Medical Students as Researchers, Part 2–a complete list

Last week, Dr. Sanfilippo wrote about our medical students who have been part of research projects and studies.  He promised a list of all of our students who have been first authors of studies published or in progress.

Before we bring you to the list, we’d like to correct an error in the last blog–two of the articles by students got blended into one in our Excel spreadsheet.

Here are the two separate articles, with apologies to the authors and thanks to Yan Sim for helping us correct this:

Ross GA, Mihok ML, Murrant CL.  Extracellular adenosine initiates rapid arteriolar vasodilation induced by a single skeletal muscle contraction in hamster cremaster muscle.  Acta Physiol (Oxf) (2013).

and

Sim AY, Hopman W, Engen D, Silva M, James, P.  Predicting operative bleeding in elective pediatric surguries using the pediatric bleeding questionnaire.  Journal of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology (2013).

 

And here’s the full list as far as we could ascertain from students’ MSPRs, (Brace yourselves!  It’s a great and long list!) in alphabetical order by first author all 123 publications:

Badowski, M., Boyd, G., Day, A., Ilan, R.  Factors Associated with Failure to Diagnose Delirium in the ICU: An Observational Study. Intensive Care Medicine (Publication Pending)

Baylis, J.B., Fernando, S.M., Szulewski, A., and Howes, D.W.  Data Gathering in Resuscitation Scenarios: Novice Versus Expert Physicians. Canadian Journal of Emergency Medicine (2013)

Cameron P, Ellis PM, Pond GR, Goffin. Do beta-blockers alter dyspnea and fatigue in advanced lung cancer? A retrospective analysis. JR. Palliat Med (2012)

Cameron, P. et al. A comparison of patient knowledge of clinical trials and trialist priorities. Current Oncology (2013)

Campbell AB, McIntyre WF, Baranchuk A. Ventricular Tachycardia in a Patient with Repaired Tetralogy of Fallot. J Gen Pract (2013)

Chang, J., Sohaib M., Shafeequr, S., Baranchuk, A., Morris, C.,Reilly, M., Raveen S. Pal. Atrial Thrombi Detection Prior to Pulmonary Vein Isolation: Cardiac Computer Tomography Versus Transesophageal Echocardiography. Journal of American College of Cardiology (2013)

Cho C.K., Drabovich A.P., Batruch I., Diamandis E.P. Verification of a biomarker discovery approach for detection of Down syndrome in amniotic fluid via multiplex selected reaction monitoring (SRM) assay. Journal of Proteomics. (2011)

Cho C.K., Diamandis E.P. Application of proteomics to prenatal screening and diagnosis for aneuploidies. Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (2011)

Cho C.K., Smith C.R., Diamandis E.P. Amniotic fluid proteome analysis from Down Syndrome pregnancies for biomarker discovery. Journal of Proteome Research (2010)

Cho C.K., Shan S.J., Winsor E.J., Diamandis E.P. Proteomics analysis of human amniotic fluid. Molecular & Cellular Proteomics (2007)

Climans, S.A., Melanson M., Desai J.A. To the Editor: A Case of Collet-Sicard Syndrome Caused by Necrotizing Otitis Externa. The Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences (2013)

Climans, S.A., Murphy J.A., Evans G.A., Shamseddin M.K. Renal Failure, Hepatitis, and Myocarditis in a Previously Healthy Man. The Canadian Journal of Infectious Diseases & Medical Microbiology (2013) (publication pending)

Cusimano, M., Pudwell, J., Roddy, M., Cho, C.K., Smith, G.N. The Maternal Health Clinic: An Initiative for Cardiovascular Risk Identification in Women with Pregnancy-Related Complications. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology (publication pending)

Di Pierdomenico A., et al. Brucellosis in a returned traveller. CMAJ (2011 )

Dossa F., Gao F.Q., Scott C.J.M., Black S.E. Relationship between white matter hyperintensities and hippocampal atrophy in Alzheimer Disease. Canadian Journal of Geriatrics (2009)

Dossa F., Tator C.H. Concussions in Rugby: A review of risk factors, awareness, and prevention strategies. British Journal of Sports Medicine (submitted)

Eid L., Heim K., Doucette S., McCloskey S., Duffy, A., Grof, P. Bipolar disorder and socioeconomic status: What is the nature of this relationship? International Journal of Bipolar Disorders (2013)

Fage B.A., Seitz D.P., Gill S.S., Herrmann N., Smailagic N., Chan C.C.H., Nikolaou V. Mini‑Cog for the diagnosis of Alzheimers disease dementia and other dementias within a community setting Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (In Press)

Farrell, R., Rogers, E., Jumma, K. Women in Medicine Evening Inaugural Meeting. Queen’s Medicine Review (2011)

Farrell, R. Renee’s Run. Current Spina Bifda and Hydrocephalus Association of Ontario Quarterly Magazine (2008)

Fernando S.M., Rao, P., Niel, L., Chatterjee, D., Stagljar, M., Monks, D.A. Myocyte androgen receptors increase metabolic rate and improve body composition by reducing fat mass. Endocrinology (2010)

Ferrara, S., Bradi, A., Pokrupa, R. Decreasing neurologic consequences in patients with spinal infection: the testing of a novel diagnostic guide-line. Canadian Journal of Surgery (2012)

Ferrara, S., Leveridge, M. Content Analysis and Predictive Factors in 3288 Patients’ Online Ratings of Urologists. Canadian Urological Association Journal (2013)

Fitzpatrick, A.M., Gao, L.L., Smith B.L., Cetrulo, C.L., Cowell, A.S., Winograd, J.M., Yaremchuk, M.J., Austen, W.G., Liao, E.C. Cost and Outcome Analysis of Breast Reconstruction Paradigm Shift.  Annals of Plastic Surgery (2013)

Fitzpatrick, A.M.  Cost and Outcome Analysis of Breast Reconstruction Paradigm Shift. Canadian Society of Plastic Surgeons. Podium presentation (May, 2013)

Fitzpatrick, A. M. Cost and Outcome Analysis of Breast Reconstruction Paradigm Shift. American Society of Plastic Surgeons. Podium presentation. (October, 2012)

Fitzpatrick, A. M. Cost and Outcome Analysis of Breast Reconstruction Paradigm Shift with Increased Incidence of Prophylactic Mastectomy. New England Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeons. Podium presentation (June ,2012)

Fitzpatrick, A.M., McKay, D.R., Levine, R. Abdominoplasty: Do Multiple Versus Single Drains Impact Seroma Incidence. Journal of Plastic, Reconstruction and Aesthetic Surgery (2013)

Fitzpatrick, A.M., Jokic, R., Depression and Sleep Apnea: Investigating the Links. Synergy (2009)

Garg, V., Tsrigotis, D., Dickson, J., Dalamagas, C., Bonneau, D., Latter, D.A., Verma, S., Peterson, M.D. Direct Innominate Artery Cannulation for Selective Antegrade Cerebral Perfusion during Deep Hypothermic Circulatory Arrest in Aortic Surgery. Journal of Thoracic Cardiovascular Surgery (2013)

Ginsberg, D., Dagnone, D., Hall, A., Sivilotti, M. Validation of a Novel Method for Determining the Effects of Fatigue on Emergency Medicine Clinical Decision Making in Trainees. Can Med Education Journal (2013)

Ginsberg, D., Pang, R. Duty Hours and Fatigue in Canadian Medical Clerks. Academic Medicine (2013)

Ginbserg, D.,  Sivilotti, M., Hall, A., Dagnone, J. The Sleep Habits of Junior Residents and Medical Students Working in the Emergency Department. Can J Emerg Med 2013. Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians Annual Scientific Assembly (2013)

Ginsberg, D., Lavie, P., Lavie, L. A Novel Method for Detecting Nuclear Localization of Transcription Factors in Blood Leukocytes. Master’s Thesis. Technion University Press (2010)

Ginsberg, D. An Unidentified Monster in the Bed. Assessing Nocturnal Asthma in Children. McGill Journal of Medicine (2009)

Gray, Alia, et al. An Anatomically Shaped Coronoid Prosthesis Restores Stability of the Coronoid Deficient Elbow: An In-Vitro Biomechanical Study. Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery, British (2012)

Gray, A.B., et al. The Effect of a Coronoid Prosthesis on Restoring Stability to the Coronoid-Deficient Elbow: A Biomechanical Study. The Journal of Hand Surgery (2013).

Joundi, R. A., et al. Driving Oscillatory Activity in the Human Cortex Enhances Motor Performance. Current Biology (2012)

Joundi, R. A., et al. Oscillatory Activity in the Subthalamic Nucleus during Arm Reaching in Parkinson’s Disease. Experimental Neurology (2012)

Joundi, R. A., et al. Persistent Suppression of Subthalamic Beta-Band Activity during Rhythmic Finger Tapping in Parkinson’s Disease. Clinical Neurophysiology (2013)

Joundi, R. A., et al. High-Frequency Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus Selectively Decreases Central Variance of Rhythmic Finger Tapping in Parkinson’s Disease. Neuropsychologia (2012)

Joundi, R. A., et al. Rapid Tremor Frequency Assessment with the iPhone Accelerometer. Parkinsonism and Related Disorders (2011)

Joundi, R.A. Enhancing Motor Performance in the Healthy and Parkinsonian Brain:  Adaptation, Oscillations, and Electrical Stimulation. PhD Thesis.  Oxford University, UK.

The thesis explored the neurophysiological underpinnings of motor activity in humans, with a focus on Parkinson’s disease.  Experiments involved recording of electrical activity from the basal ganglia of Parkinson’s patients with implanted deep brain electrodes, as well as using invasive and non-invasive electrical stimulation to improve motor output.  The main thrust of the work is demonstrating the importance of neuronal oscillations in the generation of movement.

Khan, M., Saheb, H., Fellman, R., Harasymowycz, P., Vest, Z., Neelakantan, A., Ahmed, I. Comparison of Combined Cataract Surgery with iStent versus Trabectome.  Manuscript submitted to Ophthalmology; Journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. (2013)

Khan, M., Ahmed, I. A.. Multi-Centre Study Evaluating the Visual Outcomes and Reduction of Astigmatism in Patients Following Bilateral Implantation of the Tecnis Toric 1-piece IOL. (Study trial in progress)

Khan, M., and Campochiaro, P. Effects of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor on Central Retinal Vein Occlusion. (Manuscript in preparation)

Khan, M., O’Reilly, M., Sanfilippo, T., Johri, A., Kafka, H., Londry, C., Pal, R. Development of a novel evaluation tool for assessment of competence in Level 1 echocardiography following focused training. Scholarship of Health Sciences Education Symposium, Queen’s School of Medicine. (2012)

Khan M. Health Care Transformation – A Nationwide Discussion. Canadian Federation of Medical Students Position Paper. (2012)

Khan M. and Sen. Segal, H. Health Access in Rural Canada. Senate of Canada Research Paper (2006)

Khan, M., Lalani, N., Plamadeala, C., Sun, E., Gardner, B. Highlights: on Health Care for the Uninsured and Undocumented. The Wellesley Institute (2010).

Khan M et al. Wading Through Wait Times; What Do Meaningful Reductions and Guarantees Mean? Health Council of Canada Annual Report (2007)

Kokorovic, A., Cheung, G.W., Breen, D.M., Chari, M., Lam, C.K., Lam, T.K. Duodenal mucosal protein kinase regulates glucose production in rats. Gastroenterology (2011)

Kokorovic, A., Cheung, G.W., Lam, T.K. Upper intestinal lipids regulate glucose production. Cellular and Molecular Life Science (2008) [Co-first authors]

Kokorovic, A., Cheung, G.W., Lam T.K. Hypothalamic sensing of circulating lactate regulates glucose production. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine (2009)

Koppikar, S., Baranchuk, A., Guzman, J.C., and Morillo, C. Stroke and Ventricular Arrhythmias. International Journal of Cardiology (2013)

Koppikar, S., Shaw, C., and Baranchuk, A. Electrocardiogram quiz: A tale of an abnormal ECG,.Journal of Electrocardiology (2013)

Koumpan, Y., VanDenKerkhof, E., Van Vlymen, J., An observational cohort study to assess glycosylated hemoglobin screening for elective surgical patients (in preparation)

Kroll, R.R., Collie, M.R., Lacroix, J., Doumit, J., Mamelak, A. Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer in Ontario Part 1: Total Claims from 2003- 2009. Proc. of 87th Annual Canadian Dermatology Association Conference, Ottawa. Canadian Dermatology Association (2012)

Kroll, R. R., Grossman, R. F Pulmonary Blastomycosis in a Professional Diver: An Occupational Risk. Canadian Respiratory Journal (2013)

Kroll, R., Flood, D., Srigley, J., Desquamative Interstitial Pneumonitis in a Non-Smoker: A Rare Diagnosis Canadian Respiratory Journal (2013)

Kurji, A., Faazil, K., Sourabh, A., Kiage, D., Giorgis A.T., Mulugeta, A., Damji K.J. Preventing and Treating Avoidable Blindness from Glaucoma in Sub-Saharan Africa with Telemedicine (in preparation)

Kurji, A.K., Koppikar, S., Khalid-Khan, S. A Case of QTc Prolongation in a 13-year-old Boy on Escitalopram for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (In progress)

Lacombe, S. P., Goodman, J.M., Spragg, C.M., Liu, S., Thomas, S.G. Interval and Continuous Exercise Elicit Equivalent Postexercise Hypotension in Prehypertensive Men, Despite Differences in Regulation. Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism (2011)

Lacombe, S., LaHaye, S., Hopkins-Rosseel, D., Ball, D., Lau, W. Identifying Patients at Low Risk for Activity Related Events: The RARE Score. Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention (2013)

Leitch, J., Figley, C., Stroman, P. Applying fMRI to the brainstem and spinal cord. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (2010)

Leitch, J., Cahill, C., and Stroman, P. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of peripheral neuropathic pain in the human spinal cord and brainstem. Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (2013)

Lo, C.C., Schwartz, J.A., Johnson, D.J., Yu, M., Aidarus, N., Mujib, S., Benko, E., Hyrcza, M., Kovacs, C., Ostrowski, M.A. HIV delays IFN-alpha production from human plasmacytoid dendritic cells and is associated with SYK phosphorylation. PLoS One (2012)

Lopez, A.S. Taking a second: reflection on social pediatrics.  Scrub-In (2013)

Lopez, A.S. Exploring the Suitability of a Specific Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonist as a Tool in the Study of the Regulation of Rat Lung Alveolarization by Glucocorticoids. MSc Thesis. Toronto: University of Toronto. Library and Archives Canada Catalogue, Electronic Resource (2010)

Luckett-Gatopoulos, S. Investigating the impact of teacher variables in a reading intervention program.  Undergraduate thesis Electronic (2007)

Luckett-Gatopoulos, S., Conative Factors in the Context of Adolescent Reading Remediation. Master of Science thesis Electronic (2010)

Luckett-Gatopoulos, S., Dinsdale, H. Treatment of migraine using ergot compounds: An historical perspective (Pending publication)

Luckett-Gatopoulos, S., Taylor, S. Should dabigatran-anticoagulated acute stroke patients receive tPA? A review of the evidence (Pending publication)

Lun, G., Atenafu, E.G., Knox, J.J., Sridhar, S.S., Tannock, I.F., Joshua, A.M. Use of a Clinical Assistant to Screen Patients with Genitourinary Cancer to Encourage Entry into Clinical Trials and use of Supportive Medication: A Pilot Project at a Canadian Cancer Center. Clinical Genitourinary Cancer  (2013)

Mazzetti, A., Borici-Mazi R. Childhood chronic urticaria and type 1 diabetes. Allergy Asthma & Clin Immunol (2011)

Mohajer, K., Fregeau, B., Garg, V., et. al. Management of Atrial Fibrillation by Canadian Electrophysiologists After Early Termination of the PALLAS Study. Can J Cardiol (2013)

Mohajer, K., and Sydor, D. Ultrasound Guided Central Venous Catheter Placement. Online Module, Published online at Queen’s Department of Anesthesia Website. Link: https://qshare.queensu.ca/Groups/School%20of%20Medicine/Assets/Public/Storyline/central-line/ (2013)

Mohajer, K., Cheng, J., Siu, J., et al. Signal Averaged versus 12-Lead Electrocardiography in Measuring QRS Duration for Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy, the Role of Ventricular Late Potentials. (in preparation)

Mohajer, K., Haley, C., Simpson, C., et al. Efficacy Of Periprocedural Dabigatran For Patients Undergoing Pulmonary Vein Isolation For Atrial Fibrillation (in preparation)

Mok, D., Wilson, R., Petsikas, D., Saha, T. Prevalence and patient impact of chronic post-sternotomy pain after coronary artery bypass graft. Canadian Journal of Anesthesia (Pending publication)

Mok, D. Of Helium and Happiness. Queen’s Medical Review (2012)

Munir, S., Patil, K., Miller, E., Uleryk, E., Twilt, M., Spiegel, L., Doria, A.S. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis of Axial Joints: A Systematic Review on the Diagnostic Accuracy and Predictive Value of Conventional MRI. American Journal of Roentgenology (In Press)

Munir, S., Patil, K., Miller, E., Uleryk, E., Twilt, M., Spiegel, L., Doria, A.S. Evidence-Based Outcomes of Studies Addressing Diagnostic Accuracy of MRI of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis in the Axial Skeleton – A Systematic Review. Pediatric Radiology (2013)

Munir, S., Koppikar, S., Hopman, W.M., Boag, A., Flood, J., Salahudeen, S., Nolan, R. Efficacy of CT Guided Core Needle Biopsy of Subsolid Pulmonary Nodules. Journal of Thoracic Imaging (Submitted)

Munir, S., Chang, J.H., Salahudeen, S., Baranchuk, A., Morris, C., O’Reilly, M., Pal, R.S. Atrial Thrombi Detection prior to Pulmonary Vein Isolation Diagnostic Accuracy of Cardiac Computer Tomography Versus Transesophageal Echocardiography. Journal of American College of Cardiology Cardiovascular Imaging. (Submitted)

Narducci, L., Horgan, S., Khalid-Khan, S. Exploring how Facebook may contribute to anxiety in adolescents with anxiety disorders (in preparation)

Narducci, L., Horgan, S., Khalid-Khan, S. Exploring how Facebook may contribute to anxiety in adolescents with anxiety disorders. (in preparation)

O’Loghlen, S., Pickett, W., Janssen, I. Active transportation environments surrounding Canadian schools. Can J Public Health (2011)

Osumek, J.E., Revesz, A., Morton, J.S., Davidge, S.T., Hardy, D.B. Enhanced Trimethylation of Histone H3 Mediates Impaired Expression of Hepatic Glucose 6-Phosphatase Expression in Offspring From Rat Dams Exposed to Hypoxia During Pregnancy. Reproductive Sciences (2013)

Ramsey, J.B., Ramer, L.M., Inskip, J.A., Alan, N., Ramer, M.S., Krassioukov, A.V.  Care of Rats with Complete High-Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury.  J Neurotrauma (2010)

Rogers, E., Wang B.X., Cui, Z., Rowley D.R., Ressler S., Vyakarnam, A., Fish, E.   A Host Factor That Influences the Neutrophil Response to Murine Hepatitis Virus (MHV) 1 Infection Antiviral Research.  Antiviral Res (2012)

Rogers, E., Casadiego-Cubides, G., Lacy, J., Gerstle, J.T., Kives, S., Allen, L. Preoperative Risk Stratification of Adnexal Masses: Can We Predict the Optimal Surgical Management? Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology (2013)

Rogers, E., Allen, L., Kives, S. The Recurrence Rate of Ovarian Dermoid Cysts in Pediatric and Adolescent Girls. Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology (2013)

Ross, G.A., Mihok, M.L., Murrant, C.L. Extracellular adenosine initiates rapid arteriolar vasodilation induced by a single skeletal muscle contraction in hamster cremaster muscle. Acta Physiologica (Oxford) (2013)

Ross, G.A., Hoffman, W., MacGillivray, T.E., Sundt, T.M. Evaluation of a post-operative fluid resuscitation protocol in adult cardiac surgery patients at an academic medical centre. (Publication pending)

Ross, G.A., Howes, D.  Comparison of fluid flow rates of common resuscitative fluids through cannulas of varying gauges. (Publication pending)

Rumman, A., Gee, K., White, C.A., Wobeser, W.L. Estimation of glomerular filtration rate using serum cystatin C and beta-trace protein in HIV patients. Antiviral Therapy (2012)

Rumman, A., O’Loghlen, S., Rutherford, K., Priesman, M., Raboud, J., Wobeser, W. Predictors of Antiretroviral Treatment Initiation among Foreign-born HIV patients in Ontario. Can J Infect Dis Med Microbiol (2010)

Rumman, A., Mueses, H., Galindo, J., Agudelo, J.F. Martinez-Cajas, J.L. How would the Oligonucleotide Ligation Assay (OLA) perform if used in Colombia for detection of HIV drug resistance? Can J Infect Dis Med Microbiol (2012)

Rumman, A., Sadeghi, A., Zagdyn, Z., Hopman, W., Cox, D., Pankovich, J., Rosenes, R., Cooper, C., Frolova, O.,  Balasanyants, G., Wobeser, W.L. Delayed Screening and Advanced Presentation of Tuberculosis in HIV-infected Prisoners and Homeless Persons in a Multi-Centre Russian Cohort Study. Can J Infect Dis Med Microbiol (2013)

Sim, AY., Bowman, M., Hopman, W., Engen, D., Silva, M., James, P. Predicting in Elective Pediatric Surgeries using the Pediatric Bleeding Questionnaire (PBQ). Journal of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology. (2013)

Squissato, V., Brown, G.D. Five Things You Should Know About Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. Canadian Medical Association Journal. (publication pending)

Squissato, V., From Vanity to Sanity: The Legitimization of Plastic Surgery. History of Medicine Conference (2012)

Sudenis, T., Hall, K., Cartotto, R.C. Enteral nutrition: What the dietician prescribes isn’t what the patient gets! Journal of Burn Care and Research (2013)

Herrmann N, Tam D.Y., Balshaw, R., Sambrook, R., Lesnikova, N., Lanctôt K.L., COSID Investigators. The relation between disease severity and cost of caring for patients with Alzheimer’s disease in Canada. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry (2010)

Tohidi, M., Robinson, L., Graham, T., Smith, G. Effect of Caffeine Ingestion on Fetal Heart Rate Activity. J Obstet Gynaecol Can (2013)

Tohidi, M. The Effects of Exogenous Estrogens on Estrogen Receptors in Male Reproductive Organs. Interdisciplinary Journal of Health Sciences (2010)

Tryphonopoulos, T., Lim, R., Poonai, N. Serum Bicarbonate as a Predictor of adverse Outcomes in the Pediatric Emergency Department (in preparation)

Urbanellis, P., Wang, J., Shalev, I., He, W., Adeyi, O., Phillips, M.J., Bartczak, A., Grant, D.R., Levy, G.A. Rapamycin promotes tolerance through increased expression of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and impaired development of CD8+CD44+CD62L+ memory T cells. The Journal of Immunology (2010)

Wang, J.G., McIntyre, W.F., Kong, W., Baranchuk, A. Electrocution-induced Brugada phenocopy. Int J Cardiol (2012)

Wang, J.G., Abreu, C.C., Milne, B., Rooney, R., Saha, T. The role of modified electroconvulsive therapy in improving quality of life in a patient with metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma. Journal of Electroconvulsive Therapy (2013)

Wang, M., Reid, D. Using virtual reality to improve contextual processing in children with autism. Come to Your Senses: Creating Supportive Environments to Nurture the Sensory Capital Within. Ed. Nehama Baum. Toronto: Muki Baum Association (2009)

Wang, M., Reid, D. The Virtual Reality-Cognitive Rehabilitation (VR-CR) Approach for Children with Autism; Journal of CyberTherapy and Rehabilitation (2009)

Wang, M., Reid, D. Virtual Reality in Pediatric Neurorehabilitation: Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Autism and Cerebral Palsy. Neuroepidemiology (2010)

Wang, M., Gladman, D., Ibanez, D., Urowitz, M. Long-term outcome of early neuropsychiatric events due to active disease in systemic lupus erythematosus. Arthritis Care & Research (2012)

Wang, M., Anagnostou, E. Using Virtual Reality as a Treatment Tool for Children with Autism. The Comprehensive Guide to Autism Springer Reference (2013)

Wang, M., Reid, D. Using the Virtual Reality-Cognitive Rehabilitation (VR-CR) Approach to Improve Contextual Processing in Children with Autism. The Scientific World Journal (2013).

Worley, B., Sack, J., Gibson, M. Recognition, Prevention and Management of Ulcers,  Educational Module. (2011)

Worley, B., Alhusayen, R., Miranda, V. H1-Histamine Antagonists for the Treatment of Chronic Idiopathic Urticaria: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. (in preparation)

Worley, B., Pratt, M. Patch Testing in Contact Dermatitis: From Theory to Therapy. Monograph.23rd World Congress in Dermatology (in preparation)

Worley, B., Glassman, S.J. Unusual morphing keratodermatosis following hydroxyurea therapy for essential thrombocythemia (in preparation)

 

 

 

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Dr. Paul Belliveau awarded the The John Provan Outstanding Canadian Surgical Educator Award

One of Queen’s own surgical specialists, Dr. Paul Belliveau was awarded the The John Provan Outstanding Canadian Surgical Educator Award, which is given to recognize outstanding contributions to undergraduate surgical education in Canada.

belliveau_small

Dr. Belliveau learned of the distinction at the November 14-16, 2013 CUSEC Symposium held in Ottawa, Ontario.  The award  is sponsored by the Canadian Association of Surgical Chairpersons and was first presented in 1993. The award is a First Nations sculpture, which is presented to, and will remain in the custody of, the award winner for a period of two years. Each award recipient will have her/his name permanently affixed to the award. A smaller version of the same sculpture will remain with the award recipient.

Dr. Belliveau is a dedicated surgeon who is also dedicated to his students and to improving the curriculum in undergraduate medical education.  He has served for many years as a member of the UG Curriculum Committee, and as a Course Director in year two of medical school, where he began the implementation of small group learning as a teaching/learning method.  Dr. Belliveau has also served as a Course Director in Clerkship, as well as a frequent and well-regarded teacher of surgery. He has served as Chair, Undergraduate Surgical Education Committee, a member of the UG Admissions Committee, and a founding member of the UG Evaluation and Assessment Committee.   Currently, Dr. Belliveau serves as Chair of the Awards Committee for student awards in undergraduate medical education.
Congratulations to Dr. Belliveau on receiving this recognition!

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Understanding Competency Based Education
Lessons from an unlikely source

I was recently asked to speak at a conference on the topic of Competency Based Education.  My assignment was to provide definitions of that topic and to discuss the advantages and challenges associated with developing such an approach in an undergraduate medical program.

graph-nov12My search for a universally accepted definition of CBE began with a call to Theresa Suart, Educational Developer, who promptly alerted me to the reality that no such thing exists and, in fact, I had stumbled into an area of considerable controversy.  She directed me to helpful references, including a 2010 paper by Jason Frank and colleagues (Medical Teacher 32; 631-637) that is actually a systematic review of published definitions!  They reviewed a total of no fewer than 173 published definitions and, as illustrated in this table from their paper, the topic has been attracting increasing interest in recent years.  All this leads me to doubt the practical utility or relevance of a topic that so many bright people have difficulty even defining.  However, one becomes accustomed to such dilemmas when venturing into the world of medical education, and begins to view such uncertainties as opportunities to re-examine basic principles and search for patterns or examples of prior success that may be applicable.

Screen Shot 2013-11-11 at 2.36.58 PMThe principle I always find useful in assessing educational change is the fundamental triad of associations between Objectives, Learning and Assessment.  One of my first practical lessons in curricular design (and accreditation standards) is that these three components must be closely linked if any medical curriculum is to be effective.  Objectives must drive instruction and learning, and assessment must be linked to the teaching provided and the stated objectives.

 

With this in mind, I searched for a simple example that might help advance our understanding of Competency Based Education.  A conversation with one of my nieces who’d recently completed her Driver’s Education course provided that example.  The granting of a Driver’s License is, in fact, recognition of a competence for which there exists an easily understood and widely accepted global objective, specifically the ability to safely operate an automobile.  That global objective requires a body of knowledge, skills and personal CanDriveattributes which, with apologies to the Royal College and with tongue firmly in cheek, could be expressed as the CanDRIVE competency domains, which centre around a body of knowledge and understanding (the Driving Expert) but require additional attributes, such as (we might conjecture) Judgement, fundamental Literacy, physical Coordination, Social Accountability, Alertness (no cell phones) and Sobriety.  The knowledge component is completely and clearly articulated by the Ministry of Transportation in the Driver’s Manual, and the assessment of competencies is demonstrated in three parts, a written examination with questions taken directly from the manual, a cursory visual assessment involving recognition of traffic signs, and a performance based driving test during which the candidate must demonstrate the global objective (drive the car) while exhibiting the component competency domains (show up sober, pay attention, etc…).

And so, two parts of the educational triad are provided.  The true brilliance of the Ministry of Transportation however, is in how they handle the teaching/learning component.  Fundamentally, they don’t.  Learning is the responsibility of the applicant.  That learning is guided, to be sure, by both implied and explicit expectations, but the candidate is expected to seek out their own education, at their own expense, carried out at their own schedule.  There is absolute clarity, however, of the ultimate goals and no mystery about the eventual summative evaluation (answer the questions, read the eye chart, drive the car).

Screen Shot 2013-11-11 at 9.39.27 AMThus, the Ministry of Transportation has (whether intentionally or not) developed a masterful model of Competency Based Education that:

  • Is based on objectives that are clearly understood by learners and assessors alike.
  • Built on a knowledge base that is discrete, well-described and accessible by all.
  • Requires a set of personal attributes that are understood by all and accepted as relevant to mastery of the competency
  • Does not attempt to assess those attributes individually, but rather evaluates the overall competency in a blended, performance based method, the format (and content) of which is completely understood and open to everyone involved.
  • is truly Learner centred

But, you’ll note, there’s obviously a world of difference between driving a car and practicing Medicine.  Indeed there is.  However, the ability to assess and manage a patient presenting with a particular clinical presentation is, like driving a car, a competency set that requires a combination of knowledge, skills, personal attributes (a set of objectives), that must be learned and must be reliably evaluated.  What can we learn from our simple example that’s relevant to any attempt to develop a Competency Based Medical Education program?

  1. The learning objectives must be developed and expressed in meaningful, pragmatic terms.  Competency to do what?  What specific things should the “competent” learner be able to do?  In this regard, the emerging development of Entrustable Professional Activities will no doubt play a major role.
  2. The assessment should be performance-based and relate clearly and directly to those objectives.  There should be no mystery as to what will be expected, and the method of evaluation must be pre-defined and understood by all.
  3. Learning is primarily driven by the learner, not an inflexible curriculum, nor should it be based on any particular schedule.
  4. The responsibility of the program (or institution) should be to provide clarity regarding learning goals, an environment in which learning can occur, and support for the learning process.

Finally, I provide the reader with the best definition of CBE that I’ve encountered to date, which emerged from the previously mentioned article by Frank and colleagues.  It not only expresses these principles succinctly, but does so in a manner applicable to either driving a car or caring for a trauma patient, perhaps the best test of any definition attempting to capture such a complex combination of knowledge, skills and personal attributes.

 Screen Shot 2013-11-11 at 2.40.05 PM

Thanks to Theresa Suart (Educational Developer) and Lynel Jackson (master graphic designer) for their assistance in the development of this article. 

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Understanding Competency Based Education Lessons from an unlikely source

I was recently asked to speak at a conference on the topic of Competency Based Education.  My assignment was to provide definitions of that topic and to discuss the advantages and challenges associated with developing such an approach in an undergraduate medical program.

graph-nov12My search for a universally accepted definition of CBE began with a call to Theresa Suart, Educational Developer, who promptly alerted me to the reality that no such thing exists and, in fact, I had stumbled into an area of considerable controversy.  She directed me to helpful references, including a 2010 paper by Jason Frank and colleagues (Medical Teacher 32; 631-637) that is actually a systematic review of published definitions!  They reviewed a total of no fewer than 173 published definitions and, as illustrated in this table from their paper, the topic has been attracting increasing interest in recent years.  All this leads me to doubt the practical utility or relevance of a topic that so many bright people have difficulty even defining.  However, one becomes accustomed to such dilemmas when venturing into the world of medical education, and begins to view such uncertainties as opportunities to re-examine basic principles and search for patterns or examples of prior success that may be applicable.

Screen Shot 2013-11-11 at 2.36.58 PMThe principle I always find useful in assessing educational change is the fundamental triad of associations between Objectives, Learning and Assessment.  One of my first practical lessons in curricular design (and accreditation standards) is that these three components must be closely linked if any medical curriculum is to be effective.  Objectives must drive instruction and learning, and assessment must be linked to the teaching provided and the stated objectives.

 

With this in mind, I searched for a simple example that might help advance our understanding of Competency Based Education.  A conversation with one of my nieces who’d recently completed her Driver’s Education course provided that example.  The granting of a Driver’s License is, in fact, recognition of a competence for which there exists an easily understood and widely accepted global objective, specifically the ability to safely operate an automobile.  That global objective requires a body of knowledge, skills and personal CanDriveattributes which, with apologies to the Royal College and with tongue firmly in cheek, could be expressed as the CanDRIVE competency domains, which centre around a body of knowledge and understanding (the Driving Expert) but require additional attributes, such as (we might conjecture) Judgement, fundamental Literacy, physical Coordination, Social Accountability, Alertness (no cell phones) and Sobriety.  The knowledge component is completely and clearly articulated by the Ministry of Transportation in the Driver’s Manual, and the assessment of competencies is demonstrated in three parts, a written examination with questions taken directly from the manual, a cursory visual assessment involving recognition of traffic signs, and a performance based driving test during which the candidate must demonstrate the global objective (drive the car) while exhibiting the component competency domains (show up sober, pay attention, etc…).

And so, two parts of the educational triad are provided.  The true brilliance of the Ministry of Transportation however, is in how they handle the teaching/learning component.  Fundamentally, they don’t.  Learning is the responsibility of the applicant.  That learning is guided, to be sure, by both implied and explicit expectations, but the candidate is expected to seek out their own education, at their own expense, carried out at their own schedule.  There is absolute clarity, however, of the ultimate goals and no mystery about the eventual summative evaluation (answer the questions, read the eye chart, drive the car).

Screen Shot 2013-11-11 at 9.39.27 AMThus, the Ministry of Transportation has (whether intentionally or not) developed a masterful model of Competency Based Education that:

  • Is based on objectives that are clearly understood by learners and assessors alike.
  • Built on a knowledge base that is discrete, well-described and accessible by all.
  • Requires a set of personal attributes that are understood by all and accepted as relevant to mastery of the competency
  • Does not attempt to assess those attributes individually, but rather evaluates the overall competency in a blended, performance based method, the format (and content) of which is completely understood and open to everyone involved.
  • is truly Learner centred

But, you’ll note, there’s obviously a world of difference between driving a car and practicing Medicine.  Indeed there is.  However, the ability to assess and manage a patient presenting with a particular clinical presentation is, like driving a car, a competency set that requires a combination of knowledge, skills, personal attributes (a set of objectives), that must be learned and must be reliably evaluated.  What can we learn from our simple example that’s relevant to any attempt to develop a Competency Based Medical Education program?

  1. The learning objectives must be developed and expressed in meaningful, pragmatic terms.  Competency to do what?  What specific things should the “competent” learner be able to do?  In this regard, the emerging development of Entrustable Professional Activities will no doubt play a major role.
  2. The assessment should be performance-based and relate clearly and directly to those objectives.  There should be no mystery as to what will be expected, and the method of evaluation must be pre-defined and understood by all.
  3. Learning is primarily driven by the learner, not an inflexible curriculum, nor should it be based on any particular schedule.
  4. The responsibility of the program (or institution) should be to provide clarity regarding learning goals, an environment in which learning can occur, and support for the learning process.

Finally, I provide the reader with the best definition of CBE that I’ve encountered to date, which emerged from the previously mentioned article by Frank and colleagues.  It not only expresses these principles succinctly, but does so in a manner applicable to either driving a car or caring for a trauma patient, perhaps the best test of any definition attempting to capture such a complex combination of knowledge, skills and personal attributes.

 Screen Shot 2013-11-11 at 2.40.05 PM

Thanks to Theresa Suart (Educational Developer) and Lynel Jackson (master graphic designer) for their assistance in the development of this article. 

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Aesculapian Society Students Represent their Peers in Many Ways

A few days ago, the student representative for the First Patient Program wrote to ask if we would like him to touch base with his classmates before our next session with them. He even had the feedback survey questions designed! How helpful and proactive this is. And this made me think: our meds students and our Aesculapian Society are extremely supportive of and committed to our Undergraduate Medical Education Program.

In this article, I’d like to write a huge “Thank You” note to the students in our Queen’s Aesculapian Society!

The Aesculapian Society (AS) was first organized by the medical students of Queen’s University in 1872, and has remained a strong voice for Queen’s medical students ever since. All students registered in the School of Medicine become members of the Society, which includes as honourary members, all graduates in Medicine and members of the School of Medicine at Queen’s University.

The Society is dedicated to the promotion of the general interests of the School of Medicine and to the control of matters affecting medical students in their relationships to one another, to other student organizations at Queen’s and elsewhere, and to the School of Medicine, Senate, and other governing bodies of Queen’s University.

While the AS is active in working with its members in many ways, I wanted to talk about the work of AS student representatives on the Undergraduate Medical Education (UGME) Committees and in advising and acting on UGME programs.

Aesculapian Society student representatives sit on all of our UGME Committees (and there are over 11!) including Curriculum Committee, Admissions Committee and Student Assessment Committee. Many students sit on more than one committee providing a very thoughtful and important voice for students and voting on key issues. In some committees there are often 3 or more representatives, (one for each year of meds school), and in the case of the UGME Teaching and Learning Committee, currently 7 students are representatives, as there are 4 student monitors who track learning event types for our annual reports in addition to the three students representing preclerkship and clerkship.

Appointed student representatives for each class meet, often weekly, with Course Directors to give them feedback about the course, including Clinical and Communication Skills as well as all other courses. Our Technology representatives podcast classes, and also are there to spring to the aid of faculty when struggling with technology.

We also have student representatives for programs. For example, there is that representative for the First Patient Program who started this article, who will help us plan our final event of the program, and who is poised to give us feedback on the program as it is unfolding for the students. We have student Competency Reps, usually two for each competency/role, who work with the Competency Leads and plan events and strategies related to that competency, and funnel student feedback to the Leads.

In fact students are also involved in the accreditation process, including the self-study which is mandated by all schools, and also in tours and dialogues and discussions with accreditation visitors. Our students have impressed our accreditation visitors over the years!

Queen’s medical students run the Orientation Week for new students in the fall with the first year class council and Vice President coordinating it. Students are also heavily involved in the Admissions Weekends for the MD program. In first year, the students are ambassadors to the new students as well as making those great videos that have gone viral in many years. In second year, the students assist with the interview process and admissions process. Conservative estimates put 80% of the students involved in Admissions work.

The point of this is twofold: Queen’s Medical School has a tradition of listening to its students, even in the highest committees, and seeks their representation out actively. Not only do those leaders in the school listen, they take often act on the student concerns, suggestions and proposals.

But my main point today in writing is to laud the active participation, and willingness to serve that is a part of many many students enrolled in Queen’s Meds and serving on the AS. These students are giving precious time taken from study and sleep to give to their school. To me, they are already demonstrating the competencies of a good physician, in their collaboration, in their communication, in their advocacy, and in their management of time and energy. They are demonstrating their commitment to be part of solutions rather than problems, and they are demonstrating the importance of service. We are fortunate to have such a committed group to help us in our school. So Thank You! to the Aesculapian Society Executive and all its student members!

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Your new curriculum committee – would you like to nominate someone to join?

As of September 2013, the UGME Curriculum Committee is operating under new Terms of Reference, and, as a result, we are looking for new members.

Specifically, we have 5 “nominated” positions;  the Curriculum Committee’s decision was to seek nominations from the faculty at large for these positions, in addition to asking curricular leaders and curriculum committee members for nominations.  For more on these positions, see below.  To nominate, send to the Acting Chair, Dr. Michelle Gibson at gibson@queensu.ca.

These positions are:

  • Scientific Foundations Course Director (from our basic sciences courses)
  • Clinical Foundations Course Director (from our pre-clerkship clinical courses)
  • Clerkship Course Director (from any of the clerkship courses)
  • Competency Lead (From the Professional Foundations committee)
  • Discipline Lead (A discipline lead from any discipline)
  • Humanities Lead – Dr. Cheryl Cline has accepted this position.

The Curriculum Committee meets on the 2nd and 4th Thursdays of the month, from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m, from September to June, with monthly meetings in July and August.

The rest of the committee members are present as a direct result of a specific role they play in the curriculum.  There are vacancies here too, as the new terms of reference specify that no one person can represent two positions on the curriculum committee.  We are working to fill these vacancies. Currently, the membership includes:

  • Director, Curriculum – Vacant
  • Associate Dean, UME – Dr. Tony Sanfilippo*
  • Year 1 Director and Acting Chair – Dr. Michelle Gibson*
  • Year 2 Director – Dr. Lindsay Davidson*
  • Clinical Clerkship Director – Dr. Andrea Winthrop*
  • Clerkship Curricular Courses Director – Dr. Susan Moffatt
  • Clinical Skills Director – Dr. Cherie Hiscock-Jones
  • Chair, PF Committee – Vacant
  • Director, Student Assessment – Dr. Michelle Gibson*
  • Director, TLIC – Dr. Tony Sanfilippo*
  • Director, CFRC – Dr. Andrea Winthrop*
  • Manager, Educational Development and Faculty Support – Ms. Sheila Pinchin
  • Aesculapian Society representative – Elizabeth Clement (Meds 2016)

*Currently, in this transition period, all these individuals are representing two roles, and they are in the midst of seeking delegates for one of their roles.

Nominations will be accepted until October 29, 2013.  The process after that date is to discuss nominations with the individuals concerned.  MD-PEC will be appointing the nominated members in November.

Questions can be directed to the Acting Chair, Dr. Michelle Gibson at gibson@queensu.ca

 

 

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Curricular Council meets Oct. 29

The Curricular Council for Undergraduate Medical Education meets Oct. 29 at the University Club, from 4:30-6:00. RSVP notes have been sent out to Curricular Leaders. Topics for discussion will include the new governance structure for UGME, an update on accreditation, best methods of communicating with all faculty, new electronic exam format, and upcoming professional development opportunities. Slides from the Curricular Council will be posted for all on the Faculty Resources website in MEdTech: https://meds.queensu.ca/central/community/facultyresources

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Not your Father’s (or Mother’s) Clinical Clerkship

Meds 2015 students get their white coats and begin the contemporary Clinical Clerkship 

This week, the students of Meds 2015 begin the phase of medical education still referred to as the Clinical Clerkship.  Last Friday afternoon, family and friends joined them to celebrate the White Coat Ceremony, a longstanding tradition that marks this important transition.  It was a pleasure to meet many family members, some of whom were physicians who remarked on the changes between their own educational experiences and those of their offspring.

white-coats

The need to provide supervised learning within the clinical setting has always been regarded as essential to the development of future physicians.  Indeed, early versions of medical education consisted entirely of what could only be termed apprenticeships under the direction of a fully qualified physician who was engaged by the student as their tutor, mentor and assessor.  It was largely as a result of Abraham Flexner’s (pictured) transformational 1911 review of medical education in North America that medical schools were required to provide formal instruction in the basic and medical sciences.  However, Flexner continued to emphasize the critical role of education within the context of clinical service.  flexnerThe role of medical students within service delivery, largely in hospital settings, became consolidated into the discrete role that came to be known as the Clinical Clerkship.  Being a “Clerk” was to have a job or role within the hospital’s complex service delivery.  The role consisted of “clerking” patients (carrying out admission histories and physicals), following the progress of patients through their hospital stay, arranging and following up on investigations, and coordinating discharge and post hospitalization follow-up.  In addition, Clerks had unofficial but widely accepted service delivery roles of their own within hospitals, including phlebotomy, administering intravenous medications, performing simple procedures such as Foley catheter insertion and cast removal, simple suturing and recording electrocardiograms.  Appropriately supervised and monitored, this role provided opportunities to engage patient care in all its complexity in a transitional fashion, leading eventually to the ability to engage patient care independently after graduation.  The service delivery component of the clerkship was eventually recognized as such with the provision of a modest stipend, which continues today.  Interestingly, the role of the Clerk varied very little between services, specialties and differing patient populations, the goal being to develop strong foundational skills in patient assessment and management, which were felt to be consistent and “learnable” within any patient care context.

As the “service” component of the clerkship grew and hospital care became more procedurally driven, understandable concerns were raised regarding the balance between service delivery and education.  Medical educators, buttressed by increasingly specific and prescriptive accreditation standards, developed standards and objectives for the medical student role, coupled with a need for more structured and objective assessment.  At the same time, our students were developing an increasing need to use clerkship experiences to explore career options in an increasingly complex and competitive postgraduate training environment.

Today’s clinical clerkship has evolved considerably from the model experienced by most mid or late career practitioners.  Now usually consisting of the final 2 years of medical school, it is intended to provide clinical exposures that vary not only in focus but also in setting, recognizing the reality that our students have a critical need to explore career options and to encounter patients in a variety of settings that will reflect their own career paths.  The rotations are enhanced with formal educational experiences, formalized feedback on all curricular objectives, and structured assessments of various types.  To illustrate the modern clerkship, the following example profile is provided to illustrate the journey of one medical student through a clerkship:

  • A six week General Surgery rotation on an in-hospital unit at either Kingston General Hospital or our affiliated teaching hospital in Oshawa.
  • A six week Peri-operative Medicine rotation rotating through a series of experiences with surgical subspecialties (such as Plastics, Orthopedics, Urology), Anaesthesia and Emergency Medicine.
  • Six weeks on Core Internal Medicine spent as part of the care team assigned to a Clinical Teaching Unit in Kingston, Oshawa or Peterborough.
  • A further six weeks on Specialty Medicine spent undertaking consultation or out-patient clinics within three medical sub-specialties.
  • Six weeks of Psychiatry in Kingston, Oshawa or Markham, generally office or consultation- based.
  • Six weeks of Family Medicine working with a community family physician or Family Health Team.
  • Six weeks of Pediatrics, provided in either a hospital ward or community practice.
  • Six weeks of Obstetrics and Gynecology, consisting of shifts in Labour and Delivery, gynecology ward, or outpatient clinics.
  • Sixteen weeks of electives, during which the students a series of 2 week experiences in specialty services and locations across Canada designed to broaden their clinical experience and exposure to career options.
  • Three 4 week “Core Curriculum” rotations placed at the beginning, within and at the end of the clinical rotations, intended to provide common instruction and assessment in advanced topics and practice related instruction.

All these rotations feature, in addition to the clinical experiences, structured teaching, all guided by objectives linked to the overall Curricular Goals and Competency Based Objectives document which was developed and is regularly reviewed by our Clerkship Committee and approved by the Curriculum Committee. 

In addition, students can elect to undertake our Integrated Community Clerkship, consisting of an 18 week placement within a smaller community working with community tutors and Family Health Teams, intended to provide longitudinal experiences in Family Medicine, Pediatrics and Psychiatry.

Students can also apply for an increasing number of International exchanges which allow them to undertake a core rotation at universities in another country.

All rotations feature content relevant to the various Professional Competencies (Professionalism, Advocacy, Collaboration, Management) and their achievement in these domains is a component of rotation assessments.

All students continually log their clinical experiences and technical procedures in order to ensure all learning objectives are being met.  They also undertake comprehensive structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) in order to ensure core clinical skills are mastered and maintained.

So…a far cry from the service dominated Clinical Clerkship so familiar to most practicing physicians.  A key, and very reasonable question could be posed: Does it matter?  Are our students better prepared for the demands and rigours of residency and practice than their predecessors?  This intriguing question will be the subject of my next Blog.

 

 

 

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Upcoming dates for Undergraduate Medicine at Queen’s

Curricular Council: Dr. Sanfilippo is calling meetings of the Curricular Council on the following dates at 4:30 p.m.
Oct. 2, Jan. 22 and May 14.

Professional Development Days for Curricular Leaders: There will be a full day Professional Development retreat for Curricular Leaders on Friday Nov. 22 and Friday, June 13.

Stay tuned for more details, sent via email.

Writing for Health Care Providers Workshop: Carrying on the theme of narratives in medicine, so ably begun by Dr. Lam at the HG Kelly address, please note that Dr. Hilton Koppe is presenting a writer’s workshop “Beyond the Medical Record: Creative writing as burnout prevention for health professionals” on Oct. 16, 1:30-5:00 at the Bracken Library. Please see attached folder for more details.
Please contact The Office of Faculty Development at fac.dev@queensu.ca to sign up.

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Upcoming dates for Undergraduate Medicine at Queen’s

Curricular Council: Dr. Sanfilippo is calling meetings of the Curricular Council on the following dates at 4:30 p.m.
Oct. 2, Jan. 22 and May 14.

Professional Development Days for Curricular Leaders: There will be a full day Professional Development retreat for Curricular Leaders on Friday Nov. 22 and Friday, June 13.

Stay tuned for more details, sent via email.

Writing for Health Care Providers Workshop: Carrying on the theme of narratives in medicine, so ably begun by Dr. Lam at the HG Kelly address, please note that Dr. Hilton Koppe is presenting a writer’s workshop “Beyond the Medical Record: Creative writing as burnout prevention for health professionals” on Oct. 16, 1:30-5:00 at the Bracken Library. Please see attached folder for more details.
Please contact The Office of Faculty Development at fac.dev@queensu.ca to sign up.

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