Interprofessional observerships provide insight

By Dr. Lindsay Davidson, Collaborator Lead

 

For several years, first year medical students have had the opportunity to shadow a non-physician health care provider for a half day as part of the Introduction to Professional Roles course. This initiative, championed by Dr. Sanfilippo, initially involved nurses at one institution and has grown to include 3 sites (KGH, HDH and PCCC) and 11 different groups of health care providers. First year students are charged with beginning to understand their role (as future physicians) as well as the role(s) of the myriad types of health care providers that they will work with over the course of their careers. Most years, the Observerships have been preceded by an in-class brainstorming session, where student infer what various professionals’ roles might be. Following this, students are assigned to work with one of the available health care providers during curricular time. This practical experience allows students to act as ‘anthropologists’, observing for themselves what various health care providers actually do, day-to-day as well as how they collaborate with patients, family members and other members of their team. Finally, at the end of term, students convene in groups to compare and debrief their experiences, collating new lists of the roles and functions that they have observer, to be contrasted with their initial brainstorming. Invariably, the end-of-term collations reflect the insight of the experiences that they have shared.

Here are some of the observations students have made:

“I liked being able to be a part of the meetings with families so that I could better understand what role the social worker played.”

“My preceptor was very approachable and forthcoming with information about her profession; she seemed very enthusiastic about participating in the IP program.”

“… I just had not thought about how the social worker-patient encounter would rely on the same trust- and rapport-building methods as the physician physicians do.”

“I had pictured a dietitian’s work to be office-based, with patients coming for consults at her desk. It never occurred to me that in the hospital, they would accompany the rest of the health teams to do rounds.”

“And I now appreciate the importance of an OT in helping a patient adapt to their new health and return to their normal life as best as possible.”

“I had envisioned a solemn chaplain giving last rites, but clearly this is not the role of the spiritual care practitioner at KGH. Instead, I was surprised by the breadth of the role – there are people who do not consider themselves spiritual or religious at all, yet still speak at length with the spiritual care practitioner about their life and their thoughts about death.”

“I believe it is important to be aware of how physicians can collaborate with allied health professionals to provide the best care, recognizing that we cannot do everything.”

The Interprofessional (IP) Observership has been met with enthusiasm by students and our hospital partners alike and this year, we are offering students the opportunity to participate in an optional second observership, to broaden their experience an understanding of their future IP colleagues. Additionally, in 2017-18, we will be piloting an advanced IP Observership at the Kingston Community Health Centre, where groups of students will spend half a day observing a team-based Interprofessional clinic in our community.


With thanks to students Sarah Edgerley,  Shannon Willmott, Ameir Makar, and Etienne Benard-Seguin who have been working on tracking and analyzing the Interprofessional Observership experience.

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Curriculum Committee Meeting Information – January 26, 2017

Faculty and staff interested in attending Curriculum Committee meetings should contact the Committee Secretary, Candace Miller at candace.miller@queensu.ca for information relating to agenda items and meeting schedules.

A meeting of the Curriculum Committee was held on January 26, 2017.  To review the topics discussed at this meeting, please click HERE to view the agenda.

Faculty interested in reviewing the minutes of this meeting can click HERE to be taken to the Curriculum Committee’s page located on the Faculty Resources Community of MEdTech Central.

Those who are directly impacted by any decisions made by the Curriculum Committee have been notified via email.

Students interested in the outcome of a decision or discussion are welcome to contact the Aesculapian Society’s Vice President, Academic, Kate Rath-Wilson, at vpacademic@qmed.ca.

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Residency Match Day 2017: What our students are experiencing, and how to help them get through it

 

“When you come to a fork in the road, take it.” Yogi Berra

 

Mr. Berra definitely had a knack for the deceptively profound. This is one of my favourite “Yogi-isms”. He reminds us, in his inimitable style, that making and committing to a decision can be difficult but essential if we are to progress. In contrast, indecision, can be both paralyzing and damaging to long-term success.

His words particularly come to mind this time of year when our senior students face what might be termed a “life altering event”.

We’re all familiar with that concept. These are moments when the course of our lives pivots on a single event or decision. Many of these are unexpected and their impact only appreciated retrospectively. However, when they’re known and anticipated, they’re understandably accompanied by much emotion – excitement, speculation, and trepidation.

For medical students in Canada, “Match Day” is one of those events. For those of you not familiar, Match Day is when all fourth year students learn which postgraduate program they will be entering. The match is the final step in a long process of contemplation, exploration and application. The match and the day itself are full of drama, with all results being released simultaneously at noon.

This year, Match Day is March 1. By approximately 12:00:05 that day, all students will know their fate. As you can imagine, there will be much anxiety leading up to the release. For most (hopefully all), the day will be one of relief and celebration. For a very few (and hopefully none), there may be disappointment and confusion. Many schools release their fourth year clinical clerks from clinical duties on Match Day. At Queen’s we have taken the position that our students take on professional obligations during their training and their personal celebrations should not supervene those obligations. Having said that, I’d like to remind any faculty supervising our fourth year students on March 1st of the following:

  1. Anticipate that your student will be distracted that morning
  2. Please ensure your student is able to review their results at noon.
  3. Check on your student. If he or she is disappointed, please be advised that the student counselors and myself are standing by that day to help any student deal with their situation and develop a plan.
  4. Be advised that the students will almost certainly be holding some type of celebratory event that evening. Although your students are not excused for personal purposes, I would ask that you give them every reasonable consideration.

 

Fortunately, we have an excellent Student Affairs team, headed by Dr. Renee Fitzpatrick, who is available and very willing to answer any questions you may have and respond to concerns regarding our students. The team can be accessed through our Student Affairs office learnerwellness@queensu.ca, or 613-533-6000 x78451. The faculty counselors can also be contacted directly at the following:

 

Dr. Renee Fitzpatrick

Director, Student Affairs

fitzpatr@hdh.kari.net

 

 

 

 

Dr. Kelly Howse

Career Advisor

kelly.howse@dfm.queensu.ca

 

 

 

 

Dr. Susan Haley

Career Advisor
haleys@kgh.kari.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Josh Lakoff

Career Advisor

lakoffjo@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

Thanks for your consideration, and please feel free to get in touch with myself or any of the Student Affairs Team if you have questions or concerns about Match Day or beyond.

 

 

 

Anthony J. Sanfilippo, MD, FRCP(C)

Associate Dean, Undergraduate Medical Education

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It’s who we are.

Can a nation be characterized? Is it possible, or at all reasonable, to ascribe traits and qualities to an entire people, as one would for individuals? Until recently, I thought the answer to that question was clearly “no”, and that attempts to do so were rather narrow-minded, fodder for advertisers and late night television hosts, but not worthy of serious consideration. A collective of millions, or hundreds of millions, one would think, is far too complex and multi-faceted to be understood with a few adjectives and pithy phrases.

Two events, recently very much in the news, have changed my perspective, at least with regard to the Canadian national identity.

The horrific murders of six men while at prayer in a Quebec City mosque have shaken our nation. Although we’re all too familiar with such tragic events around the world, we’re never truly prepared for such an occurrence so close to home.

It’s said for individuals that true character emerges in times of adversity. If so, this was surely a test for the Canadian national character. How would we, and our press, respond? Would current world tensions and the attitudes of the newly elected American president influence reporting or mute our response?

What did we see?

We saw the six victims described not primarily as members of a particular religious or ethnic group, but as fathers, husbands, friends, members and strong contributors to their communities.

We learned from CBC, our national broadcaster, (http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/quebec-city-mosque-shooting-victims-1.3958191) that Azzeddine Soufiane was a 57 year-old father of three who worked as a grocer and butcher. He was a longtime Quebec City resident who often volunteered to orient newcomers to the city.

We learned that Khaled Belkacemi was a 60 year-old professor of agricultural engineering at Laval University, who earned his PhD at Sherbrooke. He was described by one of his colleagues as “a kind person, someone appreciated by everyone… a renowned scientist who was very well known…an enormous loss.”

Aboubaker Thabti was a 44 year-old father of two young children who worked in a local pharmacy. Friends said “he’s so kind: everyone loves him – everyone.”

Mamadou Tanou, 42, and Ibrahima Barry, 39, were friends originally from Guinea. Tanou, who worked in Information Technology, had two young children, aged 3 and 1. Barry worked in the Quebec Revenue Ministry and was the father of four, all under the age of 14.

Abdelkrim Hassane, 41, worked as a programming analyst for the Quebec government and had three daughters aged 10, 8 and 15 months.

Our collective choice, expressed through a press well attuned to the sensibility of its readers and ethos of the nation, was not to stoke discord and controversy, but to regard the victims with compassion and sensitivity. They chose inclusion.

We saw the leaders of our three major political parties express, jointly, our collective grief and sentiments in terms that reflect a society truly accepting of diversity, with nothing overtly political or varnished in their words or actions. They proved themselves to be decent people and dedicated leaders who were able to give expression to the Canadian character, because they truly understood and believed in it.

We saw a French Canadian Premier of Quebec engage the events and those affected not as a marginalized “minority” within his province, but as fully accepted members.

We saw people of all religious backgrounds express support and unity in any way they could imagine, from writing letters of support, to marching, rallying around their local communities, or attending memorial services. We saw $80,000 raised within 17 hours for the support of families of the victims.

We saw a common rallying cry against religious intolerance and terrorism of any kind. We did not see demonstrations in the street by minorities who felt themselves victimized.

At the same time, we are confronted with the American travel advisory prohibiting access to people on the basis of their nationality. Various stories emerge about terrible consequences of this decision. Again, adversity reveals character. This past week, our provincial Minister of Health invited one of our teaching hospitals to take on the care of children scheduled for life-saving surgery in American hospitals but now unable to enter the country.

Not only is this the right thing to do, but a decision entirely in keeping with Canadian values, and one that would get approval of virtually every Canadian, regardless of political or religious affiliation

 

We live in a troubled world, during troubling times, but can take pride in being part of a nation that has deeply held and noble values.

The world, now more than ever, needs Canada to stay true to those values.

 

Anthony J. Sanfilippo, MD, FRCP(C)

Associate Dean,

Undergraduate Medical Education

 

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Decoding Learning Event Types

Tucked on the right-hand side of every Learning Event Page on MEdTech are notations about the date & time and location of the class, followed by the length of the session and then the “Breakdown” of how the time will be spent. In other words: the learning event type.

We use 14 learning event types* in the UGME program. The identification of a learning event type indicates the type of teaching and learning experience to be expected at that session.

Broadly speaking, our learning event types can be divided into two categories: Content Delivery and Content Application.

For content delivery, students are presented with core knowledge and/or skills with specific direction and/or commentary from an expert teacher. Content delivery learning events include:

  • Directed Independent Learning (DIL) — these are independent learning sessions which are assigned curricular time. Typically students are expected to spend up to double the assigned time to complete the tasks – i.e. some of the work may occur in “homework time”. DIL’s have a specific structure and must include:
    • Specific learning objectives
    • A resource or set of resources chosen by the teacher
    • Teacher guidance indicating the task or particular focus that is required of students. This may be a formal assignment, informal worksheet or study guide.
    • The session must link to a subsequent content application session
    • Formative testing in the form of MCQ or reflective questions are an optional component of DILs
  • Lecture – Whole class session which is largely teacher-directed. We encourage the use of case illustrations during lectures, however these alone do not fulfil the criteria for content application or active learning.
  • Demonstration – Session where a skill or technique is demonstrated to students.

For content application (sometimes described as “active learning”), students work in teams or individually to use and clarify previously-acquired knowledge, usually while working through case-based problems. These learning event types include:

  • Small group learning (SGL): Students work in teams to solve case-base problems which are revealed progressively. Simultaneous reporting and facilitated inter-team discussion is a key component of this learning strategy which is modeled on Team-based learning. SGL cases may be preceded by in class readiness assessment testing (RAT) done individually and then as a team. This serves to debrief the preparation and provide for individual accountability for preparation.
  • Facilitated small group learning (FSGL)Students work in teams and with a faculty tutor to solve case-base problems which are revealed progressively. While there is structure to FSGL cases, students are encouraged to seek out and share knowledge based on individual research.
  • Simulation: Session where students participate in a simulated procedure or clinical encounter.
  • Case-based Instruction (CBI): Session where students interact with guest patients and/or health care providers who share their experience. Builds on prior learning and often includes interactive Q+A component.
  • Laboratory: Hands-on or simulated exercises in which learners collect or use data to test and/or verify hypotheses or to address questions about principles and/or phenomena, such as Anatomy Labs.

The other learning event types we use don’t fit as neatly into the content delivery/content application algorithm. These include:

  • Clerkship seminar – instruction provided to a learner or small group of learners by direct interaction with an instructor. Depending on design, clerkship seminars may be either content delivery or content application.
  • Self-Directed Learning (SDL) is scheduled time set aside for students to take the initiative for their own learning. A minimum of eight hours per week (pro-rated in short weeks) is designated SDL time.
  • Peer Teaching is learner-to-learner instruction for the mutual learning experience of both “teacher” and “learner” which includes active learning components. This includes sessions that require students to work together in small groups without a teaching, such as Being a Medical Student (BAMS) sessions, the Community Based Project and some Critical Enquiry sessions.
  • Career Counseling sessions, which provide guidance, direction and support; these may be in groups or one-on-one.

Two other notations you’ll see are “Other-curricular” and “Other—non-curricular”. Other—curricular is used for sessions that are directly linked to a course but that are not included in calculations of instructional methods. This includes things like examinations, post-exam reviews, and orientation sessions. Other—non-curricular are sessions of an administrative nature that are not directly linked to a particular course and are outside of curricular time, for example, class town hall meetings and optional events or conferences.

Incorporating a variety of learning event types in each course is important to ensure a balance of knowledge acquisition and application. Course plans are set by course directors with their year director, in consultation with the course teachers and with support from the UG Education Team and the Teaching, Learning, and Integration Committee (TLIC).


— With contributions from Lindsay Davidson, Director of Teaching, Learning, and Integration

*In 2015, Queen’s UGME adopted the MedBiquitous learning event naming conventions to ease sharing of data amongst institutions. For this reason, some  learning event type categories may be different from ones used here prior to 2015, or ones used at other, non-medical schools or medical schools which have not adopted these conventions.

 

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Curriculum Committee Meeting Information – November 24, 2016 & December 15, 2016

Faculty and staff interested in attending Curriculum Committee meetings should contact the Committee Secretary, Candace Miller, at candace.miller@queensu.ca for information relating to agenda items and meeting schedules.

A meeting of the Curriculum Committee was held on November 24, 2016 and on December 15, 2016.  To review the topics discussed at these meeting, please click HERE to view the November meeting agenda and HERE to view the December meeting agenda.

Faculty interested in reviewing the minutes of this meeting can click HERE to be taken to the Curriculum Committee’s page located on the Faculty Resources Community of MEdTech Central.

Those who are directly impacted by any decisions made by the Curriculum Committee have been notified via email.

Students interested in the outcome of a decision or discussion are welcome to contact the Aesculapian Society’s Vice President, Academic, Kate Rath-Wilson, at vpacademic@qmed.ca.

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Curriculum Committee Meeting Information – November 24, 2016 & December 15, 2016

Faculty and staff interested in attending Curriculum Committee meetings should contact the Committee Secretary, Candace Miller, at candace.miller@queensu.ca for information relating to agenda items and meeting schedules.

A meeting of the Curriculum Committee was held on November 24, 2016 and on December 15, 2016.  To review the topics discussed at these meeting, please click HERE to view the November meeting agenda and HERE to view the December meeting agenda.

Faculty interested in reviewing the minutes of this meeting can click HERE to be taken to the Curriculum Committee’s page located on the Faculty Resources Community of MEdTech Central.

Those who are directly impacted by any decisions made by the Curriculum Committee have been notified via email.

Students interested in the outcome of a decision or discussion are welcome to contact the Aesculapian Society’s Vice President, Academic, Kate Rath-Wilson, at vpacademic@qmed.ca.

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