We’ve been focusing on classroom-based teaching tips in recent blog posts, this week, we focus on some practical tips for clinical teaching for clinicians working with learners while using telephone and computers for patient appointments.

By Debra Hamer, MD FRCPC, and Theresa Suart, MEd

Image is an overhead view of a laptop computer, smart phone, coffee cup and stethoscope.

Since March and continuing for some patient populations, physicians have shifted to “remote” technologies to conduct patient encounters, which used to take place face-to-face. This has complicated how to readily include learners – clinical clerks and residents – in those encounters.

First – let’s just put this out there – we don’t like the word “virtual” to describe working with patients using telephone or computer interfaces. This is not simulated care, it’s actual care!

Whether you’re using telephone appointments or a computer-facilitated patient interface, it can be a challenge to incorporate learners. We’re providing some suggestions based on telephone and OTN (in this case); these can be modified for your own tech situations. (As always, feel free to reach out to the UG Education team for help brainstorming solutions.)

The tasks associated with each can be divided into three parts: before, during, and after. These are things you likely do automatically with in-clinic or in-hospital patient visits that include learners because you’ve been doing it for years. Working with “remote” technologies just requires a bit of deliberate thought to what that preparation, appointment, and debrief looks like.

Depending on what social distancing is in effect, you may be in the same room as your learner, or you, the learner, and the patient may be in three different locations. The suggestions below assume you are in three different locations. If you and the learner can be in the same room, this will be simplified.

Telephone Appointments

(You may book your appointments yourself or have an administrative assistant who does so.)

Prior to Encounter:

  • When the patient’s appointment is booked, ask if a learner can be involved with the appointment.
  • If there’s a reminder call, include a reminder that a learner will be involved (if they said yes, of course!)
  • Make sure you’re in a room by yourself with no intrusions or distractions. This might seem self-evident, but work-from-home situations can change day-by-day.
  • Ensure your phone is set up to block your caller ID. On an iPhone, you need to deselect this under settings.
  • Ten minutes before the patient call, call the learner and review the referral and any pertinent information from the chart, since students won’t have access to the chart if they are not physically in the clinic. At that point, you can answer any questions or concerns the learner has

The encounter:

  • If you’re using a phone with “conference” capabilities (adding a participant) you can keep the learner on the phone while you initiate the call with the patient. (On iPhone, this is “add a call, put in the patient’s number, then press merge calls).
  • Once the patient answers, check to ensure both the patient and learner are on the call. All three participants should be able to hear each other.
  • In the greeting, you can remind the patient of the learner’s role on the call.
  • Make sure the patient understands the potential privacy issues with cell phones and consents to continue, then outline what to expect during the appointment.
  • Proceed with the patient interview/discussion/assessment as you would do ordinarily.
  • Depending on the learner’s stage, at this point they may be listening in; if not, let the patient know you will mute yourself and unmute yourself near the end to join back in. (If the learner is going for too long or going off the rails, you don’t need to wait until the end, simply unmute yourself and redirect them, as you would in a face-to-face encounter).
  • At the end of the appointment, if you haven’t already, you can unmute yourself, ask any questions and finish off.

The debrief:

  • After ending the call with the patient, call the learner back and debrief the encounter.
  • If it’s a senior learner, you may take the option to call the patient back – talk to the learner, find out a diagnosis and plan and then call back together with this. This will vary on the learner’s level. (Be sure the patient knows you are going to do this!)

Variation:

  • With a more senior learner, with the patient’s consent, you could use a three-step appointment: the learner initiates the call with patient, then ends that call to confer with you (by phone or other means), then the learner or you calls the patient back with the plan for going forward.

Pro-tip: If you use headphones, then there’s less reverberation and you can use your hands while you’re listening to the phone calls.

Computer-mediated appointment:

(Dr. Hamer uses OTN, you may use another platform. These instructions assume the patient has agreed to an internet-mediated appointment and has received the log-in instructions by email).

Preparation

  • Make sure your computer is set up with a neutral background with nothing to distract the patient.
  • Also, make sure you’re in a room by yourself with no intrusions or distractions.
  • Telephone the learner 10 minutes before the appointment time and review the case with them. End this call

The appointment:

  • Launch the appointment with the patient. (In OTN, this is either “make a video call” or clicking on the link from your schedule). Use your program’s function to add the learner. (On OTN, it’s “add a guest”
  • Ensure the patient still consents to continue with the appointment online, and outline how the appointment will go. Then mute yourself and block your video so it’s just a black box at the bottom of the screen. The learner and patient will just see each other. (This is less distracting)
  • Re-enter as needed (similar to the telephone suggestions above).
  • If there is time available on the appointment, ask the patient to stand by for a few minutes. You and the learner both mute and block your video and have a telephone discussion about the case.
  • Come back to the call to see the patient. (Make sure the gap is no more than five minutes).

Debrief

  • Once the computer-mediated appointment has finished, call the learner back to talk about the case.

Do you have advice or suggestions for facilitating learning with these types of patient encounters? Share your advice in the comments.