Why a picture is worth more than 1000 words

Whether it’s the dreaded Service Ontario snap-shot that haunts us on our driver’s licence, or the passport photo that looks like we’ve been through a car wash, many of us despise the photo requirements public life tosses at us.

To these government-issued ID requirements, add the MEdTech Profile picture request. Please. Because we really need everyone to upload pictures to their profiles.

There are a lot of different reasons people don’t want to post a picture to their MEdTech profile – not the least of which is sometimes a nice picture of ourselves is hard to come by (mainly because we’re too hard on ourselves and, trust me, as someone who hasn’t lost the “baby weight” and the baby in question is 11 years old, I get the vanity argument.)

Why bother? There are two key reasons we need these photos: for proper faculty and preceptor identification during course evaluations; and to avoid email directory confusion.

  1. Course evaluation: Getting accurate feedback

Every faculty member who teaches four or more hours is evaluated by our students as part of our ongoing course and faculty review processes. This ensures appropriate feedback and contributes to overall quality of educational experiences as well as meets accreditation standards. Additionally, evaluation of clerkship preceptors is expanding to include multiple short-term supervisors. The challenge for our students is that by the end of a semester or rotation, they have dozens of faculty members they have had limited contact with and they’re faced with a list of names and forms to complete.

Marketing researchers have long valued the power of images. According to experts at 3M and Zabisco, 90 percent of information transmitted to the brain is visual, and the brain processes visuals thousands of times faster than text. Also, 65 percent of people are visual learners.

For visual learners, that picture memory-jogger is essential: What we’ve heard from students is, by the end of the semester, with so many different instructors, they’re really not sure who they’re evaluating and they’d like to provide appropriate feedback. If there’s a picture affiliated with your MEdTech profile, this helps sort out who’s who.

  1. Email confusion: Sending the right message to the right person

With a last name like “Suart”, I rarely run into email directory confusion, it’s more misspellings I worry about. However, if we also had a Theresa Stuart in UGME as either a student, staff or faculty member, you can bet there’d be some confusion. Or ask Matt Simpson – but which one? Matt Simpson, Manager of the Education Technology Unit, or Dr. Matt Simpson, Department of Family Medicine? (By the way, welcome to UGME, Dr. Simpson!). Again, photo identifiers can help resolve these types of issues.

Remember that MEdTech is a password-protected learning management system and is only accessible by our students, staff and affiliated faculty.

 

Adding your photo to your MEdTech profile is an easy two-step process: Get a picture and Upload it to MEdTEch.

Get a picture you can live with:

A well-cropped selfie from your iPhone, a snap-shot by a family member, or call me, and I’ll come to your office and take one.

Upload it to MEdTech:

(Click on any of these images to see a larger view of the screen shots)

From your dashboard MEdTech page, after logging in: in the upper right hand banner of the page, click on “My Profile” (if you haven’t uploaded a picture, you’ll have the silhouette icon) Screen shot 2015-07-06 at 1.44.28 PM

 

 

 

On your profile page, move your mouse arrow over the silhouette icon and select “Upload Photo” Screen shot 2015-07-06 at 1.45.46 PM

 

 

 

 

Select “Browse” (lower left hand of the pop-up) and select your photo file name), Click “Upload.”Screen shot 2015-07-06 at 1.52.37 PM

 

 

Voila! You’re done.

 

 

 

Thanks to all faculty and staff who have already uploaded their photos.

Questions or concerns, please feel free to email me at theresa.suart@queensu.ca — or find me in the MEdTech directory.

 

 

 

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June Curricular Leaders Retreat held: EPAs, Remediation and Feedback, oh my!

After bringing another busy semester to a close, UGME curricular leaders took time to reflect on the past year and take part in workshops and discussion groups on a number of areas of the curriculum at their semi-annual Curricular Leaders Retreat on June 19. The aim of the retreat was to share information and to generate ideas and solutions to address teaching and assessment challenges.

In his end of year report, Associate Dean Anthony Sanfilippo highlighted accomplishments of the past year as well as announced new faculty appointments.

After providing an entertaining and informative review of the process of curriculum renewal that UGME has undergone over the last several years, including the development of the “Red Book” objectives, Dr. Sanfilippo discussed how the emerging use of Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) will relate to and refine our existing curriculum and assessment processes.

Dr. Sue Moffatt presented an information session on how the three classroom-based “C” courses relate to both clerkship and the rest of the curriculum.

In a discussion about Service-Learning, led by Dr. Sanfilippo, faculty brainstormed ways additional service-learning opportunities could be created for medical students and others as well as ways they could support and encourage students in these endeavours. The Service Learning Advisory Panel will consider their suggestions and recommendations.

Feedback workshop
Cherie Jones and Andrea Winthrop leading the workshop on narrative feedback.

As a follow-up to last year’s popular workshop on remediation strategies, Michelle Gibson, Richard Van Wylick and Renee Fitzpatrick presented “Remediation 2” with additional cases and strategies.

 

For the afternoon, participants chose between a session on writing narrative feedback or one on making ExamSoft work for you.

Designed in particular for faculty working in clerkship, clinical skills and facilitated small group learning (FSGL), for the workshop on narrative feedback, Cherie Jones and Andrea Winthrop provided concrete examples and solutions to situations faculty routinely encounter when needing to provided constructive feedback to students. This included a discussion of ways in which oral and written feedback differ.

In the ExamSoft workshop, Michelle Gibson, Eleni Katsoulas and Amanda Consack worked with faculty to show how to tag mid-term and final assessments to match to assigned MCC presentations and Red Book objectives as well as coding for author and key word. Using these ExamSoft tools upfront makes it possible to use built-in reports to blueprint assessments, rather than having to do so manually. (For more on ExamSoft, check out the team’s poster from CCME at this link.)

To wrap up the day’s activities, pre-clerkship and clerkship course directors brainstormed with competency leads for ways the milestones identified for these intrinsic roles can be met throughout the curriculum. How to highlight and incorporate patient safety in different courses was also considered.

Documents from the Retreat are available to curricular leaders under “Retreats” on the Faculty Resources Community Page.

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New career advisor appointed

Dr. Anthony Sanfilippo, Associate Dean of Undergraduate Medicine has announced that Susan Haley has joined the staff of the UGME Student Affairs office as a career advisor. She will be working with Kelly Howse and Renee Fitzpatrick in UGME’s growing Career Advising group.

An anesthesiologist, Dr. Haley has practiced in Kingston for 16 years. Prior to moving to Kingston, she worked at Mount Sinai at the University of Toronto. While in Toronto, she also worked in the area of chronic pain treatment. Her current work interest is obstetrical anesthesiology.

Since coming to Kingston, Dr. Haley has becoming involved in undergraduate medical education and has really enjoyed working with medical students, she said in an interview.

“When this [position] came up, it seemed to be something I’d be interested in, helping students beginning their path to success.”

She noted that her own career has included a variety of experiences, including being a peer assessor at CPSO and sitting on a number of OMA committees.

“I’d like to share the perspective of medicine that involves doing other things besides practicing medicine on a day-to-day basis,” she added.

For appointments with Dr. Haley or any of the Student Affairs advisors, please contact  learnerwellness@queensu.ca , stop by the Student Affairs office in the Undergraduate Medical Office or call the Learner Wellness Assistant at 613-533-6000 x78451.

 

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Celebration of Teaching explores curricular innovations

The Annual Faculty of Health Sciences Celebration of Teaching was held June 12 to celebrate innovative efforts of teaching, learning and scholarship in the faculty, sponsored by the Office of Health Sciences Education.

This year’s theme was Connecting Curricular Innovations to Health Sciences Competencies. The conference featured an opening panel, a facilitated poster session, a dozen “swap shops” and a keynote speaker to wrap up the day-long event.

The opening panel explored competency frameworks across health sciences disciplines. The panel featured Kathleen Norman (Physical Therapy); Catherine Donnelly (Occupational Therapy); Rosemary Brander (Interprofessional Education and Practice); Cheryl Pulling (Nursing) and moderator Damon Dagnone (Medicine).

The facilitated poster session featured 25 posters in five categories. Posters presented research and other projects by faculty, students and staff members.

Key-note Speaker  Damon Dagnone
Key-note Speaker
Damon Dagnone

For the half-hour swap-shops, presenters discussed a curricular innovation and led a discussion with participants about challenges and successes they had experienced. Topics ranged from how to give, receive and respond to feedback, to using YouTube in your teaching; from structured interprofessional observerships to engaging undergraduate students in research. Participants could attend up to three swap-shop sessions.

The keynote presentation was delivered by J. Damon Dagnone, Faculty Lead for Competency Based Medical Education (CBME) for Postgraduate Medical Education. Dr. Dagnone is also an assistant professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine.

In his presentation, Dr. Dagnone invited attendees to consider three questions:

  • How do we extract competency from our everyday healthcare environments?
  • How are current practices of CBE implementation (un)realistic?
  • How should assessment help drive the agenda?

Dr. Dagnone’s presentation acknowledged both the challenges presented and the necessity for embracing competency-based frameworks and challenging time-based-only paradigms.

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Medical grad receives Queen’s University Agnes Benidickson Tricolour Award

One of the highlights at Convocation on May 21 was the admission of one of the Meds Class of 2015 to the Queen’s University Tricolour Society.

Benjamin Frid was admitted to the Society through the Agnes Benidickson Tricolour Award—the highest honour given to a Queen’s student for non-academic, non-athletic activities. Recipients are chosen by their fellow students.

For Frid, it had been a bit of a wait to be inducted into the Tricolour Society: He was actually nominated and accepted for the award in 2012-2013, but it is presented upon graduation.

The award—named after Dr. Agnes Benidickson, Chancellor of Queen’s University from 1980 to 1996—is presented in recognition for valuable and distinguished service of outstanding individuals to the University. According to the Tricolour website, “such service may have been confined to a single field, or it may have taken the form of a significant contribution over a wide range of activities.” For Frid, his contributions definitely spanned a range of activities. Among those contributions included in the citation read at convocation were:

  • He founded the Kingston chapter of Making Waves, a student-run organization that provides affordable private swimming lessons for children with disabilities
  • He was Aesculapian Society president
  • He formed of a wellness committee to address mental health issues for medical students
  • He was founder and president of the Health Care Management Interest Group, a team involved with addressing the deficit in financial literacy that many physicians today are burdened with

“Ben’s spirited inclusive, and enthusiastic approach to life has influenced the lives of innumerous students and the greater Kingston community for the better,” the citation said.

Frid’s journey to this award actually began with his first undergraduate degree where he had what he describes as “limited extra-curricular involvement.”

“It left me feeling that I had really missed out on a lot of interesting and important opportunities,” he wrote in an email interview. “I think university is the perfect time to start becoming more involved. You are surrounded by such energetic people and a university that wants to help students do great things, I really think it’s the best time in person’s life to try and make a difference and improve the lives of those around them.”

Frid got more involved at the Telfer School of Business at the University of Ottawa where he started the Ottawa Making Waves chapter, was a teaching assistant and began taking leadership courses. This new habit of involvement continued when he came to Queen’s School of Medicine.

Ben Frid
Ben Frid immediately after Convocation. (Photographs courtesy of Ben Frid’s family)

“At Queen’s, I was heavily involved in student government through our class council, our Aesculapian Society, and the Canadian Federation of Medical Students (in addition to lots of other groups and projects), but by far my favourite was Making Waves!”

Frid admits that balancing extra-curricular activities with medical school studies wasn’t always easy. “I had to learn some new skills and become a more organized person,” he said. “Fortunately, Queen’s faculty are very supportive of students who want to be involved,” he added.

“I think extra-curriculars are an important component of mindfulness,” he pointed out. “Just like eating well and exercising regularly, finding consistent positive and rewarding experiences are a key part of managing the heavy workload of medical school.”

“Even though it can create a bit of a time crunch, I think I was a far better medical student for the extra responsibilities I took on.”

“The beginning of medical school should not be the end of your hobbies and passions,” Frid said when asked for advice for the incoming Class of 2019. “Grow them! Pursue what you have loved to do, and take advantage of all the new experiences that will soon present themselves. Your fellow medical students are every bit as passionate as you are, and together you can do incredible things.”

Frid noted that he is “inspired by the people I have had the privilege of working for,” and pointed to one example from the early days of Making Waves in Kingston.

“I remember wondering how long it would take for instructors and their kids to bond, and for us to start seeing evidence of value we were generating for the community,” he said. “While setting up for just the second lesson, I remember watching one of our kids recognizing his instructor in the aquatic centre lobby, his eyes opening wide as could be, and him launching into a full speed sprint with arms outstretched to go hug his instructor he had only met one week before.  I knew then that we had happened upon something special and that memory has stayed with me.”

Frid will begin his Family Medicine residency in July here at Queen’s. As he moves on to the post-graduate program, he’s left Making Waves in good hands. “The medical students in the classes of 2017 and 2018 are doing an incredible job of growing Making Waves from where we left off, and are to be commended for their hard work and successes,” he said. “Making Waves Kingston is a Queen’s-wide initiative with key leadership from the Queen’s School of Medicine, and it is thriving under its new leadership.”

According to the Society’s web page, Frid is the first medical student to receive the Tricolour since Ahmed Kayssi (Meds2009) in 2005-2006. Because of this, Frid was “particularly proud to be attracting some attention to the amazing things Queen’s Medical students have been doing year in and year out.”

Frid said he felt very honoured to receive the award and was quick to point out that he had much support along the way: “None of the projects I was involved in were individual, so I feel very grateful to the QMed faculty and students, particularly my classmates in the Class of 2015, that helped those projects be successful.”

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Queen’s student wins 2015 Sandra Banner Award for Leadership

Queen’s Class of 2015 student Eve Purdy received the CaRMS Sandra Banner Award for Student Leadership at the CaRMS forum held in conjunction with the Canadian Conference on Medical Education (CCME) in Vancouver on April 26.

Richard Reznick, Dean of the Queen’s Faculty of Health Sciences, presented the award on behalf of the award selection committee.

“Eve has always challenged herself to be a leader and is never afraid to ask questions and really to push the limits,” Reznick said. “She has a passion for evidence-based medicine and has demonstrated a strong ambition to be a leader in this field.”

“In just the last two years, Eve has made notable contributions to medical education, particularly in advancing and promoting the role of social media in medical education,” he said. “She’s also served as a mentor and an educator for our younger students. She has a stellar, unbelievable record of volunteerism and has won numerous academic and community awards.”

Reznick noted: “Her unique combination of energy, dedication and leadership stand out as an example we can all admire.”

“I’m also absolutely thrilled that Eve’s chosen to become a resident at Queen’s next year, so we have the great honour of having her for the next five years at Queen’s,” he added. “I have no doubt that this award will contribute to Eve’s continued development in medical education.”

“I am completely overwhelmed to be accepting this award in an audience that is chock full of people I admire greatly,” Purdy said.

Citing the Queen’s School of Medicine motto which translates as “a doctor works with her hands and her heart”, Purdy observed that “during my time at Queen’s, I’ve also realized that great educators and great leaders do work exactly in the same way.”

“Queen’s is just full of people who are going to support students and who are willing to build us up to become the best that we can,” she said. “I don’t want to start naming names, because there are way too many people at the Queen’s School of Medicine who have supported me and all of my classmates on our journey. And I’m thrilled to be there for another five years.” Purdy will be an emergency medicine resident as of July 1.

Purdy also thanked her mentors from the online world of medical education. “There’s a completely inspiring group of educators who are engaging online. Not only have they helped me get through medical school by producing free content that I found very accessible and useful for learning clinical material, but they’re engaging with each other in a way that is collaborative, and is in itself a form of leadership.” She encouraged others to join this online discussion by getting a Twitter account and finding people who have like-interests. “It’s changes my world and my path and my journey,” she said.

“I’m very appreciative of this award and will use it to its full potential,” she said.

The purpose of these annual awards, established in 2013 by the CaRMS board of directors, is to encourage the development of future leaders in medicine, through public recognition and financial support of one undergraduate and one postgraduate medical trainee who has demonstrated interest in/aptitude for leadership.

Each award is accompanied by up to $3,000 in funding to support learners’ proposed leadership activities, such as leadership conference feeds, formal leadership education at an accredited educational institution, or for a leadership elective.

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Call for information on community projects

As mentioned in a previous blog post, the UGME Service Learning Panel is interested in compiling an inventory of student volunteer initiatives which may fit the definition of service-learning.

The call was sent to all students through the class presidents’ weekly email. Students are encouraged to send information about their current initiatives, even if these may not 100 percent fit the definition of service-learning.

Deadline for submitting information for this inventory call is May 15. Submissions are to be sent to the Service Learning Advisory Panel via Brian Rutz brutz@queensu.ca

Full details on this call are included below:

UGME Service Learning Advisory Panel

Call for Established Community Actions

Background

Recognizing value of Citizenship in the MD program we, here at Queen’s Medicine, “believe that our students should be active contributors and participants in the leadership of their communities, society and professional organizations” and wish to encourage, facilitate, and support such endeavours.

As such, the Undergraduate Medical Education Service Learning Advisory Panel would like to offer recognition and support students within the Faculty of Medicine who are currently engaged in service learning.

What is Service Learning?

Service Learning extends volunteer service to include deliberate preparation (including where feasible consulting stakeholders), the service, and formal reflection on learning. For this call, Service Learning may include development of a new project or may be participation in existing volunteer opportunities that meet a previously identified community concern.

Current Focus

For this call, the Service Learning Advisory Panel is seeking to identify, recognize, and support students and student groups currently engaged in service learning and request their input and assistance in formalizing and incorporating service learning as a permanent program within Undergraduate Medicine. A Service Learning Fund has been established for this purpose. (A second call will be issued for new projects).

2015 UGME Service Learning Panel Call for Community Actions

If you are currently engaged in the community (individually or as a group) in a manner that meets all or some of the definition of service learning, as described above, we want to hear from you!

Please provide us with a brief description of your current community engagement. We ask that you keep your description to a maximum of 300 words.

Deadline to reply to call: Friday May 15, 2015

Instructions for responding to call: email brutz@queensu.ca

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Bollywood, gnomes and time travel, oh my!— 45th Annual Medical Variety Night promises an entertaining evening

Anyone wandering through the second floor of the Medical Building after hours some days this term could be forgiven for wondering if they’d accidentally ended up in a dance studio instead of a medical school.

What was actually happening was rehearsal for one of the dance numbers for this year’s Medical Variety Night (MVN). The show takes place Friday, April 10 and Saturday, April 11 at 7 p.m. (doors open at 6:30 p.m.) at Duncan McArthur Auditorium at 511 Union Street West and will be hosted by Emily Kerr (MEDS2017) and Alessia Gallipoli (MEDS2017).

I set out to find out more about what’s in store at the 45th edition of MVN, “House of CaRMS” by emailing this year’s co-directors: Beverly Guan (MEDS2017), Jimin Lee (MEDS2017), Jordan Sugarman (MEDS2018) and Nathan Terrana (MEDS2018).

This year’s theme of “House of CaRMS” was selected by popular vote, inspired by the American political drama series, “House of Cards.”

“The television series features scheming, power-hungry characters doing everything it takes to climb the ladder of success,” Guan wrote back on behalf of her co-directors. “Naturally, we saw some potentially humorous parallels with the CaRMS process.”

Co-Directors’ Top 5 Reasons to Check out MVN:

Discover hidden talents of medical students at Queen’s

Find out what we have been doing with our spare time

Support everyone who has put their time and effort into MVN

Donate to great charitable causes

Have a great time!

The co-directors and performers are keeping as much of the program under wraps as possible (we have to go see the show to find out more), but they tease that we can expect hilarious class skits and videos—“featuring gnomes, time travel, CanMEDS competencies, and more!”—the largest Bollywood act in MVN history, the first ever QMed Qrew hip hop number, a concert pianist, and many talented musicians and singers.

MVN2015 Poster - AG

It’s that kind of enthusiasm and talent that has helped ensure MVN is an enduring QMed tradition.

“Whether students want to have their moment in the spotlight, film promotional videos, manage the show behind the wings, or even just bake for our bake sale, there is a role for everyone in MVN,” Guan wrote.

MVN is a significant time investment to create two evenings of entertainment. Why do so many medical students pitch in? “Perhaps it is because it is during these grueling hours of preparation and rehearsal that we learn something important about ourselves, something we don’t learn sitting in class,” Guan wrote. “We learn how to deal with our frustrations and manage our insecurities. We learn about the joy of striving for perfection but also the beauty of imperfection. And, most importantly, we learn that succeeding together, as a team, is just as fulfilling — if not more so, than succeeding as an individual.”

Each year, MVN proceeds support charities selected by the students. This year, they’ve chosen the Class of 2017 project, “Reads for Paeds” and Almost Home, a local Kingston charity.

“Given that a significant portion of the class in involved in the Reads for Paeds project, we wanted to collaborate with them in raising funds to print storybooks, written and illustrated by our class, to explain common chronic illnesses affecting children,” Guan wrote. “We also wanted to select a local charity that supports families with children who are receiving medical treatment, and Almost home fit this criteria perfectly.”

More information on both Reads for Paeds and Almost Home is available on the MVN website: www.houseofcarms.com

In addition to funds raised through ticket sales, there are other fundraisers at the show, including a bake sale, raffle tickets and a silent auction for one large MVN banner featuring pictures of the performers. Donations are also being accepted (all donations greater than $50 receive a tax receipt).

Tickets are sold for $12 online and $15 at the door. Online ticket purchases and online donations can be made here.

In the meantime, check out the MVN promo video here and see the hosts explain why they volunteered here. And we’ll see you at the show!

 

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Faculty annoucements

Dr. Anthony Sanfilippo, Associate Dean of Undergraduate Medicine has announced three new teaching assignments.

Taylor
David Taylor

David Taylor will be taking on the leadership of the Internal Medicine Training Program as of July 2015.  Dr. Taylor is an internist and a member of the division of General Internal Medicine. His clinical practice is focused on acute care general internal medicine, as well as refractory hypertension.

“I think this is great for both David and the program,” Dr. Sanfilippo said. “During his time as the Director of the Internal Medicine core clerkship rotation, he made great strides in improving the experience for our students, as evidenced by significant improvements in their performance in a number of key outcomes, and increased interest in our own IM training program by our graduating students.” Dr. Taylor was also a valuable contributor to the Clerkship Committee and the UG program in general, he added.

Milne
Laura Milne

Laura Milne will be assuming the role of Director of the IM core clerkship.  Dr. Milne completed her undergraduate medical studies, general internal medicine residency, and general internal medicine fellowship at Queen’s University.  She worked as a community general internist prior to joining the Division of General Internal Medicine at Queen’s in 2013. Her clinical practice is focused on acute care general internal medicine, stroke prevention, and refractory hypertension.

“Laura’s done a stellar job with the Term 4 Clinical Skills program and is well suited to this new challenge,” Dr. Sanfilippo said. Dr. Taylor will work with Dr. Milne during her transition to this new role until he officially takes over the training program in July.

Garland
Jocelyn Garland

Jocelyn Garland will be taking on leadership for the Term 4 Clinical Skills course.  Dr. Garland completed Internal Medicine and Nephrology Training at the University of Western Ontario in 2001. Since that time, Dr. Garland has been working as an Assistant Professor of Nephrology at Queen’s University, where she is a clinical researcher. In 2009, Dr. Garland completed her Masters in Community Health and Epidemiology, and she is a member of the Queen’s University Vascular Calcification Research Group. Dr. Garland is also a highly regarded teacher, having received two Department of Medicine teaching awards for her work in teaching medical students. She served as the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada Program Director for the Nephrology Fellowship Program at Queen’s University from 2006- 2011.

“I think this is a great fit given her interests, prior experience and career interests,” Dr. Sanfilippo said.  “She will work with Laura as the current course continues, and Laura has graciously agreed to help with the review of this year’s course, and development of next year’s iteration.”  In this new role, Dr. Garland will be working with Kathy Bowes (coordinator) and Cherie Jones (Clinical Skills Director).

 

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Service-learning: Asking questions to learn what’s happening

As discussed in a previous blog post, formalizing opportunities for service-learning is increasingly important to schools of medicine, both for the inherent merits of service-learning itself (for both learners and communities), as well as for accreditation considerations.

Queen’s UGME has been exploring ways to address service-learning more systematically, including appointing a Service Learning Advisory Panel. One of the interesting things about service, however, is because of its very nature, it often happens quietly, behind the scenes.

In order to better support undergraduate medical students engaged in service-learning projects, the Panel wants to shine a light on these projects. With this in mind, the Panel, whose members include students, faculty and administrative representatives is issuing a call for information about current community service projects.

Not all volunteer projects meet criteria to be considered service-learning. There are many definitions of service-learning (in fact, there are close to 200 in the literature). The definition Queen’s UGME has adopted (based on one used by the LCME) states:

“Service-learning is a structured learning experience that combines community service with preparation and reflection. Medical students engaged in service-learning provide community service in response to community-identified concerns and learn about the context in which service is provided, the connection between their service and their academic coursework, and their roles as citizens and professionals.”

The key triad includes planning (including consulting relevant stakeholders), service, and reflecting on learning. Using this definition, there may be volunteer projects are or could be service-learning as well.

For example, Queen’s Medicine Health Talks sprang from a student interest group. When these first started, the students prepared lectures (under the supervision of practicing physicians) on a number of clinically-relevant topics and invited members of the community to the School of Medicine to hear these lectures. The aim was to welcome and integrate the Kingston community in medical learning. Extending this into service-learning, the students now engage in collaborative planning with both faculty and community members. As well, the lecture series now includes community centres as venues. A post-service evaluation helps students reflect on their learning.

The students involved in the Health Talks took that extra step and asked community members: “What do you want to learn about?”

In the same way that great service-learning projects include a key step of consulting the community about what’s important, the Service Learning Panel wants to hear from members of the UGME community about what they’re already doing by way of service-learning. The next question is how can UG help? Then, what else would you like to do and what support do you need to make this happen?

The Service Learning Advisory Panel’s goal isn’t to change our students’ focus on service: we just want provide support and recognition for these important endeavours in our communities.

The first call is for Established community actions. A second call will focus on new projects. Look for these in the regular UG email communication to all classes. We’re looking forward to hearing from you.

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