Education

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By Lindsay Davidson, Director of Teaching, Learning, and Integration As classes (at least in years 1 and 2) have now ended, and teachers are perhaps thinking about courses that will resume in the fall, I wanted to provide you with an update of items from the TLIC. Some of these may already be familiar to you, but perhaps some are … Continue reading

I’m back with another perspective on collaborative learning.  This time, I’m indebted to Jim Sibley at UBC for giving me permission to use Framework for TBL Application Activity Reporting Facilitation by Loretta Whitehorne, Larry Michaelsen, and Jim Sibley, reproduced here: Our own Dr. Lindsay Davidson brought this home from the Team Based Learning (TBL) Collaborative’s Meeting this year. or click … Continue reading

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This first year I worked in a post-secondary setting, I was somewhat bemused when students asked me how I was going to spend my summer – they were heading out on a three or four month “break” and assumed I was doing the same. Some had work plans, some travel, some both. Regardless, they would be away from campus and … Continue reading

When I last wrote to you in March, I asked if you were a constructive or destructive problem-solver in groups.  We do a lot of small group (and larger group) learning in Queen’s UGME and I hoped to give a great framework to help prevent groups from imploding before or while constructive work could be done. We looked at identifying … Continue reading

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Queen’s UGME was well-represented in the oral and poster presentations at the recent Canadian Conference on Medical Education (CCME) held in Winnipeg, MB. Four oral presentations showcased UG work with another oral highlighting a teaching innovation in the QuARMS Program while a dozen posters featured Queen’s UG research and innovations featuring work by faculty, students, and staff. As explained on … Continue reading

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By Sallya Aleboyeh, MEDS 2019 A group of passionate and curious medical students chose to venture to Ottawa on the Family Day weekend this past February. Instead of visiting their families, they dove into history, with a group of equally-passionate curators and assistant legislators to Elizabeth May who also gave up time to give us private tours of: The Preservation … Continue reading

Here at Queen’s UGME, we use small group learning a great deal—from our prosections to PBL-based Facilitated Small Group Learning, to our TBL-based Small Group Learning. One very important aspect of group learning is preparing students to work successfully in teams. We do this in our first sessions in Orientation Week and in our new course, Introduction to Physician Roles. … Continue reading

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Several times over the last few weeks, I’ve had conversations with course directors and instructors about writing learning objectives. Many people – from award-winning educators to rookies and everyone in between – find writing learning objectives a challenge. The typical advice of write out who will do what under what conditions is vague, so it’s often not very helpful. “General” … Continue reading

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Do you want to build an eModule? Online modules, or eModules, are one of the content delivery methods available for use in our UGME curriculum. As with any content delivery method, the teacher’s job is to define objectives, then organize and deliver new content to students. Online modules can deliver content efficiently and creatively but they’re not without potential pitfalls, … Continue reading

Here’s a riddle for you: It may not be the type of writing you’re used to, and it requires thinking and reflection about an aspect of your work that you may not think as much about.  It has an intimidating word in the title and is the first hurdle in preparing an outline of your work.  What is it? Answer: … Continue reading

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6th annual Medical Student Research Showcase
Published Tue, September 19, 2017

By Drs. Heather Murray & Melanie Walker This year the School of Medicine is proud to invite you to the 6th annual Medical Student Research Showcase on Wednesday September 20th. This event celebrates the research achievements of our undergraduate medical students, with both posters and an oral plenary session featuring research performed by students while they have been enrolled in medical … Continue reading

Names matter
Published Mon, September 11, 2017

What’s in a name? That which we call a rose By any other name would smell as sweet.  So mused the ill-fated heroine in Romeo and Juliet, about her equally ill-fated love. In medicine and in teaching, however, names can mean a lot. The late Dr. Kate Granger of the United Kingdom was one of the strongest advocates for using … Continue reading

Welcoming Queen’s Meds 2021
Published Mon, September 4, 2017

The academic cycle is such that, for a few short weeks each summer, our student population reduces by a quarter. Last May, we graduated and congratulated the class of Meds 2017, who have now gone on to engage the next phase their careers. This week, our school continues its cycle of annual renewal, welcoming another eager and very promising group … Continue reading

Anatomy studies begin with focus on respect
Published Mon, August 28, 2017

Each September, first year students in the Queen’s Undergraduate Medical program quietly begin their studies in anatomy with a service acknowledging the donation of bodies that will be used in the lab assignments. This year the short service will be held on Tuesday, September 5 at 3 p.m. in room 032 of the Medical Building, following the introduction to the … Continue reading

Hope Amidst the Chaos of Charlottesville
Published Tue, August 22, 2017

Archbishop Desmond Tutu has defined hope as “being able to see that there is light despite all the darkness”. It is difficult to find such light amid the darkness of the recent events in Charlottesville and their aftermath. But such dark times are certainly not unprecedented in the history of our American neighbours. Two hundred and fifty-five years ago, 56 … Continue reading