in a ONE MINUTE phone call, but if not, we can set a time to get together.

Sure, you could take more time on some of these ideas — but not at the expense of feeling overwhelmed by “one more thing” on a big project to-do list. Also, remember, these are suggestions to select from. Don’t take on all of them, because that has potential to turn into an overwhelming, throw-away plan. Pick one or two, or create your own. Because everyone has one minute.

 

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Curriculum Committee Information – March 22, 2018 & April 17, 2018

Faculty, staff, and students interested in attending Curriculum Committee meetings should contact the Committee Secretary, Candace Miller (umecc@queensu.ca), for information relating to agenda items and meeting schedules.

A meeting of the Curriculum Committee was held on March 22, 2018 and April 17, 2018.  To review the topics discussed at this meeting, please click HERE to view the agenda for March 22, 2018 and HERE to view the agenda for April 17, 2018.

Faculty interested in reviewing the minutes of the March 22 and April 17 meetings can click HERE to be taken to the Curriculum Committee’s page located on the Faculty Resources Community of MEdTech Central.

Those who are directly impacted by any decisions made by the Curriculum Committee have been notified via email.

Students interested in the outcome of a decision or discussion are welcome to contact the Aesculapian Society’s Vice President, Academic, Justine Ring at vpacademic@qmed.ca.

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“What Happened in Medicine?” Medical students ask Philadelphia

By Kelly Salman, photos by Rawy Shaaban, Queen’s medicine class of 2021

“The history quiz is due this weekend?!” a classmate pulled it up on his phone, while a few followed suit on laptops. We were waiting for the bus to take us to Philadelphia and while my peers debated the turbulent past of drug advertising, the rest of us talked about what we were excited to see. Many had plans for dramatic poses on the “Rocky steps” or near the Liberty Bell.

“What even is the liberty bell?” I shamelessly asked while googling the best spot to find cheesesteaks. The real reason we were heading over the border was for a history of medicine trip, the continuation of a long tradition for Queen’s Medicine students, one that started in 1996.

I can’t lie and say I’ve always appreciated history. Although I could fool you, or scare you, with my wide-eyed ramblings about how cool the plague must have been, history is an interest I’ve found late. But along my route to medicine, something romantic about the past has drawn me in, and I got the impression during this trip that I wasn’t alone. Perhaps it has something to do with entering a field that makes you take an oath to an ancient Greek guy, but as a group medical students seem somewhat enamoured with their own history.

Contrary to popular belief, history waits for no one, and we started our adventure early Saturday morning, coffees in hand. Pennsylvania Hospital was a great place to set the tone; I challenge anyone to sit in an old surgical amphitheatre and not get swept up in historical daydreams. It helped that our guide painted an incredible picture for us as we sat on elevated benches, peering down at a classmate sprawled out on the operating table. It’s the details that get you… for instance, the floor would have been covered in wood chips for soaking up, well, you can imagine. Or that the hospital opened its doors to those of the public curious to observe the spectacle. In a different life, I wondered, how many of us would have been in that audience.

We continued to a stately mansion, famous for housing a man modestly named “the Father of American Surgery”, or to his friends and family Dr. Philip Physick. The guide here had a slightly more blunt approach, but it fit with the narrative he was giving. As we perused Dr. Physick’s various inventions (surgical instruments and… soda), he told us about how uncommon it was for a patient to survive surgery in those early days of the field: “He tried some neurosurgery, but often ended up accidentally nicking a blood vessel and then it’s ‘you’re going to get very sleepy now’”. I left with the unsettling impression that surgery in the 18th century sounded a lot like making a recipe from scratch – trial and error.

If you’ve ever idly wondered what a slice of Einstein’s brain looks like, then the Mütter Museum is for you. So, basically everyone. It’s a medical smorgasbord, filled with oddities and ailments through time: atypical skeletons, preserved organs, a jar of human skin (why?!), and even a giant human colon. Perhaps more interesting was the history of how society responds to such anomalies, in an exhibit dedicated to the folklore and varied cultural attitudes surrounding birth defects across the world. No photos allowed, but check out their website for some extraordinary highlights!

As millennials we often forget what books look like, so it was a real treat to see the libraries. We marvelled at the mahogany grandeur of the Pennsylvania Hospital library, but my favourite was less insta-worthy (partly because pictures were ‘discouraged’). While half of the group looked through beautiful, hand-drawn anatomy pop-up texts, the rest of us were led along a meandering pathway through the College of Physicians of Philadelphia to a door reminiscent of a submarine airlock. We quietly filed into the largest collection of books I have ever set eyes on. It was a room of steel bookshelves, dusty and dimly lit, filled with medical literature and journals from the past. Peering through the holes in the floor, the stacks continued infinitely further down than my eyes, and frankly my brain, could comprehend. I tried to imagine all of the words below our feet, and thought it must be akin to what an astronaut feels looking back at the earth.

I know my words can’t compete with those of my medical ancestors hidden away in Philadelphia. But hopefully if you take anything from them, it’s an inkling of interest into the world behind us. Good and bad, whimsical, and downright gruesome at times, the history of medicine is incredibly important. Because, well, in the words of someone more eloquent than me “History never really says goodbye. History says ‘See you later.”

Oh and in case you were concerned, I did find time for a cheesesteak.

 

 

 

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Third annual History of Medicine Week starts April 23

The What Happened In Medicine (WHIM) Historical Society is proud to host the third annual History of Medicine Week! This year’s theme is inspired by Dr. Duffin’s Heroes & Villains assignment, where students must grapple with some controversial characters in our history. Students, Faculty, and Community members are all warmly welcomed to attend any and all events! Please join us during the week of April 23rd for four exciting events:

Museum of Healthcare Showcase 

Monday, April 23rd (8:30AM – 3:00PM)
Grande Corridor, New Medical Building, 15 Arch St.

Hero or Villain? You be the judge! Wander through the Grand Corridor of the New Medical Building and enjoy the showcase curated by the Museum of Healthcare. At your leisure, take a look at artifacts of some of history’s biggest medical heroes and villains.

Panel Discussion

Tuesday, April 24th (5:30PM – 7:30PM) 
132A, New Medical Building, 15 Arch St.
Don’t miss out on our most controversial event of the week! After a half hour period to gather refreshments and FREE food, a panel, moderated by the incredible Dr. Jenna Healey, resident Queen’s Hannah Chair of the History of Medicine, will question the basis for a designation of hero or villain. The panel will begin with Dr. Jaclyn Duffin, haematologist, historian, and past Hannah Chair of the History of Medicine, describing why and how she invented the Heroes and Villains project as an introduction both to history in medicine and to information literacy — with some of its triumphs and disasters. Next, Dr. Allison Morehead, Associate Professor and Graduate Coordinator of Art History at Queen’s University, will talk about Florence Nightingale and the “incursion” of women into the “fraternity” of medicine in the 19th and 20th centuries, as well as the ways in which historical accounts of Nightingale heroicize (or angelicize!) her to the exclusion of other figures in the history of nursing, such as Mary Seacole. Closing the panel is Edward Thomas, PhD candidate in Cultural Studies at Queen’s, will discuss his research examining Queen’s barring of black medical students between 1918 and 1964 in regards to how institutional narratives shape organizational memory and culture. 

Open Mic Night 

Wednesday, April 25th (7:00PM – 9:30PM)
The Grad Club, 162 Barrie St
Need an outlet for your historical arguments? Ready to re-enact your heroes and villain assignment? Want some free beer and endless historical entertainment? Come out to the Heroes & Villains: Open Mic Night! A relaxing event, some fantastic entertainment, and a wonderful evening spent with your Queen’s peers, what more can you ask for?!

Movie Night: History of Kingston Psychiatric Hospital

Thursday, April 26th (5:30PM – 7:30PM) 
032A, New Medical Building, 15 Arch St.

Don’t miss out on this weeks closing event! We will be screening the film “The History of KPH” by Queen’s Film Studies’ own Janice Belanger. Come to learn more about the Kingston Psychiatric Hospital, and have a relaxing end to this jam-packed week!

 

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Curriculum Committee Information – February 22, 2018

Faculty, staff, and students interested in attending Curriculum Committee meetings should contact the Committee Secretary, Candace Miller (umecc@queensu.ca), for information relating to agenda items and meeting schedules.

A meeting of the Curriculum Committee was held on February 22, 2018.  To review the topics discussed at this meeting, please click HERE to view the agenda.

Faculty interested in reviewing the minutes of the February 22 meeting can click HERE to be taken to the Curriculum Committee’s page located on the Faculty Resources Community of MEdTech Central.

Those who are directly impacted by any decisions made by the Curriculum Committee have been notified via email.

Students interested in the outcome of a decision or discussion are welcome to contact the Aesculapian Society’s Vice President, Academic, Justine Ring at vpacademic@qmed.ca.

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The Evolution of SPs and The Standardized Patient & OSCE Program

Open House at Queen’s School of Medicine

Clinical Teaching Centre

Monday, March 26 from 1:00-4:00 pm

By Kate Slagle, SP & OSCE Program Manager

When I’m out in public and people ask what I do, I tell them what a standardized patient is which is typically met with a perplexed look to which my husband chimes in with, “Have you ever seen that episode of Seinfeld where Kramer works with the medical students?”

Although this parallel makes me slightly cringe they start to think about how standardized patients (SPs) — actors who are trained to convincingly portray the physical, historical and emotional features of a real person for educational purposes — can be applied across all fields.

For the past five years I have had the privilege of managing the Queen’s SP & OSCE Program and on a daily basis get to see the rewards SP simulation provides our students, such as:

  • Improved interviewing skills
  • Gained confidence in discussing difficult topics and de-escalating conflict
  • Empathy to deliver difficult news
  • Refined physical exam techniques and maneuvers
  • Next level, critical thinking
  • Constructive feedback and much more!

Over the past few years the request for SP encounters within the Faculty of Health Sciences has exponentially increased as well as interest from organizations outside the university. The time came when we had to ask ourselves, “What do we need to do to take our program to the next level and offer SP services outside the Faculty of Health Sciences?”

If we were going to expand we wanted to do things right. Over the past year we’ve been working with the university to formally expand the program to:

  • Continue to provide high quality SP sessions and work in partnership to develop new sessions within the Faculty of Health Sciences.
  • Offer SP services to the wider university and Kingston community.

The infrastructure is now in place and we’re ready to open our doors. The launch is set to begin this month with an open house for new and existing clients at the Queen’s School of Medicine Clinical Teaching Centre on Monday, March 26, 2018 from 1:00-4:00pm.

Although during the open house you won’t be hearing from Kramer, you’ll be able to hear from real SPs and learn more about what the program has to offer. We look forward to seeing you then.

Important Links

Facebook event link: https://www.facebook.com/events/155933065095723/

Queen’s Event Calendar Link: http://www.queensu.ca/eventscalendar/calendar/events/standardized-patient-osce-program-open-house

SP & OSCE Program Website: https://meds.queensu.ca/academics/spprogram

Video linkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lDd6vsmLhwg

The Burning” is the 172nd episode of the NBC sitcom Seinfeld. It aired on March 19, 1998.

 

 

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2018 KHSC Exceptional Healer named

[Italics indicates hyperlink]

We wrote about the Kingston Health Sciences Centre Exceptional Healer Award last fall (link here) encouraging nominations for the second iteration of the award which recognizes a physician who demonstrates in clinical practices the core concepts of patient- and family-centred care: dignity and respect, information sharing, participation, and collaboration. It’s sponsored by the KHSC Patient & Family Advisory Council.

In February, Dr. Shawna Johnston was named the 2018 winner of the award. Dr. Johnston was praised by the selection committee for putting patients and families at the centre of care.

(Left to Right) Patient Experience Advisor Sue Bedell, Chief of Staff Dr. Michael Fitzpatrick and Dr. Shawna Johnston Credit: Matthew Manor/KHSC From: http://www.kgh.on.ca/kghconnect/news/privileged-be-her-patient

Patients, families and staff nominated 21 physicians for the award. Thirty-four nominations were receive, with about 25 percent coming from KHSC staff. (Medical students are included in the “staff” category and may submit nominations). This annual award was created by the Patient & Family Advisory Council to honour physicians of KHSC for demonstrating the core concepts of patient and family-centred care (PFCC) in their clinical practice. These concepts are: dignity and respect, information sharing, participation, and collaboration.

Dr. Johnston, a urogynecologist and international expert on vaginal health, was cited for providing the highest respect and empathy for her patients who deal with pelvic floor disorders such as organ prolapse and urinary incontinence.

One patient wrote: “She took her time and explained the surgical procedure. She was innovative in drawing diagrams for me and allowed time for me to ingest this information and to ask as many questions as I needed. I never felt rushed.”

Dr. Johnston was also praised for treating family members as partners and “an extension of the clinical team.” It was also noted that Dr. Johnston models these behaviours to residents. This, one patient noted “is a gift from her to future practicing physicians and to the communities that will welcome them.”

Dr. Johnston works with Queen’s medical students in MEDS 443, the Obstetrics & Gynecology clerkship rotation. Herself a graduate of Queen’s School of Medicine, Dr. Johnston said that she was trained to be a good listener by the late Dr. Neil Piercy.

“I was taught to always put myself in my patient’s shoes, especially when surgery is involved,” she told KGH Connect. “It’s a big decision, and you can’t take a one-size-fits-all approach. That’s why my patients help me to decide what will work best for them. I’m always open to more questions—I spend a lot of time on the phone—because the patient needs to buy into the treatment. Otherwise, it’s not good care.”

“Families play a big part in treatment decisions because they’re the ones supporting the patient at home,” she added. “The choices we make need to work from both the patient and care provider perspective.”

Patient Experience Advisor Sue Bedell, chair of the award selection committee, was delighted by the staff support for the award. “It shows that fellow caregivers, along with patients and families, deeply appreciate physicians who provide respectful and compassionate health care.

Other physicians nominated for the award were:

  • Dr. Manny Bal
  • Dr. Michael Brundage
  • Dr. Barry Chan
  • Dr. Jay Engel
  • Dr. Michael Flavin
  • Dr. Michael Leveridge
  • Dr. Peter MacPherson
  • Dr. Laura Marcotte
  • Dr. Andrea Moore
  • Dr. David Reed
  • Dr. Michael O’Reilly
  • Dr. Mark Ropeleski
  • Dr. Robert Siemens
  • Dr. Sid Srivastava
  • Dr. Yi Ning Johanna Strube
  • Dr. Benjamin Thompson
  • Dr. Anna Tomiak
  • Dr. Naji Touma
  • Dr. Brent Wolfrom
  • Dr. David Yen

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Curriculum Committee Information – November 23, 2017 & February 1, 2018

Faculty, staff, and students interested in attending Curriculum Committee meetings should contact the Committee Secretary, Candace Miller (umecc@queensu.ca), for information relating to agenda items and meeting schedules.

A meeting of the Curriculum Committee was held on November 23, 2017.  To review the topics discussed at this meeting, please click HERE to view the agenda.

A meeting of the Curriculum Committee was held on February 1, 2018.  To review the topics discussed at this meeting, please click HERE to view the agenda.

Faculty interested in reviewing the minutes of the November and February meetings can click HERE to be taken to the Curriculum Committee’s page located on the Faculty Resources Community of MEdTech Central.

Those who are directly impacted by any decisions made by the Curriculum Committee have been notified via email.

Students interested in the outcome of a decision or discussion are welcome to contact the Aesculapian Society’s Vice President, Academic, Justine Ring at vpacademic@qmed.ca.

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“Lifestyle as Medicine” Symposium February 12

By Daniel Rusiecki and Leah Allen (Meds 2021), “Lifestyle as Medicine” Symposium co-organizers

 

“The doctor of the future will give no medication, but will interest his patients in the care of the human frame, diet and in the cause and prevention of disease.” Thomas A. Edison

However far-fetched Mr. Edison’s vision may be, the idea of the first line of treatment being the intrinsic care of the human body and what we put into it is not off the mark whatsoever. Being the new kid on the block in first-year medical school, travelling through this area of modern medicine has one questioning how much exogenous medication would be needed if our society hasn’t progressed the way it has. What if cars never existed, and everyone had to walk to their daily job? Would over 20% of our Canadian population still be classified as obese? What if our food didn’t come out of a factory, or from a fast-food restaurant drive-thru window? Would we still be dealing with a diabetes epidemic where 3.4 million of our sisters, brothers, parents, friends and neighbours are injecting themselves with insulin  daily? The questions can go on and on, but they don’t answer one vital question: how do we move forward?

Practicing physicians will have approximately 2200 patient visits per year. With a career length of 35 years that’s almost 80,000 opportunities to influence the health and lives of these individuals. It’s crazy to think about how much influence one future physician can have, let alone the whole Queen’s undergraduate cohort, the residents, and affiliated physicians. If you are a future physician or practicing physician reading this post, would you rather prescribe your patient medication for their hypertension when they are 45 years old, or have the skills and knowledge to help them prevent hypertension when they are 30?

Equipping our workforce with the knowledge, skills and fearlessness to invoke a healthy lifestyle change is at the root of how we can move forward. Not only can we prolong and enhance the lives of our patients directly, but we can advocate to improve societal systems as a whole. We also have the opportunity to reduce the cost of our healthcare over the long-term due to the reduction of drug prescriptions and improvements in health of the general population.

The “Lifestyle as Medicine” symposium will be the start of a journey to better equip future or practicing physicians with the artillery necessary for these changes. The symposium will be take place Monday, February 12 from 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. in the School of Medicine Building, room 132A.

Dr. Robert Ross, a prominent researcher in the area of diabetes and related co-morbidities will speak on how cardiorespiratory fitness can be a significant vital sign for a patient’s health status. Andrea Brennan, a registered dietitian, will then take the floor to deliver key nutritional principles every physician should know, as well as shed light on current diet trends and the evidence supporting them. Dr. Chris Frank, a geriatric and palliative care physician, will then give insight on how he maintains healthy habits while being a busy physician. Finally, to get a taste of the patients perspective, Doug Dowling will speak about his passion for fitness and how the diagnosis of Crohn’s disease in his early 20s impacted him.

We hope you will join us for this thought-provoking, educational event.

 

 

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