Dr. Gary Tithecott

In his keynote address at the UGME fall faculty retreat on December 10, Dr. Gary Tithecott addressed the topic of Leading change for success in medical education during challenging times. Dr. Tithecott is Associate Dean, Undergraduate Medical Education at Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University.

During his presentation, Dr. Tithecott cited a few books and mentioned others as worth delving into. As I like to do here, I’ve created a “Top 5” list from those he mentioned (OK, it’s actually six books, as he recommended two from a single author). These books are practical and accessible reads with clear advice, he said.

There’s still time to add some or all of these to your holiday wish list.

 

 

 

Mindset: The New Psychology of Success by Carol S. Dweck

The traditional attitude – Fixed Mindset – dictated that your fate is determined by skill you have genetically and that you demonstrate, Dr. Tithecott explained. With a Growth Mindset , by contrast, asserts that with dedication, encouragement and effort you can learn from and with others to increase your ceiling.

Since one key responsibility for a leader is to develop other people, a Growth Mindset is essential, he said. Citing an article from Forbes magazine, he noted a Growth Mindset allows leaders to

  1. Be open-minded
  2. Be comfortable with ambiguity & uncertainty
  3. Have strong situational awareness
  4. have a greater sense of preparedness
  5. have clarity on what others expect
  6. Take ownership
  7. Grow with people
  8. Eliminate mediocrity and complacency
  9. Break down silos

Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance by Angela Duckworth

One key to success in leadership, Tithecott said, is in the power of working hard and sticking to it. For a leader it’s supporting someone to go outside of their box. He quoted Duckworth:

Grit, in a word, is stamina. But it’s not just stamina in your effort. It’s also stamina in your direction, stamina in your interests. If you are working on different things but all of them very hard, you’re not really going to get anywhere. You’ll never become an expert.

Leading Change  and XLR8 by John P. Kotter

OK, this is actually TWO books, not one. Noting that no talk on change and change leadership is complete without including Kotter, Dr. Tithecott recommended both Leading Change and the more recent XLR8.

He reviewed Kotter’s list of why change fails:

  1. Not Establishing a Great Enough Sense of Urgency
  2. Not Creating a Powerful Enough Guiding Coalition
  3. Lacking a Vision
  4. Under communicating the Vision by a Factor of Ten
  5. Not Removing Obstacles to the New Vision
  6. Not Systematically Planning for, and Creating, Short-Term Wins
  7. Declaring Victory Too Soon
  8. Not Anchoring Changes in the Corporation’s Culture

Leaders Eat Last: Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don’t by Simon Sinek

 The symbolism of leaders eating last – exemplified by the US Marine Corp chow line, described by Sinek – points to leaders who put their team first. This in turn, leads to more acceptance of the challenges of change, Tithecott said.

The Leader Who Had No Title by Robin Sharma

Leadership can be found in different places and doesn’t necessarily mean the person “at the top”. Where and how leadership for change can be developed can vary, Tithecott said, recommending Sharma’s book.