The Annual Faculty of Health Sciences Celebration of Teaching was held June 12 to celebrate innovative efforts of teaching, learning and scholarship in the faculty, sponsored by the Office of Health Sciences Education.

This year’s theme was Connecting Curricular Innovations to Health Sciences Competencies. The conference featured an opening panel, a facilitated poster session, a dozen “swap shops” and a keynote speaker to wrap up the day-long event.

The opening panel explored competency frameworks across health sciences disciplines. The panel featured Kathleen Norman (Physical Therapy); Catherine Donnelly (Occupational Therapy); Rosemary Brander (Interprofessional Education and Practice); Cheryl Pulling (Nursing) and moderator Damon Dagnone (Medicine).

The facilitated poster session featured 25 posters in five categories. Posters presented research and other projects by faculty, students and staff members.

Key-note Speaker  Damon Dagnone
Key-note Speaker
Damon Dagnone

For the half-hour swap-shops, presenters discussed a curricular innovation and led a discussion with participants about challenges and successes they had experienced. Topics ranged from how to give, receive and respond to feedback, to using YouTube in your teaching; from structured interprofessional observerships to engaging undergraduate students in research. Participants could attend up to three swap-shop sessions.

The keynote presentation was delivered by J. Damon Dagnone, Faculty Lead for Competency Based Medical Education (CBME) for Postgraduate Medical Education. Dr. Dagnone is also an assistant professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine.

In his presentation, Dr. Dagnone invited attendees to consider three questions:

  • How do we extract competency from our everyday healthcare environments?
  • How are current practices of CBE implementation (un)realistic?
  • How should assessment help drive the agenda?

Dr. Dagnone’s presentation acknowledged both the challenges presented and the necessity for embracing competency-based frameworks and challenging time-based-only paradigms.