Failure to Thrive in Medical School Syndrome: Signs, Symptoms and Diagnostic Approach

“Failure to Thrive” is a term well-established in the world of clinical medicine. In the pediatric context, it refers to a child who is failing to achieve anticipated developmental milestones. In the adult world, it’s more informally used to describe someone who is simply not doing well in their current circumstances, be it in hospital or in their community setting. Examples would be an elderly patient at home who is slowly declining and losing ability for independent living, or a hospital in-patient who is not improving despite what seems to be appropriate treatment.

The concept, I’ve come to appreciate, can also be usefully applied in the context of medical education. Failure to Thrive in Medical School Syndrome (FTMSS), can be engaged as we would any clinical condition, with characteristic signs and symptoms.

There are six key cardinal signs or manifestations of FTMSS. These include:

  1. Poor academic performance.
  2. Absenteeism, or habitual lateness for scheduled events.
  3. Habitual failure to meet established deadlines for submission of academic reports or administrative requirements.
  4. Inter-personal conflicts with peers, administrative staff or faculty.
  5. Poor or unprofessional behaviour in the academic or clinical setting.
  6. Lack of attention to surroundings, or personal appearance.

Symptoms of the FTMSS sufferer might include lethargy, fragile confidence, diminished sense of self-worth, agitation, defensiveness, anxiety.

As with the approach to any medical syndrome, the objective is not simply to make a diagnosis, but to establish the underlying cause. Understanding the mechanism by which this syndrome develops is essential to helping the sufferer deal with the affliction, establishing appropriate treatment, and hopefully starting down the road to cure.

All the manifestations of FTMSS have the common feature of not being attributable to any intrinsic limitation on the part of the afflicted individual. Having come through the intensely competitive medical school admission process, it seems reasonable to assume that every medical student is fundamentally capable of performing academically, being on time, meeting deadlines, relating reasonably well to others, attending to their personal appearance and behaving professionally. Failure to do any of these things can therefore can reasonably be attributed to some external cause.

And so, what are the root causes of FTTMS? At this point, a disclaimer seems appropriate. In the absence of any tested and proven pathophysiological mechanism for the condition, I provide postulates based on many years of observation of afflicted individuals, perhaps as a basis for clinical management and hypotheses for future clinical trials. That being said, and in no particular order, here goes:

  1. Failure to adjust to medical education. The medical school curriculum, learning methods and, importantly, the use of assessment in medical school can vary considerably from many other undergraduate programs. Fundamentally, the goals of education are no longer strictly about the aspirations of the learner, but rather geared to preparation to meet the needs of future patients. This change in focus can be somewhat unsettling for some. Moreover, the curriculum can be intense and demanding. Educational methods include much small-group and collaborative activities, as well as required independent learning. Assessments can be frequent and geared not towards short term retention and determining comparisons with other learners, but in assessing individual achievement with respect to learning objectives. In medical school, students therefore find themselves confronted with a learning environment very different than that which they’ve experienced previously. They are also asked to established individual rather than comparative goals of achievement. All this adjustment can be difficult for the student who is accustomed to learning situations which are individual, easily self-controlled and targeted to parameters of external validation.
  2. Lack of motivation for a career in Medicine. For many students, the decision to engage the medical school application process begins at a very early age. The process can be all-consuming and require the applicant to forgo many opportunities and experiences usually undertaken in childhood and adolescence in order to undertake educational programs and volunteer activities that they, and perhaps their parents, feel relevant to their application. The decision to pursue a career in medicine can therefore prevent a young person from engaging valuable developmental experiences or from considering other interests and potential career options. Others may enter medical school with an incomplete understanding of a medical career. As they understand more clearly what doctors actually do and what is expected of them, they may begin to realize the career is not for them. Medical education and, more importantly, a career in medicine, are both rewarding and demanding. Both require deep commitment.
  3. Unresolved personal issues. Medical students, like all young people, experience a variety of personal stresses and adversities. There can be a reluctance to recognize or to admit to the full impact of such stresses and to seek help. There can be a concern that admitting that one is feeling challenged or overcome by such circumstances might be seen as signs of internal weakness or unsuitability for their chosen career. There can also be a tendency to defer feelings of loss, disappointment or grief. Over time such unresolved stresses can mount and express themselves in negative ways which may lead to the various manifestations of FTTMS.
  4. Medical students can become ill or simply run down. Many medical conditions can be gradual, subtle and insidious. Accumulated fatigue due to lack of attention to simple things like regular sleep habits, nutrition and fitness can gradually mount and imperceptibly affect performance. Not unlike practising physicians, medical students can have a remarkable ability to ignore features of illness and fatigue in themselves which they would very quickly recognize in others.
  5. Mental illness. Medical students, like all young people, could suffer from chronic mental illness or develop such conditions after entering medical school. These can be very difficult to recognize in oneself and there may be stigma associated with such conditions that inhibit affected individuals from recognizing their full significance or in seeking help.

The objective of any faculty advisor or mentor engaging the FTMSS sufferer, of course, is to help the afflicted student understand the problem and therefore engage effective therapies. The clinical approach for students exhibiting signs of FTTMS, ultimately, is not unlike that for other conditions that have behavioural manifestations. It begins with understanding and acceptance that the troublesome behaviour likely has an underlying precipitant that can be defined and therefore managed.

Diagnosis requires a thorough history focused on the potential causes listed above, and features that may help identify the underlying, culprit problem. Having identified a potential underlying mechanism, counseling is required to help the students themselves understand cause and effects. Together, management can be engaged.

What happens when none of the potential mechanisms seems to fit, and we come up with an idiopathic etiology? In my experience, this is very rare, but obviously troubling. Are we simply dealing with a poor “fit” for medicine? In such cases, we should provide compassionate support and oversight – what some clinical colleagues would term “watchful waiting”. Clarity usually emerges with time and, with it, the optimal approach becomes obvious to all.

And so, the process for assessing a medical education problem bears remarkable similarity to the process we teach and use for any clinical problem. Once again, there’s a striking parallel between patient care and medical education. Doctors instinctively engage their students as they do their patients. Without judgement, but rather thoughtful contemplation of how observed manifestations reveal underlying mechanistic causes, leading to understanding and, with it, effective intervention.

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Med Students’ activities extend beyond the classroom

It’s that time of the new year when the winter doldrums can set it – weather and routine can weigh everyone down. Along with that, there’s that old cliché about “all work and no play”. There’s little risk of our medical students being thought of as anything approaching dull and they provide great ideas for how to beat the winter blahs. In addition to their full class and study load, they make time for a wide variety of extra-curricular activities for fun, recreation and community involvement.

Aesculapian Society President Rae Woodhouse recently shared some highlights of these endeavours:

In early January, 68 pre-clerks attended the annual MedGames in Montreal and placed 2nd of everyone outside of Quebec. Sponsored by the Canadian Federation of Medical Students (CFMS), MedGames brings together medical students from across the country for a friendly sports competition and network building.

Thirty-one second year students competed in BEWICS.  This is the annual Queen’s Intramural sports competition which features a variety of self-proclaimed “quirky” sports such as water volleyball and rugby basketball. The QMed team placed third overall for competitiveness and spirit.

The Class of 2021 Class Project Committee hosted Queens’ first ever Scholars At Risk Talk (see more on this here).

Pre-clerk students recently competed in the Ottawa’s Winterlude Ice Dragon Boat competition and about 30 went on the annual ski trip to Mont-Tremblant two weekends ago.

And if ice dragon boating and skiing weren’t enough of a challenge, about 45 students from across the four years spent a couple of hours recently learning the basics of curling from a fourth year student. This is the fourth time for this event!

For Wellness month, the Wellness committee put together a month of activities with each week having a theme: social, physical, mental and nutritional wellness. During physical wellness week, 40 pre-clerks did a Crossfit class and 20 did a spin class taught by the AS Wellness Officer.

The 2nd annual Jacalyn Duffin Health and Humanities conference happened recently and was very well received.

This past weekend, 20 students went to NYC to learn about the history of medicine, led by Dr. Jenna Healey (Hannah History of Medicine Chair) and the What Happened In Medicine Historical Society. 

And, over 100 mentorship group members attend trivia at the Grad Club. (Take note of that, it could be a future trivia question!)

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Singing the praises of learning objectives

This past Sunday afternoon, I had the pleasure of attending the Kingston Symphony’s matinee performance of Gene Kelly: A Life in Music at the Grand Theatre.  The show featured clips from Kelly’s most memorable performances, with live musical accompaniment by the symphony, under the direction of Evan Mitchell.

Throughout the show, Kelly’s wife and biographer, Patricia Ward Kelly, shared anecdotes and Kelly’s own insights into his choreography and performances.

She talked about the work he put into creating dances, painstakingly writing out the choreography plan, before working with his fellow performers to perfect the dances themselves. “He didn’t just show up and wiggle around on the stage,” she said.

My educational developer lens instantly compared this to the framework provided by well-written learning objectives. Objectives focus teaching and learning plans, and contribute to authentic assessment.

Yes, this is another blog about learning objectives.

In the abstract, learning objectives seem like just another box on a checklist or hoop to jump through.  Used the way intended, however, they are signposts that guide learning and teaching plans effectively—whether for a class or a single person—the same way Kelly’s planning delivered award-winning and inspiring choreography.

Yes, there’s a “gold standard” for writing objectives (that I’ve written about previously here). And there are verbs to use—and ones to avoid—and if it doesn’t come naturally to you to think this way, it can be pretty tedious.

What it’s really about is planning: knowing what you’re setting out to do. If you have an objective—a goal—then you can make your plan and communicate it to others effectively.

Well-crafted objectives also make things great for assessment, because it’s very clear what you have to measure at the end of the lesson, course, or program.

If you say, “I’m going to get better at taking patient histories” – what does that mean? What does “better” look like? If it means, “I’m going to note down details, or I’m going to ask specific questions, or I’m going to listen more than I have been, or interrupt less… then you know what you need to work on. You know what the focus needs to be, whether you’re a learner or a teacher.

Eventually, you’ll be able to do a history without thinking things through so deliberately – once you’ve achieved fluidity in that skill.  But before it’s a habit, you need to plan, your checklist, and I’m hitting all the boxes? Not just: “be better”.

For example, one of my plans in 2018 was to read more books that weren’t medical education and weren’t related to my PhD coursework. “Read more for fun.” That was it. My objective was pretty vague and, as a result, I didn’t create a workable plan. “Read more” didn’t get me very far. I read parts of eight non-work-related and non-course-related books. And three of those were cookbooks.

I set a more specific objective for 2019 that I would read more by spending five minutes every morning before I left for work reading something from my “recreational” “to be read” book stack (mountain).

I’ve finished two books, which is already a 200% improvement over last year. That specificity can make a difference.

And that’s really all objectives are: an outcome statement to focus your plan.

And that’s why we focus highlight objectives in our competency framework. It’s why we map things to them—learning events, assessments, EPAs—so we can be consistent and everybody knows what the plan is.

How much detail do you need in your objectives? This depends on how granularly you need to communicate your goals in order to be effective.

For his iconic Singin’ in the Rain, Gene Kelly had to map out the location of each of the puddles. His plan needed to be that detailed to get it right.

If you’re wrestling with learning objectives and how these relate to your teaching, give me a call.

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Scholars at Risk speaker

By Danielle Weber-Adrian (Meds 2021)

It’s easy to start medical school with a fixed idea of what it means to be a physician. For many, we visualize the patient-physician interaction as a series of investigations, treatments and confidences on the individual’s journey towards health. Although there is truth in this, the reality is that medicine represents so much more within the greater community. Being a physician, as many come to realize during medical school, means becoming an ally to those who are marginalized, and an advocate for the change we wish to see in our global and local macrocosm. So, it seems fitting that the Queen’s Medicine Class of 2021 project as of last year has been to promote the Scholars at Risk program at Queen’s with the help of the International Office.

Dr. Evren Altinkas

Scholars at Risk is an organization which provides assistance to over 300 vulnerable scholars per year. These include physicians, journalists, lawyers and professors who have been targeted and threatened by their national governments because of their advocacy work or research. The scholars are matched with universities around the world where they receive temporary teaching and research positions. This provides the scholar with sanctuary and immediate stability, while benefiting the host institution by granting access to a world leader in their field. By joining the Scholars at Risk consortium Queen’s University is prioritizing academic freedom and human rights on a global scale.

As a new member of the Scholars at Risk organization, Queen’s University and the School of Medicine is hosting our first guest lectureship by Dr. Evren Altinkas. Dr. Altinkas is a Turkish historian and scholar at risk who is currently working at the University of Guelph. He studies the historical limitations of academic freedom as experienced by minorities in Europe and the Middle East. His lecture is open to the public and will take place on Friday, February 1st at 12:30 to 1:30 in the upper auditorium (room 132A) of the New Medical Building (15 Arch Street, Kingston, ON). Attendees are invited to join him later that evening for dinner and conversation. The dinner will be hosted at a local restaurant in Kingston; however, guests will be asked to cover the cost of their own meals.  To sign up please see the following form: https://goo.gl/forms/vdkzjy3AHCyCQK252

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Indigenous Health Care focus of February FHS events with Dr. Barry Lavallee

 

Dear Colleagues,

My name is Terry Soleas, I’m an Education Consultant with the Office of Professional Development and a PhD Candidate in Education. I have the privilege to work in your Faculty of Health Sciences.

In a collaboration between the Indigenous Health Education Working Group, Faculty of Health Sciences Decanal Leadership, and the Office of Professional Development and Educational Scholarship, we are pleased to present three days of extraordinary reconciliation in healthcare events. Our keynote speaker at all three events is Dr. Barry Lavallee of the University of Manitoba who is our guest for the three action-packed days on campus. Dr. Lavallee has proven to be a dynamite speaker who speaks plainly, practically, and passionately on issues of social justice in medicine, with a particular focus on rural and northern indigenous communities.

The three interactive events are:

1) Public Reception and Lecture

2) Faculty Development Half-Day

3) Education Round

These are remarkable and free events that go a long way in Queen’s ongoing Reconciliation efforts. I hope you will join us at many of these events and help us make our future at Queen’s and beyond better, kinder, and brighter!

I’d be delighted to answer any questions you might have😊

With grateful thanks,

Eleftherios K. Soleas, OCT
Educational Consultant
Professional Development & Educational Scholarship
Faculty of Health Sciences, Queen’s University
613-533-6000 x 79035

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20th Annual Travill Debate set for November 7

The 20th annual A.A. Travill Debate is set for November 7 in the Ellis Hall Auditorium, 58 University Avenue, beginning at 5:45 p.m.

This year’s topic is:

Be it resolved that… Publicly funded hospitals should not be able to have religious affiliation

On the “Yea” side, arguing for the proposition will be Dr. Andrea Winthrop and Meds 2022 student Nathan Katz while Dr. Michael Fitzpatrick and Meds 2021 student Sara Brade will argue the “Nay” side.

As described on the Travill Debate website, the debate will “run on a polite and rigorously timed schedule” which features:

  • 10 minutes for each member of the team, alternating back and forth – Yea and Nay – until all four participants have laid out their arguments.
  • Then two minutes for summary from one member of each side.
  • The Travill Debate Gavel is banged very loudly when the time limits are reached.
  • No Power Point or technological aids.
  • Humour is welcome. Formal attire and costumes have also been used to good effect.

This annual debate – featuring a controversial topic in medicine – was created in memory of A.A. “Tony” Travill. As described on the debate’s web page:

Dr. Travill came to Canada in 1957 after serving as aircrew in the RAF (WWII) and reading Medicine at the London Hospital Medical School. He did a residency year in Montreal and practised in Orillia with Dr. Philip Rynard (Queen’s ’26) before coming to Queen’s to study Anatomy under Dr. John Basmajian. After two years at Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska, Dr. Travill returned to Queen’s in the Department of Anatomy in 1964, becoming Professor and Head from 1969-1978. His research interests were in embryology, teratology and education. Dr. Travill was a strict parliamentarian and noted Faculty Historian (Medicine at Queen’s; 1854-1920, the Hannah Institute for the History of Medicine, 1988: Just a Few: Queen’s Medical Profiles, 1991). He served the community as a Trustee of the Separate School Board and in 1964 was a founding member of the John Austin Society, the still thriving local history of medicine club. In particular, Dr. Travill had a passion for debate on current social, political and educational issues, and for many years he delivered a rigorous and challenging lecture to incoming first year medical students during orientation week.

As further noted by Dr. Jaclyn Duffin, then-Hannah Chair for the History of Medicine, in the original proposal for the memorial debate:

“As his friends and colleagues know, A.A. ‘Tony’ Travill was intelligent, quick, witty, a great teacher, who loved to talk—preferably to argue. Proud of his credentials in clinical medicine and his origins in practice, he rose to head a basic science department (Anatomy). He was an erudite historian, with distinguished publications… Travill also had a deep interest in Philosophy, especially logic, ethics, and epistemology. He loved to cast doubt, to stir up trouble, but he didn’t really mind losing.”

Please join us! All are welcome!

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History of Medicine Week: 100 years later… Looking Back on the First World War and the Spanish Influenza October 22-26th

By Kelly Salman (Meds 2021)

The What Happened in Medicine (WHIM) Historical Society is proud to host the fourth annual History of Medicine Week! This year’s theme highlights a significant anniversary for both medicine and the world. A century ago in 1918, two major and interconnected events in history occurred: the Spanish flu and WWI. Learn more about what happened in medicine then and consider how things have (or haven’t) changed in our present day 2018 — 100 years later…

Students, Faculty, and Community members are all welcome to attend.

Museum of Health Care Showcase

Monday October 22nd, 8:30am-3:30pm

New Medical Building Grande Corridor, 15 Arch St.

Many of our greatest medical technologies and advancements have come out of times of crisis. Come and peruse a sampling of century-old artifacts from both the Spanish Flu and WWI. Curated by the Museum of Healthcare.


Speaker Panel Followed by Wine and Cheese Reception

Tuesday October 23rd, 5:30-8:00pm

Speaker panel: New Medical Building, Rm 132 A, 5:30-7:00pm

Reception: Museum of Healthcare, 7:00-8:00pm

 

“We Forgot to Remember – young Canadians commemorating the stories of the 1918 Pandemic”

Award-winning Neil Orford will discuss the Spanish Flu and its impact in medicine.

 

“Brock Chisholm and the Legacy of War Trauma”

Military historians Dr. Robert Engen and Matthew Barrett will discuss the trauma of war through their research on the experiences of Lt. Brock Chisholm in the first world war before he became a physician and the first director general of the WHO. Dr. Engen and Mr. Barrett created a graphic novel to illustrate this narrative, as featured in the Queen’s Alumni Review this summer: https://www.queensu.ca/gazette/alumnireview/stories/battle-hill-70

 About the Speakers:

In 2017, Neil Orford retired from teaching History at Centre Dufferin District High School in Shelburne, ON. His work as a teacher has seen him win numerous awards for his teaching, most recently the 2015 Government of Canada History Award for Teaching; as well as the prestigious 2013 Canadian Governor General’s Award for History Teaching and the 2012 Ontario Premier’s Award for Teaching Excellence. In July 2013, Neil Orford founded a consulting business, Canadian Historical Educational Services, Ltd. to assist school boards, museums, non-profits & government agencies with designing educational programs for historical thinking and commemoration. This work has led him to consultation work with the Federal Ministry of Canadian Heritage in 2017, helping to design digital commemorations for students across Canada.

Dr. Robert Engen, MA’08, PhD’14 (History) is an assistant professor of history at Royal Military College and an adjunct professor in the Department of History at Queen’s. He is the author of Canadians Under Fire: Infantry Effectiveness in the Second World War and Strangers in Arms: Combat Motivation in the Canadian Army, 1943–1945, both published by McGill-Queen’s University Press.

Matthew Barrett is an SSHRC-funded PhD candidate in the Department of History at Queen’s. His doctoral research examines the concepts of honour and dishonour within military culture. In particular, he studies the dismissal and cashiering of Canadian officers during both World Wars. Additional research focuses on Canadian public and institutional attitudes toward suicide in the military. His academic work has appeared in Canadian Military Journal, Canadian Military History, Journal of Canadian Studies and British Journal of Canadian Studies. He has also illustrated two First World War graphic novels with Robert Engen.


Trivia Night

Friday October 26th, 7:00-9:00pm

The Grad Club, 162 Barrie St.

 Impress your friends with your history know-how during a historically themed Trivia Night! Snacks will be provided!

 

 

 

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Poetry, journalism, and a Pepsi commercial… or, a meandering parable about balance

I started writing poetry again recently. I do this, then abandon it, then reclaim it at various intervals. I’m always better with it.

This may seem to have very little – if anything – to do with medical education. And, you’re right in one sense. Join me on a little self-indulgent meandering to get to my point.

As I write this, it’s Thanksgiving Day – a day when people traditionally reflect on their blessings and things they’re grateful for. And, I’m on the cusp of a milestone birthday, so perhaps that has made me more introspective than other weeks, when I write about course evaluations and how we value them (we do!), or team-based learning and how it contributes to long-term learning and understanding more than straight lectures (it does!), or ways service-learning contributes to both social accountability and professional development (yes!). So, I find myself thinking about poetry.

On the road to becoming any professional – and medicine is no exception – we ask people to shed a lot of things along the way.

We ask people to shed attitudes that aren’t aligned with their goals. To ditch beliefs that aren’t compatible with where they’re going. To replace erroneous information or practices with those that are proven to be more valid.

The profession of medicine itself demands other things – things I watch colleagues work through and cope with – long days, longer nights, emotional and physical demands they may never have imagined at the start of their careers.

Because, really, none of us truly ever know what we’re getting into.

All of this coalesces in a kaleidoscope of who we were and who we are and who we will be. The parts and colours shifting as the years turn.

My first career was in journalism. In the spring of Grade 12, I was accepted into the four-year Bachelor of Journalism program at the University of King’s College. They only accepted 35 students a year, out of nearly 1,000 applicants, so this was exciting! As parents are wont to do, my father, an English teacher, mentioned my acceptance to a colleague he saw at a conference. That colleague was the late Don Murray, then a professor of Journalism at the University of New Hampshire. Professor Murray later sent me a number of articles and a book on journalism (that I still have and use to this day), but he passed along advice through my father that was even more valuable.

“They’re going to teach her how to write a certain way,” he said. “And that’s important, and she needs to do that. But tell her not to give up her other stuff. She needs to keep doing that, too. It will make her a better writer.”

I haven’t always adhered to that advice, but over 32 years after first hearing it, I know its value. So I put pencil to paper to work out ideas, and thoughts, and metaphors. But, really, I’m claiming a part of myself I refuse to shed. It’s something I need to keep to be me. To be better.

Are there things you’ve accidentally shed along the way that you didn’t need to? Are there parts of you you’d like to reclaim, to give you that edge, that solace, that space to be you, preserved in the full person you want to be?

As I write this, I’m reminded of the 2004 diet Pepsi “old van” commercial… where a thirty-something dad is asked if there’s anything else youthful he’d like to experience and he says his old van. He then imagines his 1980s-era rocker painted van and what driving that in his current life (like dropping his kids off at school) would be like (not good!). Then he drinks his can of pop and is happy with that.

Some things can’t – and likely shouldn’t – be reclaimed. But if there’s something like poetry, or running, or music, or nosing around in antique shops, or reading trashy fiction (however you define that), or some other seemed-not-that-important-at-the-time thing that you miss about being you, consider ways to recapture that. And fit that “old” part amongst the newer parts.

Just maybe not that van.

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Fourth Annual Pap Party event set for October 15-18

By Lauren Wilson (MEDS 2019, Katherine Rabicki (MEDS 2019), Ariba Shah (MEDS 2020) and Hayley Manlove (MEDS 2021)

The fourth annual Pap Party event will take place October 15-18th, during Cervical Cancer Awareness week. This is an event which runs free pap smear clinics, specifically intending to reach women who may not have access to cervical cancer screening otherwise and to increase awareness of Human Papilloma Virus in the community.

In 2015, Cancer Care Ontario estimated that 26% of screen eligible women were overdue for their pap smear. Ensuring adequate access to all women and minimizing barriers to receiving screening are crucial; a Pap Party priority. In 2017, across all four clinic dates, 30 women received pap smears through the Pap Party campaign.

Women aged 21-70 who have not had a pap smear in the last three years are welcome. To increase accessibility to cervical cancer screening, women without primary care physicians, with or without a valid health card are also encouraged to attend the Pap Party Event.

The clinics are run by a team of medical students, residents and physicians under the guidance of Dr. Julie Francis and Dr. Hugh Langley and in collaboration with the Federation of Medical Women of Canada (FMWC). The first Pap Party in 2015 took place in Kingston and has since grown to offer clinics in Belleville, Napanee, and Tyendinaga as well.

The 2018 Pap Party schedule is :

Monday October 15 5:30pm – 7:30pm: HPE Public Health, Belleville

Tuesday October 16 5:30pm – 7:30pm: Community Well Being Centre, Tyendinaga, Mohawk Territory

Wednesday October 17 5:30pm – 7:30pm: Kingston Health Science Centre, Burr 1, Kingston

Thursday October 18 5:30pm – 7:30pm: Kingston Community Health Center, Napanee

To expand Pap Party further and combat declining cervical cancer screening rates, we have also reached out to all primary care clinics in the Kingston area encouraging them to host their own pap smear clinics during Cervical Cancer Awareness Week. They will also be encouraged to offer the HPV Vaccine. Clinics that register with the FMWC receive a kit that includes a tip sheet, colour poster, news release template, and patient education brochures. To register your clinic and contribute to reducing cervical cancer rates, please visit https://fmwc.ca/events/pap-campaign/.

The FMWC website also has more information for individuals and will help them find a registered clinic nearby.

Thank you taking the time to learn about the Pap Party initiative. Please feel free to contact us if you would like any additional information and please spread information about the Pap Party event to women in your life! We would be grateful and thrilled!

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Medical Student Research Showcase September 20

By Drs. Heather Murray & Melanie Walker

This year the School of Medicine is proud to invite you to the 7th annual Medical Student Research Showcase on Thursday September 20, 2018.

This event celebrates the research achievements of our undergraduate medical students, with both posters and an oral plenary session featuring research performed by students while they have been enrolled in medical school. All students who received summer studentship research funding through the School of Medicine in 2018 will be presenting their work, as well as many other research initiatives. The posters will be displayed in the David Walker Atrium of the School of Medicine building from 8 am until 5 pm, with the students standing at their posters answering questions between 10:30 and noon.

The oral plenary features the top research projects selected by a panel of faculty judges, and will run in room 132A from noon until 1:30 pm on September 20, immediately following the poster session Q&A.

This year’s faculty judges included:

Dr. Stephen Pang

Dr. Sheela Abraham

Dr. Nishardi Wijeratne

Dr. Faiza khurshid

Dr. Graeme Smith

Dr. Olga Bougie

Dr. Susan Crocker

Dr. Michael Rauh

Dr. Prameet Sheth

Dr. Yuka Asai

Dr. Thiwanka Wijeratne

Dr. Jennifer Flemming

Dr. Anne Ellis

Dr. Tim Phillips

We are very grateful to these faculty members for evaluating our oral plenary applicants this year.

The three students who have been selected for the oral plenary session, and the titles of their research presentations and faculty supervisor names are listed below. Each of these three students will receive The Albert Clark Award for Medical Student Research Excellence.

Harry Chandrakumaran – Inter-Laboratory Variability Of Parathyroid Hormone: impact on clinical decision-making
Sachin Pasricha – Clinical indications associated with opioid initiation for pain management in Ontario, Canada: A population-based cohort study
Rachel Oh – Evaluation of ARHGAP33 missense alleles in a zebrafish model of childhood glaucoma

Please set aside some time to attend the Medical Student Research Showcase on September 20th. The students will appreciate your interest and support, and you will be amazed at what they have been able to achieve.

 

 

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