The Meds 2019 Clinical Clerks hit the streets.

Here they come.

This week, the class of Meds 2019 begin their Clinical Clerkship. Although this is only the half-way point in their medical education, it is a highly significant milestone, marking transition from a program dominated by largely classroom based knowledge and skills acquisition, to “real life” learning in a variety of clinical placements and elective experiences. Last Friday, this occasion was marked by a White Coat Ceremony, conducted by Dr. Armita Rahmani.

 

Photo by Bernard Clark

 

To further mark the occasion, I reprise my Top Ten list of tips for Clerkship. In doing so, I recognize that these points are intended not only for the students themselves, but also for the faculty members who will be supervising and supporting them in their various clinical placements. It can sometimes be difficult to remember the challenges faced by our students entering the clinical environment for the first time. I would draw particular attention to points 9 and 10.

 

So, here goes, in no particular order…

  1. Show up, and show up on time. It all starts with dependability. Even the most brilliant among us are useless if absent or unreliable. On the other hand, there will always be a welcome for the honest, steady contributor. If you are late, apologize, and do not show up with the coffee or snack that you picked up on the way.

 

  1. Repeat after me: “I don’t know. Self-awareness is right up there with dependability. There will be things you don’t know. There will be things nobody knows. You will not get into trouble or lessen your reputation by admitting to a lack of knowledge or experience with a particular clinical situation or procedure. After all, you’re a medical student, you’re not supposed to know everything! You do need to know what you don’t know. You will have major problems if you compromise a patient’s care through your unwillingness to admit limitations.

 

  1. Make it your business to learn about things you didn’t know first time. In fact, become an expert in that issue and look for opportunities to apply your new knowledge. When you do, you’ll find it intoxicating, and will search out even more knowledge. Careers have been built on less. Regard every patient and fresh problem you encounter as your curriculum. Keep track. You’ll be amazed at what you’ll be learning, and how fast.

 

  1. Remember that no decision that’s made honestly and in the patient’s best interest can be wrong. Anything we recommend for our patients, even the simplest decision, test or therapeutic intervention must meet one of three (and only three) criteria – it must relieve symptoms, improve functional capacity or increase life expectancy. There is no other justification for any intervention. You can’t be wrong for trying honestly to achieve one of those goals.

 

  1. And yet, things can go wrong... Even the best and most obvious decision may not go the way we intend or hope for. When things do go wrong and patients suffer adverse outcomes, it must be openly acknowledged and understood to ensure everyone (including you) learns from that outcome and becomes a better provider. As a medical student, you will not be the responsible party, but are nonetheless in a position to learn. Don’t be afraid to engage such situations, and don’t hesitate to discuss your feelings and reactions with more experienced people.

 

  1. Ask questions. Not to impress or stand out, but because you really want to know, and are concerned about the impact on your patient. Ask respectfully, but don’t be afraid to challenge decisions. Good clinicians don’t mind being asked to explain what they’re doing. Really, they don’t.

 

  1. Get along. With everybody, not just those you think are important. Do this all the time. Everyone you encounter knows more about the practical aspects of health care delivery than you do. They all have something valuable to pass along if you’re attentive and receptive. I’m going to use a key word here: Humility. People can sense it and respond positively to it. The opposite is arrogance, which people can also sense but respond to quite differently.

 

  1. Eat, sleep, laugh. You’ll be busy, but not so busy that you won’t have opportunity to look after your own well-being. Use your down time wisely. Plan meals and recreation. Surround yourself with people who know you well and have the capacity to make you laugh. They will become increasingly precious to you. Talk to them.

 

  1. Be open to possibilities. If you think you’ve decided on career choice, don’t be shocked (or worse yet, disappointed) if something unexpected emerges. If you feel strongly conflicted, there’s probably a good reason. Talk it out with someone and remember it’s never really too late to change. If you can’t decide because everything seems great, that’s a good thing, but you might also need to talk it out. We’re available.

 

  1. And finally… look after each other. You know each other very well, and will know when someone is having difficulties, likely before they know it themselves. Don’t be afraid to reach out, or to seek advice or help. Our Student Affairs staff, headed by Dr. Fitzpatrick, and myself are all available to you or your colleague, as well as Beck Haist, Student Counselor. Remember QMed Help, the red button available on MedTech.

 

So there you have my list. Happy to receive revisions, additions or comments from readers. Final word to our students – enjoy. Clerkship is a time to grow and learn.

 

Anthony J. Sanfilippo, MD, FRCP(C)

Associate Dean,

Undergraduate Medical Education

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6th annual Medical Student Research Showcase

By Drs. Heather Murray & Melanie Walker

This year the School of Medicine is proud to invite you to the 6th annual Medical Student Research Showcase on Wednesday September 20th.

This event celebrates the research achievements of our undergraduate medical students, with both posters and an oral plenary session featuring research performed by students while they have been enrolled in medical school. All students who received summer studentship research funding through the School of Medicine in 2017 will be presenting their work, as well as many other research initiatives. The posters will be displayed in the David Walker atrium of the School of Medicine building from 8am until 5pm, with the students standing at their posters answering questions between 10:30 and noon.

The oral plenary features the top research projects selected by a panel of faculty judges, and will run in room 132A from noon until 1:30pm on September 20th, immediately following the poster session Q&A.

This year’s faculty judges included:

Dr. Yuka Asai

Dr. Jennifer Flemming

Dr. Katrina Gee

Dr. David Good

Dr. Dianne Groll

Dr. Paula James

Dr. Robert Reid

Dr. Prameet Sheth

Dr. Graeme Smith

Dr. Tan Towheed

Dr. Andrea Winthrop

We are very grateful to these faculty members for evaluating our oral plenary applicants this year.

The three students who have been selected for the oral plenary session, and the titles of their research presentations and faculty supervisor names are listed below. Each of these three students will receive The Albert Clark Award for Medical Student Research Excellence.

Gregory Hawley – Plasminogen depletion following severe burn injury

Jeffrey Mah – Survival following Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS) in Patients with Cirrhosis: A Population-based Study

Sean Tom – ETS1 transcription factor-mediated upregulation of microRNA-31 controls cardiac fibrogenesis in human atrial fibrillation.

Please set aside some time to attend the Medical Student Research Showcase on September 20th. The students will appreciate your interest and support, and you will be amazed at what they have been able to achieve.

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Names matter

What’s in a name? That which we call a rose

By any other name would smell as sweet.

 So mused the ill-fated heroine in Romeo and Juliet, about her equally ill-fated love.

In medicine and in teaching, however, names can mean a lot.

The late Dr. Kate Granger of the United Kingdom was one of the strongest advocates for using names with her #hellomynameis campaign – launched while she lived with terminal cancer. As explained in a BBC article following her death in July 2016, the campaign “encouraged healthcare staff to introduce themselves to patients.”

“A by-product of her own experiences of hospital in August 2013, it grew out of the feelings of unimportance she experienced when the doctor who informed her that her cancer had spread did not introduce himself,” the BBC wrote. Granger had explained it this way: “It’s the first thing you are taught in medical school, that when you approach a patient you say your name, your role and what you are going to do. This missing link made me feel like I did not really matter, that these people weren’t bothered who I was. I ended up at times feeling like I was just a diseased body in a hospital bed.”

Learning and using names is important for both teachers and students, long before they reach patients’ hospital beds. For this reason, we emphasize the importance of names in our UGME classrooms and clinical skills environments, too.

“Learning students’ names signals your interest in their performance and encourages student motivation and class participation,” writes Barbara Gross Davis in Tools for Teaching. “Even if you can’t learn everyone’s name, students appreciate your making the effort.”

One of the strategies of learning students names that Gross Davis (and others) suggests is one we’ve adopted at Queen’s UG: having students use name tent cards in the classrooms. This was adopted for two reasons, Dr. Lindsay Davidson, Director of Teaching, Learning, and Integration explains.

“It’s because we start developing professional identity from Day 1, and being a doctor means introducing who you are.”

“And because it helps build relationships,” she adds. “Student-student but also teacher-student—teachers can respond to students as individuals with names not ‘the guy in the ball cap’.”

“We expect all medical students to wear identification nametags for all clinical skills sessions, both in-house and when at health facilities,” says Clinical Skills Director Dr. Cherie Jones. She notes that the Year 1 students don’t have these on Day 1 as these are provided by KGH. “We use paper ones until they are done!” Once the official badges are available, they must be worn.

And it’s not just for students: clinical skills tutors are expected to wear their ID that they use in their clinical settings.

And for all those (like me) who’ve become accustomed to wearing an ID card on a lanyard or on a hip-level clip: IDs are to be worn on the lapel of the jacket—where they can best be seen

“Name tags are important in clinical skills sessions because the Standardized Patients (SPs) and Volunteer Patients (VPs), like to know the names of the students and tutors they are working with and don’t always understand or hear the name when the student introduces themselves,” Dr. Jones explains.

The Clinical Skills policy mimics the name-badge policies at the hospitals in Kingston. “Name tags in clinical settings like KGH are mandatory for anyone interacting with patients, staff, even with visitors,” Dr. Jones points out.

“Not only is it policy in the hospital, but patients like being able to read anyone’s name – not just the students’,” adds Kathy Bowes, Clinical Skills Coordinator.

So, remember your ID badge, use your name tent cards in the classrooms, use people’s names. And me, I’ll be pinning my hospital ID badge in the right place the next time I’m heading over to KGH for a meeting.

Because names matter. To everyone.

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Welcoming Queen’s Meds 2021

The academic cycle is such that, for a few short weeks each summer, our student population reduces by a quarter. Last May, we graduated and congratulated the class of Meds 2017, who have now gone on to engage the next phase their careers. This week, our school continues its cycle of annual renewal, welcoming another eager and very promising group of aspiring physicians, the class of Meds 2021.

 

Picture by Lars Hagberg of incoming med students for Queen’s School of Medicine.

 

A few facts about our new colleagues:

They were selected from a pool of 4752 highly qualified students who submitted applications last fall.

Their average age is 23 with a range of 19 to 34 years.  Fifty-eight percent are women. They hail from no fewer than 39 communities across Canada, including; Ajax, Aurora, Bancroft, Brampton, Brantford, Burnaby, Calgary, Deseronto, Dunnville, Edmonton, Etobicoke, Guelph, Hamilton, Kelowna, Kingston, Maple, Markham, Milton, Mississauga, North Bay, North Saanich, North Vancouver, North York, Oakville, Orillia, Orleans, Oshawa, Ottawa, Peterborough, Pickering, Pointe Aux Roches, Richmond Hill, Scarborough, Severn, Surrey, Thornhill, Toronto, Vancouver and Vaughn.

Eighty-four of our new students have completed an Undergraduate degree, and twenty-nine have postgraduate degrees, including seven PhDs. The universities they have attended and degree programs are listed below:

Universities of Undergraduate Studies

Carleton University
McGill University
McMaster University
Novosilbirsk State University
Queen’s University
Ryerson University
Simon Fraser University
Trent University
Trinity Western
University of British Columbia
University of Calgary
University of Cambridge
University of Guelph
University of Ottawa
University of Toronto
University of Waterloo
Vassar College
Western University
York University

 

Undergraduate Degree Majors

Biochemistry
Biology
Biomedical Science
Business Administration
Chemical Biology
Chemical Engineering
Cognitive Science
Electrical Engineering
English
French Studies
Gender Studies
Global Development
Health Science
Integrated Science
Kinesiology
Life Science
Medical Science
Neuroscience
Nursing
Physiology
Psychology

 

An academically diverse and very qualified group, to be sure.  Last week, they undertook a variety of orientation activities organized by both faculty and their upper year colleagues.

On their first day, they were called upon to demonstrate commitment to their studies, their profession and their future patients.  They were assured that they will have a voice within our school and be treated with the same respect they are expected to provide each other, their faculty and all patients and volunteers they encounter through their medical school careers.  At that first session, they were welcomed by Dean Reznick who challenged them to be restless in the pursuit of their goals and the betterment of our society and shared with them a message from his favourite poet and recent Nobel Laueate Bob Dylan. Mr. Cale Templeton, Asesculapian Society President, welcomed them on behalf of their upper year colleagues, and Dr. Rachel Rooney provided them an introduction to fundamental concepts of medical professionalism.

Over the course of the week, they met curricular leaders who will particularly involved in their first year, including Dr. Michelle Gibson (Year 1 Director) and Dr. Cherie Jones (Clinical Skills Director). They were also introduced to Dr. Renee Fitzpatrick (Director of Student Affairs) and our excellent learner support team, including Drs. Martin Ten Hove, Jason Franklin, Kelly Howse, Susan Haley, Josh Lakoff, Craig Goldie and Erin Beattie, who oriented them to the Learner Wellness, Career Counseling and Academic Support services that will be provided throughout their years with us. They met members of our superb administrative and educational support teams led by Jacqueline Findlay, Jennifer Saunders, Sheila Pinchin, Amanda Consack, and first year Curricular Coordinator Corinne Bochsma.

Dr. Susan Moffatt organized and coordinated the very popular and much appreciated “Pearls of Wisdom” session, where fourth year students nominate and introduce faculty members who have been particularly impactful in their education, and invite them to pass on a few words of advice to the new students. This year, Drs. Erin Beattie, Bob Connelly, Filip Gilic, Robyn Houlden, Vickie Martin, Alex Menard, Laura Milne, Heather Murray, Cliff Rice and Ruth Wilson were selected for this honour.

On Friday, the practical aspects of curriculum, expectations of conduct and promotions were explained by Drs. Michelle Gibson.

Their Meds 2020 upper year colleagues welcomed them with a number of formal and not-so-formal events. These included sessions intended to promote an inclusive learning environment, as well as orientations to Queen’s and Kingston, introductions to the mentorship program, and a variety of evening social events which, judging by appearances the next morning, were much enjoyed.

For all these arrangements, flawlessly coordinated, I’m very grateful to Rebecca Jozsa, our Admissions Officer.

I invite you to join me in welcoming these new members of our school and medical community.

 

Anthony J. Sanfilippo, MD, FRCP(C)

Associate Dean,

Undergraduate Medical Education

Posted on

Welcoming Queen’s Meds 2021

The academic cycle is such that, for a few short weeks each summer, our student population reduces by a quarter. Last May, we graduated and congratulated the class of Meds 2017, who have now gone on to engage the next phase their careers. This week, our school continues its cycle of annual renewal, welcoming another eager and very promising group of aspiring physicians, the class of Meds 2021.

 

Picture by Lars Hagberg of incoming med students for Queen’s School of Medicine.

 

A few facts about our new colleagues:

They were selected from a pool of 4752 highly qualified students who submitted applications last fall.

Their average age is 23 with a range of 19 to 34 years.  Fifty-eight percent are women. They hail from no fewer than 39 communities across Canada, including; Ajax, Aurora, Bancroft, Brampton, Brantford, Burnaby, Calgary, Deseronto, Dunnville, Edmonton, Etobicoke, Guelph, Hamilton, Kelowna, Kingston, Maple, Markham, Milton, Mississauga, North Bay, North Saanich, North Vancouver, North York, Oakville, Orillia, Orleans, Oshawa, Ottawa, Peterborough, Pickering, Pointe Aux Roches, Richmond Hill, Scarborough, Severn, Surrey, Thornhill, Toronto, Vancouver and Vaughn.

Eighty-four of our new students have completed an Undergraduate degree, and twenty-nine have postgraduate degrees, including seven PhDs. The universities they have attended and degree programs are listed below:

Universities of Undergraduate Studies

Carleton University
McGill University
McMaster University
Novosilbirsk State University
Queen’s University
Ryerson University
Simon Fraser University
Trent University
Trinity Western
University of British Columbia
University of Calgary
University of Cambridge
University of Guelph
University of Ottawa
University of Toronto
University of Waterloo
Vassar College
Western University
York University

 

Undergraduate Degree Majors

Biochemistry
Biology
Biomedical Science
Business Administration
Chemical Biology
Chemical Engineering
Cognitive Science
Electrical Engineering
English
French Studies
Gender Studies
Global Development
Health Science
Integrated Science
Kinesiology
Life Science
Medical Science
Neuroscience
Nursing
Physiology
Psychology

 

An academically diverse and very qualified group, to be sure.  Last week, they undertook a variety of orientation activities organized by both faculty and their upper year colleagues.

On their first day, they were called upon to demonstrate commitment to their studies, their profession and their future patients.  They were assured that they will have a voice within our school and be treated with the same respect they are expected to provide each other, their faculty and all patients and volunteers they encounter through their medical school careers.  At that first session, they were welcomed by Dean Reznick who challenged them to be restless in the pursuit of their goals and the betterment of our society and shared with them a message from his favourite poet and recent Nobel Laueate Bob Dylan. Mr. Cale Templeton, Asesculapian Society President, welcomed them on behalf of their upper year colleagues, and Dr. Rachel Rooney provided them an introduction to fundamental concepts of medical professionalism.

Over the course of the week, they met curricular leaders who will particularly involved in their first year, including Dr. Michelle Gibson (Year 1 Director) and Dr. Cherie Jones (Clinical Skills Director). They were also introduced to Dr. Renee Fitzpatrick (Director of Student Affairs) and our excellent learner support team, including Drs. Martin Ten Hove, Jason Franklin, Kelly Howse, Susan Haley, Josh Lakoff, Craig Goldie and Erin Beattie, who oriented them to the Learner Wellness, Career Counseling and Academic Support services that will be provided throughout their years with us. They met members of our superb administrative and educational support teams led by Jacqueline Findlay, Jennifer Saunders, Sheila Pinchin, Amanda Consack, and first year Curricular Coordinator Corinne Bochsma.

Dr. Susan Moffatt organized and coordinated the very popular and much appreciated “Pearls of Wisdom” session, where fourth year students nominate and introduce faculty members who have been particularly impactful in their education, and invite them to pass on a few words of advice to the new students. This year, Drs. Erin Beattie, Bob Connelly, Filip Gilic, Robyn Houlden, Vickie Martin, Alex Menard, Laura Milne, Heather Murray, Cliff Rice and Ruth Wilson were selected for this honour.

On Friday, the practical aspects of curriculum, expectations of conduct and promotions were explained by Drs. Michelle Gibson.

Their Meds 2020 upper year colleagues welcomed them with a number of formal and not-so-formal events. These included sessions intended to promote an inclusive learning environment, as well as orientations to Queen’s and Kingston, introductions to the mentorship program, and a variety of evening social events which, judging by appearances the next morning, were much enjoyed.

For all these arrangements, flawlessly coordinated, I’m very grateful to Rebecca Jozsa, our Admissions Officer.

I invite you to join me in welcoming these new members of our school and medical community.

 

Anthony J. Sanfilippo, MD, FRCP(C)

Associate Dean,

Undergraduate Medical Education

Posted on