At precisely 1 p.m. on Monday, November 6th 1854, Dr. James Sampson rose to address the twenty-three students who would become the first medical class entering the Queen’s School of Medicine. They were gathered in an upper room of a former military infirmary at 75 Princess Street, a building that still stands today, currently the site of a popular local hardware store.

Dr. Sampson, an Irish and British trained former military surgeon who was instrumental in the development of Kingston

Dr. James Sampson

General Hospital and would go on to serve multiple terms as Mayor of Kingston, was Professor of Clinical Medicine and Surgery. He was also President (essentially the first Dean) of the medical school. He introduced himself and his five colleagues who would form the first teaching faculty and then turned the podium over to Dr. John Stewart, Professor of Anatomy, Physiology and Practical Anatomy, who would deliver the first lecture.

In his book “Medicine at Queen’s: A Peculiarly Happy Relationship”, the late Dr. Tony Travill describes the event in vivid detail.  He notes that the room in which they met was “deplorably filthy”, but appearances did not deter the faculty members who felt appearances did not matter much “as there are no bacteria then in Kingston” meaning, presumably, there was no epidemic or plague currently active.

In that inaugural address Dr. Stewart spoke of “the importance of anatomy and physiology to the proper practice of surgery and medicine”. He went on to quote Galen who described anatomy as “the most beautiful hymn which man can chant in honor of his creator”. In finishing “He recounted the events leading to the school’s founding and exhorted the students to recognize that their future success depended more on themselves than on their professors: the only barrier to that success was idleness.”

Last week, Dr. Sampson’s successor, Dr. Richard Reznick, welcomed the one hundred and sixty-fourth group to be welcomed to their studies and to the profession by their faculty. Dr. Reznick challenged them to be restless in the pursuit of their goals and the betterment of our patients and society.

Photo by Lars Hagberg

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A few facts about our new colleagues:

They were selected from a pool of 4836 highly qualified students who submitted applications last fall.

Of the 104 students the average age is 24 years.  Forty-nine members of the class are women and 55 are men. They hail from no fewer than 43 communities across Canada, including; Alma, Belleville, Brampton, Burlington, Cambridge, Dundas, Etobicoke, Golden Lake, Guelph, Kingston, Lively, London, Maple, Markham, Milton, Mississauga, Nepean, Nobleton, North York, Oakville, Odessa, Ottawa, Peterborough, Richmond Hill, Sarnia, Scarborough, Sittsville, Thornhill, Toronto, Whitby, Edmonton, Leduc, Calgary, Vancouver, Maple Ridge, Victoria, Coquitlam, West Vancouver, North Vancouver, Winnipeg, St John’s, New Minas, Halifax.

Eighty-six of our new students have completed an Undergraduate degree, and sixteen have postgraduate degrees, including three PhDs. The universities they have attended and degree programs are listed below:

Universities of Undergraduate Studies

Acadia University
Brown University
Carleton University
Harvard University
McGill University
McMaster University
Queen’s University
Quest University
Ryerson University
Simon Fraser University
St. Francis Xavier University
Trent University
University of Alberta
University of British Columbia
University of Calgary
University of Guelph
University of Ottawa
University of Toronto
University of Victoria
University of Waterloo
University of Ontario Inst. Of Tech
Western University
Wilfred Laurier University
York University

 

Undergraduate Degree Majors

Administration
Anatomy and Cell Biology
Biochemistry
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Biological Science
Biology
Biomedical Discovery and Commercialization
Biomedical Science
Chemical and Physical Biology
Chemical Biology
Chemical Engineering
Chemistry
Computer Science and Biology
English Language and Literature
Epidemiology and Biostatistics
Foods and Nutrition
Gender Studies
Global Experience
Health and Disease
Health Sciences
Health Studies
Integrated Science
Kinesiology
Kinesiology and Health Science
Knowledge Integration
Life Physics
Life Sciences
Mathematics and Physics
Medical Health Informatics
Medical Sciences
Molecular Biology and Genetics
Neuroscience
Nursing
Nutritional Sciences
Occupational and Public Health
Pharmacology
Physiology
Policy Studies
Psychology

An academically diverse and very qualified group, to be sure.  Last week, they undertook a variety of orientation activities organized by both faculty and their upper year colleagues.

On their first day, they were called upon to demonstrate commitment to their studies, their profession and their future patients.  They were assured that they will have a voice within our school and be treated with the same respect they are expected to provide each other, their faculty and all patients and volunteers they encounter through their medical school careers.  In addition to Dr. Reznick, they were welcomed by Ms. Rae Woodhouse, Asesculapian Society President, who spoke on behalf of their upper year colleagues, and Dr. Rachel Rooney provided them an introduction to fundamental concepts of medical professionalism.

Over the course of the week, they met curricular leaders who will particularly involved in their first year, including Drs. Michelle Gibson and Lindsey Patterson (Year 1 Directors) and Drs. Cherie Jones and Laura Milne (Clinical Skills Directors).  They were also introduced to Dr. Renee Fitzpatrick (Director of Student Affairs) and our excellent learner support team, including Drs. Martin Ten Hove, Jason Franklin, Kelly Howse, Mike McMullen, Josh Lakoff, Craig Goldie and Erin Beattie, who oriented them to the Learner Wellness, Career Counseling and Academic Support services that will be provided throughout their years with us.  They met members of our superb administrative and educational support teams led by Jacqueline Findlay, Jennifer Saunders, Theresa Suart, Amanda Consack, and first year Curricular Coordinator Corinne Bochsma.

Dr. Susan Moffatt organized and coordinated the very popular and much appreciated “Pearls of Wisdom” session, where fourth year students nominate and introduce faculty members who have been particularly impactful in their education, and invite them to pass on a few words of advice to the new students.  This year, Drs. Dale Engen, Debra Hamer, Ingrid Harle, Annette Hay, Michael Leveridge, Joseph Newbigging, Louise Rang and Andy Thomas were selected for this honour.

On Friday, the practical aspects of curriculum, expectations of conduct and promotions were explained by Drs. Michelle Gibson and Lindsey Patterson.

Their Meds 2020 upper year colleagues welcomed them with a number of formal and not-so-formal events.  These included sessions intended to promote an inclusive learning environment, as well as orientations to Queen’s and Kingston, introductions to the mentorship program, and a variety of evening social events which, judging by appearances the next morning, were much enjoyed.

For all these arrangements, flawlessly coordinated, I’m very grateful to Rebecca Jozsa, our Admissions Officer, Admissions Assistant Rachel Bauder, and to Rae Woodhouse and her second year colleagues.

I invite you to join me in welcoming these new members of our school and medical community, and end with a quote Dr. Reznick shared with the incoming class, drawn from his favourite poet and recent Nobel Laureate Bob Dylan:

May your heart always be joyful
May your song always be sung
And may you stay forever young