By Daniel Rusiecki and Leah Allen (Meds 2021), “Lifestyle as Medicine” Symposium co-organizers


“The doctor of the future will give no medication, but will interest his patients in the care of the human frame, diet and in the cause and prevention of disease.” Thomas A. Edison

However far-fetched Mr. Edison’s vision may be, the idea of the first line of treatment being the intrinsic care of the human body and what we put into it is not off the mark whatsoever. Being the new kid on the block in first-year medical school, travelling through this area of modern medicine has one questioning how much exogenous medication would be needed if our society hasn’t progressed the way it has. What if cars never existed, and everyone had to walk to their daily job? Would over 20% of our Canadian population still be classified as obese? What if our food didn’t come out of a factory, or from a fast-food restaurant drive-thru window? Would we still be dealing with a diabetes epidemic where 3.4 million of our sisters, brothers, parents, friends and neighbours are injecting themselves with insulin  daily? The questions can go on and on, but they don’t answer one vital question: how do we move forward?

Practicing physicians will have approximately 2200 patient visits per year. With a career length of 35 years that’s almost 80,000 opportunities to influence the health and lives of these individuals. It’s crazy to think about how much influence one future physician can have, let alone the whole Queen’s undergraduate cohort, the residents, and affiliated physicians. If you are a future physician or practicing physician reading this post, would you rather prescribe your patient medication for their hypertension when they are 45 years old, or have the skills and knowledge to help them prevent hypertension when they are 30?

Equipping our workforce with the knowledge, skills and fearlessness to invoke a healthy lifestyle change is at the root of how we can move forward. Not only can we prolong and enhance the lives of our patients directly, but we can advocate to improve societal systems as a whole. We also have the opportunity to reduce the cost of our healthcare over the long-term due to the reduction of drug prescriptions and improvements in health of the general population.

The “Lifestyle as Medicine” symposium will be the start of a journey to better equip future or practicing physicians with the artillery necessary for these changes. The symposium will be take place Monday, February 12 from 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. in the School of Medicine Building, room 132A.

Dr. Robert Ross, a prominent researcher in the area of diabetes and related co-morbidities will speak on how cardiorespiratory fitness can be a significant vital sign for a patient’s health status. Andrea Brennan, a registered dietitian, will then take the floor to deliver key nutritional principles every physician should know, as well as shed light on current diet trends and the evidence supporting them. Dr. Chris Frank, a geriatric and palliative care physician, will then give insight on how he maintains healthy habits while being a busy physician. Finally, to get a taste of the patients perspective, Doug Dowling will speak about his passion for fitness and how the diagnosis of Crohn’s disease in his early 20s impacted him.

We hope you will join us for this thought-provoking, educational event.