1884 - Graduating ClassThe image below is taken from one of the many graduation photographs hanging on the walls of the School of Medicine Building. The young men in the photo are members of the 1884 graduating class. On the surface, one may be struck by the obvious differences to our current world, in terms of gender and ethnic diversity, medical knowledge, and the needs of the society they were about to enter as physicians. But I’m more struck by the similarities. Although their careers and lives have long since ended, those young faces frozen in the photograph seem eager, confident in their training, and perhaps a little nervous, about what challenges the future will bring, and how they will contribute to it. In all those regards, they are not at all unlike our current students.

This week, our most recent graduates begin the next phase of their medical careers. They also seemed eager and a little nervous when they started their medical education here at Queen’s in September of 2012, as may be apparent in the photograph taken that first day.

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That eager nervousness has probably not disappeared completely, but is hopefully supplemented by the same confidence in their abilities and desire to contribute that characterized so many of their predecessors. As they do, they’ve spread across this great country. Their areas of specialization and locations are summarized below. specialization

I’m particularly pleased to welcome back those who will be pursuing postgraduate education here at Queen’s.

Dr. Carl Chauvin, former Aesculapian Society President, will be starting the Anaesthiology program.

Drs. Kelly Fernandes, Matthew Legassic, Hollis Roth, Calvin Chan and Betty Chiu are entering Family Medicine.

Drs. Alex Astell, Roxana Chis, Josh Durbin, Ioulia Pronina and Kamran Shaikh are beginning their careers in Internal Medicine.

Drs. Alida Pokoradi, Stefania Spano and Ainsley Alexander have joined the Obstetrics and Gynecology, Orthopedic Surgery, and Psychiatry programs, respectively.

All of our graduates, I’m confident, will enhance and contribute to the programs they enter, and they do so with the best wishes of their undergraduate teaching faculty.

graduates2016Their graduation photograph has joined those of all their predecessors on the walls of our School of Medicine Building. These photographs remind those of us who serve as stewards of our medical education heritage that we have an entrusted responsibility to produce graduates who are not just academically successful, but who bring real value to the profession and society. That mission hasn’t fundamentally changed over the years, but requires very different approaches than it did in the past. Our purpose remains to attract eager, dedicated, capable young people to the profession, and to prepare them intellectually and personally for a career of service, promoting and providing for the health of our society and fellow citizens.

That’s what we’ve done. That’s what we do.

 

Anthony J. Sanfilippo, MD, FRCP(C)
Associate Dean,
Undergraduate Medical Education