New and improved resources for teaching, research and clinical application

By Suzanne Maranda, Head Health Sciences Librarian, Queen’s University Library

(Italics indicates a hyperlink)

Are you looking for images to include in your presentations or online modules? Two Thieme products are now available online and any materials from these two resources, one in Anatomy and the other in Pharmacology, can be extracted and included in any materials that will be used in a Queen’s course or presentation. Please contact me if you would like the complete license agreement.

Usage statistics of these resources will be collected to inform our decision about renewing or not. There are two other products (Physiology and Biochemistry) from the same publisher that could be added if requested and if funds permit. The two subjects purchased were chosen in consultation with the staff preparing online modules for the BHSC program.

The other tool I would like to highlight is relatively new as it was added in September 2017. Read by QxMD is a mobile app that enables a more direct link to the journal articles subscribed by the Library and to open access journals. The link provided here is to the page of all our mobile apps, please scroll to the instructions on how to get Read to work with the Queen’s resources. When you set up a profile, you can receive email notifications of new articles that match your profile. Check out the new “medical education” option that I requested be added. This company is quite responsive, I would be happy to pass on other topic/category suggestions.

Isabel is a diagnostic support tool that can be useful in clinics and possibly for teaching clinical skills. In December 2017 the librarians participated in a webinar with the developer of Isabel to review software enhancements.

Once a few symptoms are entered, a list of possible conditions is presented for follow-up, the coloured bar on the side (see green arrow) of the list indicates the strength of the likelihood (red is best). Notice the separate tab at the top of the results box for possible drugs ( ) that may cause the symptoms you entered. By clicking on a condition, you are taken to the Dynamed entry by default. If there is no Dynamed entry, then we link to BMJ Best Practice. A few other resources have been added for linking, you see these in the left hand box, so that one can choose to look at a different resource, or even consult more than one. There is a mobile version of this clinical tool, see instructions on our mobile apps guide.

I hope you will try Isabel and consider completing the online survey (at the red arrow) that is linked from the Isabel pages to ask for your feedback about this resource.

As always, do contact us if you have any questions about the above resources or anything else information-related.

 

 

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Enjoy these early and lasting gifts from the Bracken Health Sciences Library

By Suzanne Maranda, Head, Bracken Health Sciences Library

When I meet faculty in person, especially if I’ve not seen them in a while, or if they are new to Queen’s, they often embarrassedly admit that they never come to the library. Over the years, I’ve refined my answer: ”Oh, but you do; you probably just don’t know it. Most links to full-text articles would not work if the Library had not done the behind-the-scenes work.” Medical students are also quite amazed to find out, during their first session of medical school, that a single annual journal subscription can cost more than their tuition! The Queen’s Library spends over $9 million annually on library resources, most of which are electronic. The proportion in the health sciences is among the highest, with well over 90% of the purchases allocated to online materials.

The materials purchased by this library have also changed over time. It used to be that books and journals were the only information sources for serious learning and research. In recent years, in addition to conventional books and journals, with many more online than in print, you may find, among others, point-of-care tools such as Dynamed and BMJ Best Practice, anatomy software and image banks, clinical skills videos, clinical cases, and DVDs ( the latter can be borrowed to show in class or recommended to students).

While the Canadian dollar was still strong, the Library made strategic purchases of journal backfiles, allowing perpetual online access to older journal content. Most of this electronic content is linked to PubMed and Medline and the other databases in the OVIDSP interface for seamless access to full-text.

Tip #1: After completing a database search, it is best to NOT use the “limit to full-text” option in OvidSP because that limit only retains the journals purchased via this interface provider or where it has an agreement with particular publishers. There are MANY more journals that we purchase from other vendors, but the links will display only after clicking on the “Get it at Queen’s” button.

Screen shot 2014-12-05 at 10.01.56 AMWe are also very pleased that the links to full-text have finally been implemented in PubMed! Tip #2: For the links to appear, you must link to PubMed from the Bracken Library homepage (look under Find Articles). When you click on a citation, you will see this link: Bracken pic 2

in the top right corner, sometimes in conjunction with the publisher’s link. The Queen’s links will let you know exactly what years of the journal were purchased and, if the desired article is unavailable in full-text, you will see a link to order it from our Interlibrary Loans (ILL) service.

This brings me to an important change that will go into effect early in January 2015. All health and life sciences faculty and students will be able to order interlibrary loans using RACER. This service allows you to place orders and keep track of them yourself, but more importantly, it is linked to a desktop delivery system. Requested articles will be delivered as a link embedded in an email message. Remember that the Library no longer charges for interlibrary loan requests. More information will be sent to all health sciences faculty in December.

Course Reserve: Another service has changed this fall: there are now other options to place items on Course Reserve. Faculty have always been able to request that books or print journal articles be placed on reserve for students to sign out. These items are to be highly used by the entire class, and the reserve function allows for very short loans, usually 3 hours, which ensures that the entire class can have access within a reasonable amount of time. This is still the only way to handle a complete print book, but what about a chapter? Or an electronic article? Many faculty now put links to course readings in MedTech Central, and maybe we can help:

Tip #3: Bracken Library staff can scan a book chapter or a journal article and send faculty a pdf file for upload to MEdTech Central. This also applies to existing online materials: a persistent link can be created, which insures that you are using a reliable link over time and that the item is accessible from off campus. Please send requests to bracken.circdesk@queensu.ca. Now is the time to plan for the Winter Term!

Lastly, I hope you are aware of our Facebook page and you can also follow us on Twitter. I promise, you won’t be inundated!

On behalf of the entire Bracken Library staff, please accept my best wishes for the holiday season and for a healthy and productive 2015.

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