Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation



Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, also known as Physiatry, is the branch of medicine concerned with the comprehensive diagnosis, medical management and rehabilitation of people of all ages with neuromusculoskeletal disorders and associated disabilities.  Physiatrists work in a diverse range of subspecialty areas to help patients with a variety of impairments related to conditions such as stroke acquired brain injuries, spinal cord injuries, amputation, and various musculoskeletal disorders.  Physiatrists play a vital role in our health care system and as the Canadian population continues to age, the demand for their services will only continue to grow.

Dr. Ruth Wilson named to the Order of Canada

Published Thu Jul 02/15 11:00am.

Ruth Wilson, a professor in the Department of Family Medicine at Queen’s, was named today as a Member of the Order of Canada by His Excellency the Right Honourable David Johnston (Law’66), Governor General of Canada, for her contributions to improving primary care in Ontario and for her leadership in family medicine.

Dr. Wilson follows in the footsteps of her mother Lois Wilson, a Companion of the Order of Canada, the first female moderator of the United Church of Canada and former member of the Canadian Senate.

“I am very honoured to be receiving the Order of Canada,” says Dr. Wilson. “I love the motto of the Order of Canada: ‘They desire a better country.’ I do the work that I do because of my desire for a better country. This award is also significant because it extends beyond the world of medicine.”


A leader in the Canadian medical field, Dr. Wilson joined the Queen’s in 1989 and served as Department of Family Medicine head from 1991 to 2001. She is currently vice-president of medical and academic programs for Providence Care, where her leadership has advanced the organization’s reputation as a leading provider of integrated services in the areas of mental health, aging and rehabilitative care.

“The Order of Canada recognizes outstanding achievement and dedication to the community and to Canada,” says Principal Daniel Woolf. “As a leader in the field of health care, Dr. Wilson is deserving of this award for the enrichment she has brought to the lives of others which extends to the Queen’s community and our students.”

In addition to her research work, Dr. Wilson is a family physician with the Queen’s Family Health Team. She also has more than a decade of experience practicing family medicine in remote areas of Canada. From 2001-2004, she served as chair of the Ontario Family Health Network, which was responsible for implementing primary care reform in the province. She has also contributed internationally to the development of primary health-care systems in areas of need.

“What I love about my work is I’m able to bridge the continuum between caring for patients, leading change in the medical system in Canada, developing policy, and teaching the next generation,” says Dr. Wilson. “I’m a generalist. I want to join policy, patients and learners.”

In 2013, Dr. Wilson was elected president of the North American region of the World Organization of National Colleges, Academies and Academic Associations of General Practitioners/Family Physicians (WONCA), which works to foster high standards of care in family medicine globally.  In 2010, WONCA awarded Dr. Wilson a Five Star Doctor Award, one of two triennial awards for excellence in health care, citing her excellence as a care provider, a decision maker, a communicator, a community leader and a team member.

Also in 2010, Canada’s Women’s Executive Network named her one of the country’s Top 100 Most Powerful Women.

“Dr. Wilson is highly respected within her community, her department, throughout the Faculty of Health Sciences and, indeed, throughout the university,” says Glenn Brown, Head, Department of Family Medicine. “She has provided leadership in many important and sensitive areas, always demonstrating deep knowledge, respect and sound judgement.”

For more information about the Order of Canada, visit the Governor General’s website.

by Anne Craig, Communications Officer

Become a Patient Safety Trainer

Published Wed Jun 24/15 9:00am.
The Master of Science in Healthcare Quality program, Queen’s University, along with The Canadian Patient Safety Institute, are excited to offer the “Become a Patient Safety Trainer” conference to clinical teams from Canadian healthcare organizations and to members of healthcare faculty.

With an emphasis on creativity and excellence in educational techniques, the PSEP – Canada conference is delivered by well-respected quality and patient safety healthcare professionals and educators from across Canada and focuses on:
  • How to teach and implement patient safety
  • Scientific methods for improving safety
  • Organizational culture and dealing with change
  • Understanding teamwork
  • Moving beyond blame to systems thinking
  • Applying human factors in the workplace
At the end of the conference, participants will leave as certified PSEP – Canada trainers. Trainers will be equipped with a comprehensive patient safety curriculum which can be easily embedded to your organization’s current education, patient safety and quality practices.  For more information visit:  Patientsafetyinstitute.ca

After the Last Breath

Published Mon Jun 22/15 2:00pm.
Presented by: Dorothy Trimble-Hayes

0800-0900
Friday June 26, 2015
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. The role and services of funeral homes/crematoriums
2. The process of receiving the deceased
3. Challenging situations in the home

Flyer attached here.

Medical Marijuana Today: A Focus on Palliative Care

Published Mon Jun 15/15 11:00am.
Presented by: Dr. Saneea Abboud

0800-0900 
Friday June 19, 2015
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. Be introduced to the different cannabis/cannabinoid products
2. Review current recommendation for cannabis/cannabinoid use for common symptoms in palliative care 
3. Become familiar with Health Canada’s current medical marijuana legislation

Flyer attached here
Presentation slides attached here.  

Medical Marijuana Today: A Focus on Palliative Care

Published Mon Jun 15/15 10:45am.
Presented by: Dr. Saneea Abboud

0800-0900 
Friday June 19, 2015
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. Be introduced to the different cannabis/cannabinoid products
2. Review current recommendation for cannabis/cannabinoid use for common symptoms in palliative care 
3. Become familiar with Health Canada’s current medical marijuana legislation

Flyer attached here
Sign-in sheet attached here
Evaluation Form attached here.
Presentation slides attached here



Risk Assessment & ID Workshop

Published Wed Jun 10/15 1:45pm.
Dr. Jessica Jones will be holding a two day workshop called Risky Business: Understanding Risk Assessments and Intellectual Disability in August 2015. Definitive dates have not yet been scheduled in order to accommodate any large groups that may be interested. Spots will be limited to ensure quality of learning. Should you be interested, please email Meg McQueen for additional date and location information.  Download the flyer for more information.

Update:

Two additional dates in September and October.  The first seminar is designed for front line workers, caregivers and DSW/PSW staff and will take place in September in Kingston, ON, Canada. The second seminar will take place in October and is a more advanced training for those with clinical backgrounds, researchers, administrators and professionals/ graduate students. Please feel free to forward information flyers to anyone you think would be interested.

New to Queen's this year?

Published Tue Jun 09/15 2:00pm.
All new residents are reminded that orientation activities have been scheduled from July 1-3, 2015.  Please be sure to check out our website for more details if you haven't already done so.  We're looking forward to welcoming you to our community shortly!

Talking to Children about Death and Dying

Published Fri Jun 05/15 12:00pm.
Presented by: Melissa Touw, RN, MScN, APN - Palliative Care

0800-0900
Friday June 12, 2015
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. Identify the barries when talking to children about death and dying of a loved one
2. Review the important aspects of child development when communicating about death and dying
3. Identify tools useful when communicating about death and dying

Flyer attached here.

Elder Abuse

Published Mon Jun 01/15 10:00am.
Presented by: Dr. Ingrid Harle

0800-0900
Friday June 5, 2015
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. Review the definition of elder abuse
2. Discuss prevalence rates
3. Identify risk factors
4. Review clinical manifestations
5. Consider screening and interventional appraoch

Flyer attached here.

Pediatric Palliative Care

Published Tue May 26/15 3:00pm.
Presented by: Dr. Craig Goldie

1800-0900
Friday May 29, 2015
36 Barrie Street

Objectives: (TBA)

Flyer attached here.
Presentation slides attached here.  

Hospice Kingston Today and into the Future

Published Tue May 19/15 9:00am.
Presented by: Natasha Girard

0800-0900
Friday May 22, 2015
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. Increase awareness about Hospice Kingston's programs and services
2. Learn how Hospice Kingston plans to improve access to quality hospice palliative care

Flyer attached here.

Providing Care for Aboriginal People of Canada

Published Wed May 13/15 10:00am.
Presented by: Dr. Jaimi Heidman, Palliative Medicine PGY3

0800-0900
Friday May 15, 2015
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:

1. Increase awareness of important cultural considerations to take into account when providing end-of-life care for Aboriginal peoples 
2. Discuss the various barriers limiting Aboriginal people in accessing culturally sensitive and high quality palliative care as well as ways in which access can be increased 

Flyer attached here

Providing Care for Aboriginal People of Canada

Published Wed May 13/15 10:00am.
Presented by: Dr. Jaimi Heidman, Palliative Medicine PGY3

0800-0900
Friday May 15, 2015
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:

1. Increase awareness of important cultural considerations to take into account when providing end-of-life care for Aboriginal peoples 
2. Discuss the various barriers limiting Aboriginal people in accessing culturally sensitive and high quality palliative care as well as ways in which access can be increased 

Flyer attached here                
Sign-in Sheet attached here
Evaluation form attached here

A Mindful Approach to Stress

Published Wed May 06/15 9:00am.
Presented by: Dr. John Smythe

0800-0900
Friday May 8, 2015
36 Barrie Street

John Smythe is a Pediatric Cardiologist and a Student Wellness Advisor with the Queens Faculty of Medicine. He has been a meditation instructor since 1996 and is a Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction teacher and Shambhala Meditation Training Director. He has provided Mindfulness Training Workshops for medical trainees and medical faculty since 2008.  His current research interests include self-compassion training for the prevention of compassion fatigue/burnout during medical school and residency. 

Flyer attached here.

And now for something completely different ... My Gift of Grace

Published Fri Apr 24/15 11:00am.
Presented by: Dr. Ray Viola

0800-0900
Friday May 1, 2015
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. Learn about a game to facilitate conversations about living and dying well
2. Play the game
3. Reflect on the game's potential or lack thereof

Flyer attached here.
Presentation slides attached here

Peter Warren Travelling Scholarship

Published Mon Apr 20/15 11:00am.
The Peter Warren Travelling Scholarship funds research projects undertaken by residents, in Royal College accredited programs, studying the history of specialty medicine or postgraduate medical education in Canada. It honours Dr. Charles Peter Warren, FRCPC, the inaugural chair of the Royal College’s History and Heritage Advisory Committee, who provided leadership in our history and heritage activities until his death in May 2011 and made significant contributions over his professional career to the history of medicine in Canada.  For further information and to find out how to apply, please view the awards section of the RCPSC website.

2015-2018 SE Regional Hospice Palliative Care Work Plan

Published Mon Apr 13/15 11:00am.
Presenter: Olga Nikolajev

0800-0900
Friday April 17, 2015
36 Barrie Street

Objectives: 
1. Learn about Provincial Palliative Care Planning Structures and Governance 
2. Highlight South East LHIN Hospice Palliative Care 2015-2018 Work Plan 
3. Engage palliative care community in partnership to improve care

Flyer attached here     
Presentation slides attached here

2015-2018 SE Regional Hospice Palliative Care Work Plan

Published Mon Apr 13/15 11:00am.
Presenter: Olga Nikolajev

0800-0900
Friday April 17, 2015
36 Barrie Street

Objectives: 
1. Learn about Provincial Palliative Care Planning Structures and Governance 
2. Highlight South East LHIN Hospice Palliative Care 2015-2018 Work Plan 
3. Engage palliative care community in partnership to improve care

Flyer attached here              
Sign-in sheet attached here    
Presentation slides attached here

It’s over. Now what?

Published Wed Apr 08/15 9:00am.

Our accreditation visitors have come and gone. They left behind a lot of compliments, some extreme interest in aspects of our curriculum, and a few areas they think we should continue to work on. And they left behind the opportunity to reflect.

Accreditation times are fraught with concerns and worry—are we doing the right thing? What is it they are looking for? Do we have “sufficient” evidence and exemplars?

But as we look back on the past year, and indeed on the past eight years, there is a very worthwhile component to accreditation. Accreditation is all about the learner (as are we all). And we need to remind ourselves of this—this is all about making the learning better for the students. So finding data to support our innovations, and finding evidence of the work we’ve been doing is all part of being able to reassure ourselves and our students that we are hard at work, putting things into place, for them. It was actually quite a stupendous picture of our program that presented itself in the tomes of reports we sent in. Queen’s UGME does many, many wonderful things for and with and through its students. 

Accreditation is also about looking at ourselves. Over the past year, so many people have contributed to making our “book” to the accreditors reflect the excellent work we’ve done. We have a wonderful program staff and leadership team that rose to this occasion as they have to many others. We have supportive and creative students who helped us over the past year.

Over the past eight years (since our last full visit) so many people have undertaken innovations to improve the student learning and to improve the program. We have amazing faculty who work extremely hard at their teaching and assessment and strive to master new concepts in educational pedagogy. We have wonderful staff who support our faculty in their work.  We have great technological support in MEdTech. We have students who have contributed to innumerable focus groups, committees, studies, innovations and evaluations to determine what is working and to help things work better.

Some of what the accreditation documents ask us for forces us to examine carefully what we have, and determine what can be added. Over the years, such aspects as our focus on diversity, service-learning and student learning environment have come to us as a result of accreditation. Our changes to SGL and FSGL have been a result of accreditation. Our enhanced work on formative assessment is a result of accreditation. Our governance structure, admissions process and many other aspects of the program have been prompted by accreditation.

Accreditation is also about planning for the future. We can’t stop evaluating ourselves, reflecting on our work, analyzing our successes and failures. This is an annual cycle that our CFRC reviews, our Curriculum Committee reports, our Course Director Surveys, etc. prompt us to undertake.

And we should be thinking of the innovations we’d like to make, now that the visit is over and we can return to our usual mode of exciting learning. This is not change for the sake of change, but change to improve. So thinking of Entrustable Professional Acts (EPA’s) and Milestones for UG, working on our narrative feedback, looking at the process of developing cases and what the literature says about this are three areas that appeal.

Now that the accreditors have come and gone, what do you take away from the preparation and the visit? And what will you aim for in the future?

A Review of the Treatment of Cancer-Associated Thrombosis

Published Tue Apr 07/15 12:00pm.
Presenter: Dr. Saneea Abboud

0800-0900
Friday April 10, 2015
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:

1. Outline the current evidence and recommendations for initial and long-term management of first and recurrent episodes of VTE 
2. Discuss the management of commonly encountered thrombotic complications 
3. Appreciate developing areas of research in the treatment of cancer-associated thrombosis 

Flyer attached here.

Matched to Queen's?

Published Wed Mar 25/15 2:00pm.
If you have recently matched to a Queen's residency program, you should be aware that our office has sent you a welcome email to the email address provided to us by CaRMS.  If you have not received this welcome email, please check your spam folder or contact us directly at pgme@queensu.ca or by phone at (613) 533-2543.

Accreditation Tips & Topics

Published Tue Mar 24/15 9:15am.
In our countdown to Accreditation 2015, we'll be releasing new tips every few days. Keep checking back for more great information! 

  1. Student feedback: We welcome and encourage student feedback through end-of-course evaluations. This feedback is reviewed by Course Directors and Year Directors and is used by the Course and Faculty Review Committee (CFRC) during its annual review of courses, influences recommendations, and is instrumental in improving the next iteration of each course.

  2. Student feedback: In addition to the end-of-course evaluation process, cohort academic reps meet regularly and on request with Course Directors during the delivery of courses in order to help keep the Course Directors aware of student concerns so, where warranted, they can make “in-course” corrections.

  3. Timelines:  When we think “new” or “innovative” or “substantial”, we might easily be reflecting on the past year (or maybe two). The accreditors are looking at what’s happened since our last full accreditation visit in 2007Keep that in mind when answering about what has changed.

  4. How do we know: We ensure accuracy in our delivery of learning event types by having anonymous student trackers report back on learning event types at the end of each term to ensure we’ve delivered on what we promised. This keeps us on track with our commitment to active learning, limiting lecture time to less than 50 percent in any course. (Standard ED-5A)

  5. It’s our Red Book and we see it every day: Students and faculty use the Red Book (our Competency Framework) every day when they access learning events in MEdTech. The objectives assigned to each course are provided in a drop down menu, and objectives related to each event are tagged. These guide individual instructors in preparing their sessional learning objectives and help learners with not only their current session, but to see connections between and among learning events.

  6. Speaking of objectives: Here is how the “Red Book” and our competency framework is organized:

  • We use the 7 roles of a physician that CanMEDS does.

  • Under each are approx. 2-3 competencies (“observable abilities that develop through stages” to a final outcome of our program and beyond to Residency and CME).

  • Under each of these are Program Objectives—explanations of how a program enables these competencies to be achieved, phrased as outcomes.

  • Under these are the Curricular Objectives—how each course, or group of courses enables competencies to be achieved. The Curriculum Committee assigns these to courses, and they form the Course Objectives.

  • Below that are the individual Learning Event Objectives that tie back to Curricular Objectives—these are put into MEdTech by the individual instructors for each learning event, with oversight by the Course Director.

In MEdTech, it looks like this:
learning event objectives in medtech

























7.  
Formative assessment: Formative assessment is "information communicated to the learner that is intended to modify his or her thinking or behaviour for the purpose of improving learning" (Shute, 2008, pg. 154). Each course offers formative assessment designed to provide feedback to students that will enable them to assess their level of achievement and ongoing learning needs. It is a collaborative process between teacher and student for the purpose of providing feedback in a timely fashion so that students may improve before their summative (final) assessment. Formative assessments may or may not be graded; if they are graded, they receive a small percentage of the final grade. Examples of formative assessment are: quizzes, RATs, written narrative feedback on assignments, mid-term exams, or mid-rotation assessments.

8.  What is Blueprinting and why do we do it?  Course Directors map how the assigned curricular objectives and assigned Medical Council of Canada clinical presentations are assessed in their course. In doing so, the course blueprint offers opportunities to scrutinize how the learning and assessment is happening in their courses.  Having blueprinted their course also helps Course Directors with the planning of the next iteration of the courses:  it may become apparent that a particular learning objective has not been assessed on the final exam for the past few years. A course blueprint becomes an instructional tool to guide course design and assessment.

Dr. Steven Brooks brings PulsePoint to Canada

Published Tue Mar 24/15 8:00am.

Queen’s University researcher Steven Brooks, working with the City of Kingston, Kingston Fire and Rescue and a number of other community partners, is launching PulsePoint, a mobile app that can save lives. This marks the first PulsePoint launch in Canada.

Working with the Kingston Fire and Rescue dispatch system, the app will alert users trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) when someone in a nearby public place needs CPR. The app also shows alerted CPR-trained individuals where to find a public automated external defibrillator (AED) if one is close.

“Calling 911, starting CPR and using an AED are the most significant interventions a bystander can make when someone suffers a cardiac arrest, doubling the chances of survival,” says Dr. Brooks, an emergency physician and clinician-scientist at Queen’s University and Kingston General Hospital. “Currently, the out-of-hospital survival rate for cardiac arrest is just five per cent in Canada. We can do better than this, and our hope is that PulsePoint will increase bystander intervention and help save more lives.”

Developed by Californian firefighters, making PulsePoint available in Kingston required a partnership that included Kingston Fire and Rescue, the Heart and Stroke Foundation, Kingston General Hospital, Queen’s University and Bell Canada.

Chet Babcock, a cardiac arrest survivor, says an AED saved his life. Babcock’s CPR-trained hockey teammates, James McConnell and Casey Trudeau, administered CPR when he went into cardiac arrest at the INVISTA Centre. A third teammate, Mike Sears, went in search of a defibrillator. He found one with the help of Brad Amell, a volunteer firefighter who was in the foyer. They rushed back to administer the shock that likely restarted Babcock’s heart.

“The cardiac surgeon said that I would have had brain damage or died after five minutes if the AED [automated external defibrillator] hadn’t been used,” says Mr. Babcock, who is alive today thanks to the defibrillator.  “Needless to say, I am a big supporter of AEDs.”

 “Cardiac arrest is one of the leading causes of preventable death and we know there are 40,000 sudden cardiac arrests in Canada each year. That’s one every 13 minutes. PulsePoint is all about connecting those who are CPR-trained to save lives with those who need their help,” says Richard Price, PulsePoint Foundation president.

Go to pulsepoint.org to download the app on your Apple or Android device if you are trained in CPR. The Queen’s community will also have an opportunity to sign up for PulsePoint April 7 at 1:30 pm during a demonstration at the ARC. 

By Anne Craig
Queen's Communications Officer

From Order to Infusion:

Published Mon Mar 23/15 10:00am.

Presenter: Jen Baker, RPH

0800-0900
Friday March 27, 2015
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1.  To understand the process of a home care medication from prescribing physician to the patient 
2. To become aware of the common issues that occur that may result in delays in the order reaching the patient

Flyer attached here.

PARO awards Dr. Susan Finch and Ms. Chantal Van Parys

Published Fri Mar 20/15 9:00am.
Dr. Susan Finch of the Department of Psychiatry has been awarded as this year's recipient of the Professional Association of Residents of Ontario (PARO) Excellence in Clinical Teaching Award for Queen's University. The award has become a well-recognized way for residents to acknowledge clinical teachers who have excelled in their role.

Additionally, Ms. Chantal Van Parys from our Department of Family Medicine (at the Peterborough-Kawartha site) has been chosen as the recipient of the Lois H. Ross Resident Advocate Award. This award is given to one individual each year, at any site, who consistently advocates on behalf of residents and resident issues, within their role as either an administrator, teacher or clinician.

The recipients will be honoured on May 8, 2015 and a donation of $1,000 will be made to the charity of their choice. Congratulations to both Dr. Finch and Ms. Van Parys!

Susan Cole appointed inaugural Chair for new Division of Cancer Pharmacology of ASPET

Published Mon Mar 16/15 10:00am.

Dr. Susan Cole has been appointed the inaugural Chair of a new Division for Cancer Pharmacology that has been formed by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics (ASPET). The division was formed to serve Society members with interests in cancer pharmacology. 

Dr. Susan Cole currently holds the Canada Research Chair position in Cancer Biology and is the Bracken Chair of Genetics and Molecular Medicine at Queen's University. She is a professor with the Department of Pathology & Molecular Medicine and is cross-appointed with the Department of Biomedical & Molecular Sciences. She is also a Principal Investigator with the Queen's Cancer Research Institute.

ASPET is a 4,800 member scientific society whose members conduct basic and clinical pharmacological research, and work for academia, government, pharmaceutical and biotech companies, as well as non-profit organizations.

Read the full announcement here

Medication at the End Life - Management Dilemmas in the community Setting

Published Fri Mar 13/15 3:00pm.
Presenter: Dr. Stephanie Connidis

0800-0900
Friday March 20, 2015
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. Recognize challenges in determining when restlessness/loss of symptom control may be iatrogenic
2. Review common medication interactions
3. Discuss possible strategies to mitigate interactions

Flyer attached here.

Medication at the End Life - Management Dilemmas in the community Setting

Published Fri Mar 13/15 3:00pm.
Presenter: Dr. Stephanie Connidis

0800-0900
Friday March 20, 2015
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. Recognize challenges in determining when restlessness/loss of symptom control may be iatrogenic
2. Review common medication interactions
3. Discuss possible strategies to mitigate interactions

Flyer attached here.

A Review of the CFRC Process

Published Tue Mar 10/15 12:30pm.

As we march ever so quickly towards our accreditation visit, we thought it would be useful to have a quick review of the Course and Faculty Review Committee (CFRC) and current status of course and faculty evaluations.

For years, course review and faculty evaluations were somewhat disjointed and often relied on a paper process.  Reviews were not received consistently and evaluating these reviews was even more troublesome.  In the past, evaluations were not mandatory, and hence, completion rates were variable, making the data of questionable reliability and validity. A final wrinkle was that the students often felt evaluation fatigue.  They were being asked to complete more evaluations, and there was not a system in place that ensured that we were responsive in addressing issues identified from either the course or faculty evaluations, which could provide opportunities for improvement in our curriculum.

Along came Dr. Andrea Winthrop in 2011. She had just relocated from the Medical College of Wisconsin where she had been an active member and at one point, Chair of their Curriculum Evaluation Committee.  The perfect solution became apparent.  We had a process that wasn’t working and we now had someone with experience and energy to help develop a process that would work for us.  Dr. Winthrop became the first director of the CFRC. She held her first CFRC meeting in November of 2011 and subsequent to that has developed a mean machine for us to use to continually review and improve our undergraduate medical education curriculum.  

What follows, may seem a bit technical, but I felt it important information so that by reading this, it would provide you with a good idea of the complex but comprehensive system we now have in place for course and faculty reviews.

Pre-clerkship Evaluation Process:

  • Students evaluate the course, as well as faculty members who teach at least 4 hours
  • Course and faculty evaluations are open from day 1 of the course so that students can populate the evaluation forms in real time
  • Faculty evaluations for those with less than 4 contact hours are open to the students to evaluate if they wish to provide feedback
  • Pooled course and faculty evaluation data and thematic reports are sent to the CFRC at the completion of the course as well as to the Course Director, Year Director and Department Head
  • Individual faculty evaluations are posted to MEdTech (secured behind their individual NetID) and remain there to accumulate. 

Clerkship Evaluation Process:

  • Evaluations are opened at the beginning of each block (both course and preceptor evaluations)
  • Students are required to evaluate a minimum of 2 and a suggested maximum of 4 preceptors per rotation/sub-rotation
  • Pooled rotation data and thematic reports are provided to the Course Directors & Year Directors after every 4 blocks and annually to the CFRC
  • Preceptor evaluation data is provided to the faculty member (posted to individual MEdTech accounts) following student graduation. 
  • Regional rotation data are reviewed on an annual basis and faculty evaluations are disseminated to regional preceptors after students have graduated

CFRC Process

CFRC members are tasked with a review of the individual courses. They do so by reviewing the thematic analysis provided by the Educational Development team, the pooled course and faculty evaluation data, the Course Director Survey provided by the Course Director and usually, through an interview with the Course Director. Recommendations and Action Plans are then reviewed by the CFRC for approval.  Finalized CFRC reports are sent to Course and Year Directors and if major issues are identified, these are sent to the Curriculum Committee.  Courses undergo a Full review a minimum of every three years and a truncated Screening review in other years.  However, if there are any red flags, a change in Course Director or significant change to the curriculum, the Screening Review reverts to a Full review. 

As you can see from the above processes, we now have a complex process that ensures faculty and course review data are received, reviewed and acted upon.  Loop closure is in place that includes the requirement that the Course and Year Director will provide feedback to our students about changes that have resulted from their valuable input.  The CFRC has now reviewed every course up to this term with most having now been through two to three cycles. Hundreds of recommendations and action plans have been implemented and the continuous improvement process helps to ensure our students are receiving a top notch educational experience.  

Our process should shine in the eyes of our accreditors.

Lewis Tomalty
Director, CFRC

Karen Yeates receives $1m for Tanzanian pregnancy health program

Published Fri Mar 06/15 12:00pm.
Queen’s University researcher Karen Yeates has received $1 million in funding to develop a mobile platform to record and monitor the health of pregnant women. The five-year project will implement and test ways of improving the monitoring of pregnant women in Tanzania for preeclampsia-eclampsia and other important health outcomes.

Dr. Yeates is working with Graeme Smith (Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology), Chandra Tayade (Biomedical and Molecular Sciences) and Jessica Sleeth (Office of Global Health) from Queen’s University and partnering with Godfrey Mbaruku, an obstetrician working with the Ifakara Health Institute in Tanzania. The Tanzanian Ministry of Health and Social Welfare are also involved in the project.

Read the full story here.

CaRMS Success!

Published Fri Mar 06/15 11:00am.
Best-Ever Results for Queen's!  As many of you will be aware, the CaRMS match results were released on March 4, 2015.  Many Queen's residents volunteer their time to assist with their program's interview days and you are a key part of the process.  Our residents give generously of their time, meeting prospective residents in interviews, discussion panels, luncheons, and social events.  We were so pleased this year to have received our best-ever match results.  

There were 133 positions available at Queen's this year and all but three positions filled in the first iteration match.  Of the seventeen medical schools in Canada, only one filled all of its positions and Queen's was tied for the second-best match results in the country.  These results are a testament to the quality of our programs and the reputation of residency education at Queen's University.

Over the last three years, the Postgraduate Medical Education office has worked closely with our programs to develop a variety of recruitment resources including promotional videos, new program websites, recruitment brochures, and regular applicant bulletins.

Welcome New Residents!

Published Fri Mar 06/15 11:00am.
We are pleased to congratulate all of the medical students who recently matched to Queen's!  You will be receiving registration information shortly.  If you have any questions in the meantime, please contact our office at pgme@queensu.ca.  Congratulations once again; we're pleased to welcome you to our postgraduate community!

What does haemoglobin of 90 have to do with assessment in medical education?

Published Thu Feb 26/15 11:00am.

When I am meeting with faculty members, new or ‘seasoned’, who are keen to teach medical students, many of them note that while they love working with students, they may feel uncomfortable with assessing students. On the one hand, this is not a surprise, since most of us were not taught this in medical school or residency, but, on the other hand, clinicians are well-equipped to assess medical students, because the principles of assessing students are often very similar to how we approach patient care.

If I approach a physician and ask, "Dr. X, I have a patient whose haemoglobin is 90. Should I give her a blood transfusion?", no competent doc would give me a yes or no answer without knowing a lot more about the patient. One would want know what symptoms the patient was having, her age, location of treatment and all about her past medical history. Any physician would ask for details about the relevant physical examination, and about other investigations that had been performed. Many physicians would engage in a discussion about the patient, discussing the pros and cons of transfusions in general, and in the context of this patient, and would explore other options – largely since, as is often in the case in medicine, there is no clear single answer that can be applied to all patients.

Many physicians would question if I was sure the haemoglobin was "valid" - i.e. did that measurement actually represent what was going on with the patient's blood or could there have been a measurement error? They likely would not want to make a reasonably high-stakes decision based only on one measurement. Doctors would want to know what the patient’s haemoglobin was yesterday and before, to help inform their answer. They might even want to know what it is in four hours, or tomorrow, before they draw any conclusions.

I always choose haemoglobin of 90 for this scenario. It is perfectly in the gray zone. It could be completely appropriate to transfuse, or not, depending on the circumstances of the patient. Also of importance in this scenario is that giving a patient a blood transfusion is a reasonably high stakes intervention, as opposed to some other interventions we could use. In other words, the decision made will have significant implications for the patient.  

How does this relate to assessment in medical education? And in particular, how does this relate to the assessment principles we have adopted in the Undergraduate Medical Education (UGME) program?

1. We make decisions about student performance based on multiple points of assessment

Decisions about student performance should not be made only based on one test score. Just as we rely on a complete history from our patient, carry out an appropriate physical exam, review investigations, and maybe even order more tests for our patients, we must look over all the student’s work. We can then attempt to determine if circumstances might have affected that score, to help us to interpret what it means about that student’s performance. In UGME, we look collectively at a student’s work in a given course, term, or year when we make recommendations about course standing. We are then able to make informed recommendations about supports students might need to succeed. We ensure that there are multiple forms of assessment in each course, so we are using a variety of sources of information. In any given course, these methods are chosen to meet the needs of the assessment blueprint, demonstrating that that students’ learning of the course objectives and Medical Council of Canada presentations are assessed appropriately.

In addition to multiple points of assessment, we have systems in place where very high stakes decisions such as those that might require a student to undergo significant remediation, require that the student’s performance be reviewed by multiple individuals, first at an examiner’s meeting of faculty from the relevant component of the curriculum, and then at the Progress & Promotions Committee for an arms-length vetting. This approach may be used in clinical medicine for particularly challenging decisions, where we may use a case-conference approach, or a tumour board, bringing in the input and expertise of many.

Thus, all decisions about student performance are made based on rich data that is appropriately reviewed in a careful fashion – just as we would normally approach a clinical scenario.

2. We ensure we are using high quality assessments.

We have implemented processes to ensure that the tests we use are high quality assessments. Are they testing what we think they are testing? How can we minimize measurement error? Just as any one haemoglobin measurement might be inaccurate, even with carefully calibrated equipment, test scores can be misleading. If 50% of a class of medical students failed a midterm, it is likely there was a flaw in the construction of the midterm (since medical students always study!) In UGME, we have a process to have examinations and other high stakes assessments reviewed by a team of faculty members, assessment experts, and others as required. After the tests are administered, we undertake item analysis to determine if any of the questions could be of concern, and should be deleted. For other forms of assessment, we have looked to the literature for tools that could be adopted in our setting, and the Student Assessment Committee will vet novel assessment strategies for quality and provide feedback to course directors. Again, the results of these assessments are reviewed first by a course director, and then at an examiners’ meeting to ensure that the data is of good quality, and should be used to inform decision-making about student performance.

3. We support and promote assessment for learning, including the use of formative assessment and ongoing feedback for our students.

In UGME, assessment is ongoing and must exist to support student learning. In medicine, we would never transfuse our patient (or not transfuse our patient!) and then stop thinking about why they had a low level. Efforts would be made to address the underlying condition that led to the problem, and then to fix that problem. In UGME, we have embedded formative assessment and feedback into all of our courses allowing us to provide appropriate information back to students about their performance. Either they can address areas that require improvement; we can provide supports, or both. In clerkship, clinical skills, and other similar settings, this must involve direct observation of student performance, along with other assessment methods. In medicine, our goal should not be to simply ‘fix the number’, and this is the case in medical education as well. We want our patients and learners to thrive, and we should give them the information and supports they need to do this.

If we return to our patient- should she receive a transfusion? The answer is clearly “it depends.” We should be careful to be clear that our learners don’t have a disease – this is the main danger of this metaphor. However, the next time you are asked to assess one of your learners, it might help to think of what you are doing as being very similar to the clinical approach that you use on a daily basis. And, if you are one of our very valued faculty members who is not a clinician, your expertise in research and other related fields will stand you in good stead to assess our students in what you are teaching them… and maybe you can come up with the next great assessment metaphor!

Michelle Gibson
Assistant Professor, Division of Geriatric Medicine
Director, Year 1, Undergraduate Medical Education

At the leading edge of heart and stroke care

Published Fri Feb 20/15 9:00am.

Advances in recent years have drastically changed the outlook for those suffering from cardiovascular disease. A host of new technologies, medications and procedures have increased survival rates and have smoothed out many of the bumps that were once a common part of the recovery process.

“Cardiovascular disease is no longer the number one cause of death in Canada,” says Dr. Chris Simpson, Chief of Cardiology at Queen’s. “All of the advances, both in technology and treatment, have improved the chances of survival and recovery.”

One of the areas where Dr. Simpson has been making strides is the utilization of new leadless pacemakers. The current generation of pacemakers are implanted surgically under the skin, with a long wire feeding from the pacemaker into the heart, delivering a pulse when necessary. The new generation have been miniaturized, compressing all of their hardware into a small, thin capsule which screws right into the heart.

They’re so small that the pacemakers can be implanted without major incisions, going through a vein in the groin and travelling up to the heart. The process creates no scars, requires no stitches and the pacemaker isn’t visible from outside the body.

“The Achilles heel of pacemaker insertion has always been infection, which will be drastically reduced with the new models,” says Dr. Simpson.

It’s just one of the many modern improvements to heart treatment happening at KGH-Queen’s.

Breathing easier

Dr. Christine D’Arsigny (Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine) is treating arterial hypertension with new medications and has had very encouraging results.

“These new therapies we’re using have led to a dramatic impact on quality of life for those affected,” she says. “We’re continuing to learn more about the disease and perfecting our medication treatments.”

Pulmonary hypertension is an increase in blood pressure in the blood vessels within the lungs. Those afflicted are often struck by shortness of breath, dizziness, fainting and have a high death rate from the disease, if left untreated. Previously, treatment was limited to IV-therapy and organ transplantation, often not an option for people who were too sick to undergo surgery. This is also true for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, another cause for pulmonary hypertension

The new drugs Dr. D’Arsigny is prescribing work to dilate the pulmonary vessels and change cell signalling, resulting in better blood flow through the lungs, a decrease in shortness of breath and alleviation of other symptoms. The end result is improved quality of life and improved survival.

“These oral medications have provided an excellent treatment option,” Dr. D’Arsigny says. “The improvements I’ve seen in some of my patients have been dramatic —I have had some patients go from barely walking without getting short of breath to thinking they can go skiing again.”

Solving the mystery of strokes

Promising new research has shed light on one of the longstanding mysteries of strokes. For nearly 30 per cent of stroke victims, the cause of the stroke is not readily apparent after medical examination. A new study, co-authored by Dr. Albert Jin (Neurology) and published in the New England Journal of Medicine, takes a big leap forward toward understanding the problem.

“We typically perform an electrocardiogram that runs for 24 hours, and it’s often not adequate” says Dr. Albert Jin.

He instead made use of a new cardiac monitoring method that tracked heart behaviour continuously for 30 days. This revealed that many of the strokes were caused by atrial fibrillation, an abnormal heart rhythm.

“Our detection rate increased sixfold, showing us that 18 per cent of people had atrial fibrillation," he says. "That translates to hundreds if not thousands of Ontarians each year that now have a recognized cause of stroke that we can treat.”

Another of the major causes of stroke is the formation of blood clots which restrict circulation to the brain. Dr. Jin is taking part in another new study that seeks to better treat these strokes. Current treatment focuses on medications which target and break up the blood clot; the new study supplements this treatment with ultrasound waves which help to further dissolve the clot.

By applying ultrasound waves to the brain, Dr. Jin is able to specifically target the clot, complementing the work of the medication. Though there are safety risks for ultrasound waves in lower frequencies (think of the booming bass of car stereo), the study makes use waves in a higher frequency.

“There’s been ample safety work done and it’s been demonstrated that ultrasound waves tuned to a higher frequency are safe,” Dr. Jin says.

Though the new study is only just beginning, work being done at KGH-Queen’s is making the prognosis for stroke victims brighter.

Better data

Treatment for strokes and heart-related health problems has long been hindered by a lack of information. When searching for the causes of a stroke, for example, technological limitations meant that doctors could only track a patient`s heart pattern for 24 hours at a time. They then had to project that information into the future, assuming the heart would function the same way for weeks at a time. That made heart monitoring a difficult process, says Dr. Adrian Baranchuk (Cardiology).

“The patient would have to reconnect to the monitor every day. It was inconvenient, it irritated the skin and people had to plan their lives around access to the heart monitor.”

That’s why Dr. Baranchuk has been eagerly putting into practice new technology that makes the whole process more reliable, safer and less invasive. He’s begun fitting his patients with a new monitor called the Reveal LINQ by Medtronic. At less than two inches in length, the monitor is so small that it removes the need for serious surgical insertion.

In a procedure that only takes about two minutes to conduct, Dr. Baranchuk makes a minor incision, inserts the monitor and bandages the patient up. The incision’s small size drastically reduces the risk of infection, removing the need for stitches and antibiotics and the monitor can function for three years, providing steady heart rhythm data.

“As a global approach, heart rhythm monitoring allows you to detect arrhythmias and decide whether someone needs medication, a pacemaker or other treatment,” says Dr. Baranchuk. “This is going to be future of heart monitoring.”

An overview of our UGME curriculum

Published Thu Feb 19/15 3:00pm.

Our curriculum and program have evolved over the past 7 years. Here’s how:

On the first day, the “Red Book” was written, and it was good.  There was rejoicing throughout the land. Everybody liked the Red Book.

  1. Our Curriculum is designed on the basis of the Roles, Competencies, Program Objectives and Curricular Objectives defined in the “Red Book”, a.k.a. “Curricular Goals and Competency Based Objectives”.  Translation:  Everything we do flows from the Red Book.  If it’s in the Red book, we do it.  If it’s not in the Red Book, we don’t have to.
  2. We have defined 14 Competencies, based on the 7 key Physician Roles which derive from the CanMEDS and Family Medicine principles.  These Competencies guide all aspects of curricular design, teaching and assessment.
  3. The Competencies are further refined into (total of 27) Program Objectives.  These Program Objectives are the key components that allow for definition of our course structure and overall curricular design. 
  4. Of critical importance is the fact that these Program Objectives define the domains in which student achievement must be documented in a course and over four years.
  5. For the purposes of clarifying teaching and learning objectives for both faculty and students, each Program Objective is further divided into a variable number of Curricular Objectives.  We have defined a total of 91 Curricular Objectives.  Specific learning objectives for a learning event may be described under these.
  6. The 4 Program Objectives that define the Medical Expert Role are further guided and delivered in the context of the Medical Council of Canada’s Clinical Presentations. 
  7. NB:  All the assigned Red Book program and curricular objectives and the MCC clinical presentations are entered into MEdTech for each course and form the basis for learning objectives in drop-down menus for each learning event.

Courses were built…

What is our course structure?

  1. Our curriculum uses a Course structure.  For operational purposes, a course can be defined as a time and term limited sequence of learning and assessment experiences designed to ensure the appropriate teaching and assessment of a subset of Program Objectives and MCC Presentations.
  2. These are the types of courses we have:  Scientific Foundations, Clinical Foundations, Clinical and Communication Skills, Professional Foundations, Clerkship Core Academic and Clerkship Clinical course.  We use the courses to scaffold (or build upon) student learning from Ideas to Connections to Extensions.

 

Curricular objectives were integrated…

How do the curricular objectives fit into the courses?

  1.  Medical Expert Role and Competencies:  Many of our courses are designed and sequenced to ensure the 4 Program Objectives associated with the Medical Expert role are taught and assessed appropriately.  The Curriculum Committee assigns a subset of the 4 Medical Expert Program Objectives and MCC Clinical Presentations to most courses, with the expectation that they would align with, and inform teaching methods, content, and assessment.  (The committee also assigns other competency objectives…see #2)

 


  1. Intrinsic Roles and Competencies:  Achieving competency in the 23 Program Objectives that constitute the six so-called “non-medical expert” or “intrinsic” roles (Professional, Scholar, Communicator, Collaborator, Advocate, Manager) requires a combination of factual information, lived experiences, targeted assignments, reflection and feedback, integration with other courses and must be continuing and progressive throughout the curriculum.  The Curriculum Committee, assigns these program objectives as well.  The “curriculum” for these objectives will therefore require a combination of: courses dedicated to specific roles (CARL, Professional Foundations), integration within other courses, special events as part of courses, and longitudinal assignments and programs (First Patient Project, Observerships, Community Based Projects…)

 

Course Directors, Competency Leads and Directors were created…

Who looks after Courses?

  1. Each of the courses is managed by a Course Director, whose responsibility is to:
  • Develop a teaching plan that ensure the assigned Program Objectives, Learning Objectives and MCC Presentations are taught
  • Ensure a variety of teaching methodologies are employed so that integrated and applied learning as well as provision of information are accomplished
  • Develop an assessment plan that ensures that students have met the assigned Program and Curricular Objectives and MCC Presentations.
  • Provide a blueprint of the exams and of the course.
  • Regularly review and revise the course structure based on a variety of feedback.
  1. Responsibility for oversight for each of the intrinsic roles is entrusted to a Competency Lead.
  • Identification and integration of all curricular learning opportunities relevant to the defined Program and Curricular Objectives
  • Identification of any gaps in the provision of learning and assessment opportunities relevant to the defined Program Objectives
  • Development, as required, of new curricular content to address gaps.
  • Ensuring a variety of teaching methodologies is employed so that integrative and applied learning as well as providing information is accomplished
  • Development of an assessment plan that ensures the assigned Program Objectives have been mastered.
  • Regular review and revision of the role “map” including relevant learning opportunities and programs, based on a variety of feedback.
  • Provide continuity over years, guidance for changes, innovations, etc.
  1. A number of roles have been developed to provide oversight for large components of the Curriculum:
  • Director, Year 1: Provides oversight for all Year 1 courses and support to those Course Directors
  • Director, Year 2: Provides oversight for all Year 2 courses and support to those Course Directors
  • Director, Clinical Skills:  Directs all Clinical Skills courses
  • Director, FSGL:  Directs Facilitated Small Group Learning events throughout the curriculum, coordinating with Course Directors and Competency Leads.
  • Director, Clinical Clerkship: Provides oversight for all Clerkship clinical rotations and support to those Course Directors
  • Director, Clerkship Curriculum:  Provides oversight of the three Clerkship Curriculum courses and support to those Course Directors


Communication channels were developed to ensure continuity

Communication among Curricular Leads:  Competency Leads and Course Directors undertake a regular dialogue that ensures appropriate integration and assessment. The Curriculum Committee assigns program and curricular objectives.  The Year Directors, representatives from the Professional Foundations and Course Directors meet together at the Curriculum Committee, and share reports. Year Directors communicate and meet with the Course Directors in their year, and have an Examiners’ meeting twice annually to go over assessment for each course over each term.

 

Committees were created…

What committees provide curricular oversight?

  1. The Curriculum Committee has “Integrated institutional responsibility for the overall design, management and evaluation of a coherent and coordinated curriculum” (as per accreditation standard ED-33).  It must therefore review, make recommendations and have final approval of all curricular content.
  2. The Professional Foundations Committee brings together all Competency Leads and other key faculty and administrative personnel to provide coordinated delivery and assessment of these objectives. The Professional Foundations Committee is a sub-committee of the Curriculum Committee and makes all recommendations for curricular revision through that committee.
  3. The Teaching, Learning and Innovations Committee is a sub-committee of the Curriculum Committee.  The mandate of the Teaching, Learning and Innovation Committee (TLIC) is to ensure the optimal use of instructional methodologies and technologies within the Undergraduate Medical Education Program, consistent with accreditation and current educational standards. It reports to and makes recommendations for change through the Curriculum Committee.
  4. The Student Assessment Committee is a sub-committee of the Curriculum Committee.  It has responsibility for developing principles and processes for student assessment and for regular review of assessment methods provided in all components of the curriculum. It reports to and makes recommendations for change through the Curriculum Committee.
  5. The Course and Faculty Review Committee is a sub-committee of the Curriculum Committee.  The Course and Faculty Review Committee, provides systematic and impartial course and faculty reviews and develops reporting processes ensuring compliance with relevant accreditation standards. It reports to and makes recommendations for change through the Curriculum Committee.
  6. The UGME Program Evaluation Committee is a sub-committee of the Curriculum Committee.  The Program Evaluation Committee provides faculty and administration with timely feedback in order to refine and improve MD program. It collects quantitative and qualitative data on curriculum and supporting activities in order to inform decision making at all levels in the School.

 

How do the committees communicate with each other?

  1. The Teaching and Learning Committee, Student Assessment Committee, Course and Faculty Review Committee and Program Evaluation Committee regularly liaise with each other through reports to the Curriculum Committee.  Each Chair sits on the Curriculum Committee.  Minutes are available on MEdTech Communities as are Terms of Reference.


There was stability and peace in the land…

After 5 years of change, what does our curriculum map look like in 2015?

Chris Simpson's messge to Council of the Federation

Published Wed Feb 18/15 4:00pm.
Dr. Chris Simpson, President of the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) and Chair of the Division of Cardiology talks about the need for a National Seniors' Strategy:

Service-Learning at Queen’s UGME

Published Thu Feb 12/15 3:00pm.

Two key values of the Queen’s Undergraduate Medical Education (UGME) curriculum are learning and citizenship.  Under learning, we affirm that “we foster an environment that optimizes learning in pre-clinical and clinical settings,” and under citizenship, we profess that “we believe our students should be active contributors and participants in the leadership of their communities, society and professional organizations.” (UGME Curricular Goals and Competency Based Objectives, p.7)

Combining these two values together results in innovations such as service-learning, a concept that is more than community service or volunteer work, yet not the equivalent of internship learning.        

At Queen’s medicine, we regard service-learning as a three-part process which incorporates preparation, service, and reflection

The core components of service-learning include:

  • Formal, deliberate preparation, which includes consulting with the members of the community who will be served by a project and which may include classroom instruction or another form of mentorship/coaching. A plan, detailing both the intended service and learning outcomes is created.

The “service” and “learning” are completed:

  • The learner reflects on the process, the service and the learning.
    (This may occur throughout the project or period of service). The learner provides evidence of learning. (This could be provided in different ways, for example, through written reflections or an interview with a preceptor).

Through its Statement of Commitment to Service-Learning the School of Medicine has undertaken to:

  • Provide students with information about available community service opportunities in Canada and internationally
  • Acknowledge students’ participation in service learning
  • Ensure students connect service-learning experiences to their educational goals
  • Allocate funds to help support service-learning activities
  • Offer faculty and staff mentorship for student-run workshops, conferences and other events related to service learning


Although there is no mandatory requirement that medical students participate in a service-learning experience, such activities have been made available and engaged by students with steadily increasing numbers over the past several years.  Eighty-four students reported involvement that would meet the definition of service-learning in 2013-14.  Those opportunities include MedExplore (left), Altitude, Queen’s Community Health Talks (below, right) and Global Health Service-Learning. 

To continue and grow these service-learning projects, we have undertaken the creation of a Service-Learning Panel, with funding to allocate to support and promote service learning.  This includes:

  1. Engage the curriculum about service learning with a definition, a Service Learning Lead and learning events.
  2. Facilitate student contact with service agencies in the community
  3. Support service-learning projects with funding, counseling, and communication strategies.
  4. Recognizing individual students’ service-learning activities in the Medical Student Performance Record.
  1. Providing opportunities for students to share their learning experiences with their peers through existing venues or a new event

Going forward, students are able to submit individual activities for inclusion which will be included if they meet our service learning criteria. Meds students were surveyed on their participation in community service activities. Of those who responded, 55.9% said that they had participated in community volunteer work over the past year.

Encouraging opportunities for service-learning should in no way suggest that other, equally-worthy, voluntary service is not valued by the School of Medicine, Queen’s or the wider Kingston community (and other communities in which our students find themselves). However, because of the integrated nature of service-learning, it has the potential to provide unique opportunities for our students and our communities.

Queen's Medicine Health Talks on Smoking Cessation

Published Thu Feb 12/15 8:00am.

In collaboration with KFL&A Public Health, Queen's Medicine Health Talks is excited to introduce “Let’s Talk Tips to Quit,” a talk focused on smoking cessation.  As usual the talks are free of charge and everyone is welcome. Join us Thursday, February 19th at KFL&A from 6-7pm located at 221 Portsmouth Avenue.

Please RSVP to this event at: http://meds.queensu.ca/home/medical_education/qmedhealthtalks

If you’d like more information on Queen’s Medicine Health Talks or have any questions please feel free to contact us at qmht@qmed.ca

Queen's Medicine Health Talks smoking cessation poster

2015 Economics & Healthcare Speaker Series

Published Wed Feb 11/15 3:00pm.
The Monieson Centre for Business Research in Healthcare proudly presents the third Economics and Healthcare Speaker Series. Drawing three noted scholars from leading business schools and economics departments, this series introduces forward-thinking economic theory to challenges in healthcare. 

January 30: Transparency and Negotiated Prices, by Matthew Grennan
February 13: Insurer Competition and Negotiated Prices, by Robin S. Lee
March 27: Speaker Topic TBA, by Ben Handel

Healthcare & Economics speaker series poster

The Experience of Hope in Palliative Care

Published Mon Feb 09/15 10:15am.
Presented by Dr. Jaimi Heidman

0800-0900
February 13, 2015
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:

1. Discuss the notion of hope in palliative care and the factors that influence it  
2. Discuss ways in which to assess hope in palliative care patients 
3. Consider ways in which to maintain or facilitate hope in terminally ill patients  

Flyer attached here.

Palliative Wound Care

Published Mon Feb 02/15 9:15am.
Presented by: Dr. Saneea Abboud

0800-0900
Friday February 6, 2015
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:

1. Discuss the concept of palliative wound management 
2. Apply palliative management strategies to common wound related symptoms 
3. Become familiar with major wound dressing groups and their common applications

Flyer attached here.


WONCA World Rural Health Conference

Published Thu Jan 29/15 9:00am.
We invite you all to Dubrovnik to the 13th WONCA World Rural Health Conference. http://woncarural2015.com/

This year the conference will be hosting a student and junior doctor session for the first time.  We hope to encourage you to learn more about rural health and explore the possibilities of working in this exciting field.  

The YDM (VdGM and Polaris) and IFMSA have been collaborating with the organizing committee to find topics of interest for junior doctors and students.  

We are planning workshops which will focus on rural health diversity around the world, the difficulties in recruitment and retention of rural practitioners, the importance of leadership and mentorship, and how we can better involve students in rural practice.  To reach as many people as possible, we will facilitate a Twitter chat for some of the workshops.  

There will be an open paper session for students.  Please submit your work and share your experiences with us.  

As part of the conference we are also encouraging junior doctors who already work in rural areas to make short video diaries about their experiences.   These will be posted on the VdGM YouTube channel and used to promote discussion on a wide range of topics.  http://vdgm.woncaeurope.org/content/ydm-rural-health-%E2%80%93-video-diaries

This conference will offer you a unique opportunity to meet rural practitioners from around the world and learn from rural practice leaders.   We hope you join us in Dubrovnik.  


Stopping cancer in its tracks

Published Mon Jan 26/15 11:00am.

Researcher Andrew Craig understands the importance of stopping metastasis, the leading cause of cancer-related deaths. And with an innovation grant of $193,798 from the Canadian Cancer Society (CCS), Dr. Craig and his team hope to get one step closer.

“Metastasis – or the spread of cancer from its primary tumour site to another location in the body – is a critical stage to prevent. This grant from the CCS will allow us to conduct research on metastasis and develop new tools to prevent it,” says Dr. Craig. “Many current therapies are focused on trying to shrink tumours and have a limited ability to prevent the spread of tumours.

Dr. Craig and several talented trainees are developing and testing inhibitory antibodies targeting key signals that cancer cells require for metastasis.  These novel antibodies are being developed with collaborators in Toronto, and Dr. Craig’s team is actively profiling them to identify the most effective ones against highly metastatic breast and skin cancers. 

Antibodies are proteins found in the blood that are produced to respond to and counteract foreign substances in the body, but have been increasingly used to specifically target cancer.

“This grant will allow us to identify lead antibodies and test their potency in pre-clinical models of metastatic cancer,” says Dr. Craig. “We will strive to secure the additional funding and partners that will be needed to translate these tools into new immunotherapies for clinical trials in human cancer patients.”

This grant, made possible by donations to the CCS, has attracted new post-doctoral fellows and graduate students to Dr. Craig’s research team.

“Being able to develop and maintain a strong research-intensive atmosphere is another extremely important part of receiving this grant support,” says Dr. Craig. “The opportunities for collaboration as a result of bringing in new researchers is invaluable to tackling this challenging disease.”

This funding was provided by the Canadian Cancer Society Innovation Grants program.

Funding fuels cancer research

Published Mon Jan 26/15 11:00am.

With an eye on improving survival rates and the quality of care for cancer patients, the Canada Foundation for Innovation has awarded the NCIC Clinical Trials Group (NCIC CTG) $3.8 million as part of its Major Science Initiatives.

The funding provides infrastructure support to the NCIC CTG operations and statistics office at Queen’s University.

“We are grateful CFI has pledged its support for our mission of conducting important clinical trials that allow cancer patients from across the country to access some of the most cutting-edge cancer treatments available,” says NCIC CTG director Janet Dancey.

The objective of the funding is to provide CFI funded, state-of-the-art research facilities, enabling researchers to undertake world-class research and technology development. The funding also provides governance and management oversight of these facilities.

“We undoubtedly have all been touched, one way or another, by cancer and are well aware of the impact it has on our lives and the lives of others,” says Steven Liss, Vice-Principal (Research). “The advances in prevention, diagnostics and treatment have been truly remarkable, but there is still much to do. This support from CFI will allow the NCIC Clinical Trials Group at Queen's University to provide the leadership and platform to further their critical role in advancing and implementing new approaches to diagnostics, clinical interventions and new treatments for cancer patients.”

The NCIC CTG possesses expertise and infrastructure to conduct national and international multicentre phase I-III cancer clinical trials aimed at improving the survival and quality of life of cancer patients. The funding will support cancer investigators across the country and provide them access to novel and comprehensive information technology, expertise in regulatory, ethics, safety, and on-site monitoring requirements necessary to ensure trials are compliant with Health Canada regulations.

Since its establishment in 1980, the NCIC CTG has conducted 492 trials enrolling more than 77,000 patients. The trials have led to the development and adoption of numerous cancer therapies that have improved the survival and quality of life for cancer patients and delivered a tremendous benefit to thousands of Canadians.

For more information visit the website.

Music Therapy with Hospice and Palliative Care

Published Fri Jan 23/15 3:00pm.
Presented by: Mackenzie Costron, BMT
Music Therapist and Owner of Find Your Voice Music Therapy

0800-0900
January 30, 2015
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. To understand what music therapy is and how it enhances health and wellness
2. To discuss the intentional and purposeful application of music therapy techniques and interventions in hospice and palliative care
3. To explore the benefits of music therapy in hospice and palliative care

Flyer attached here

Cutting-edge technology comes to Medicine & DBMS

Published Wed Jan 21/15 11:00am.

Eight researchers at Queen’s University have been awarded $1.3 million through the Canada Foundation for Innovation’s (CFI) John R. Evans Leaders Fund. Among them are two researchers from the Faculty of Health Sciences: Stephen Archer (Cardiology) and Neil Renwick (Pathology and Molecular Medicine).

Dr. Archer is using his funding to purchase a new super resolution microscope that can see structures five times smaller than any prior light microscopes.

“This new system, one of the very few in Canada, is to imaging the cell what the Hubble Space Telescope was to imaging the solar system,” says Dr. Archer, who received $400,000 and is also funded by the Henderson Foundation. “The microscope will be used to study how and why mitochondria divide and join together. Mitochondria play a key role in diseases including lung cancer and PAH.”

Dr. Renwick is focusing on cancer diagnostics.

“The goal of my CFI project is to transform cancer diagnostics using novel approaches,” says Dr. Renwick who received $200,000. “Through the vision of the CFI, I will purchase advanced instrumentation that will allow us to profile ribonucleic acid, a molecule that carries genetic information, and visualize diseased tissues. I expect these approaches will help pathologists to diagnose and classify cancers, recommend treatments, and predict clinical outcomes at the time of specimen assessment.”

“This CFI funding, which supports the acquisition or development of new infrastructure, provides the resources to sustain world-class research and the tools to pave the way for new and innovative discoveries at Queen’s,” says Steven Liss, Vice-Principal (Research). “Our success in this recent competition across a broad range of disciplines is indicative of the leadership of our researchers in their respective fields.”

Putting the school of medicine under the microscope

Published Tue Jan 20/15 2:00pm.

Every eight years, each Canadian medical school must earn accreditation in order to maintain its status. It is a peer-review process that is designed to ensure that medical students are receiving high quality education that meets the standards set across North America. Administered by the Committee on Accreditation of Canadian Medical Schools (CACMS) and the American counterpart, Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME), accreditation is a rigorous process wherein our teaching programs are reviewed in detail, our teaching sites are inspected and analyzed, and our medical school and its undergraduate education office are put under the microscope.

The Queen’s School of Medicine’s eight-year accreditation visit will happen in 2015, starting on March 29 and ending on April 1. In preparation for this visit, the school must complete an Institutional Self Study which includes an Independent Student Analysis in addition to preparing a Medical Education Database that addresses each of the accreditation standards which fall under one of five categories: Institutional Setting, Education Program leading to the MD Degree, Medical Students, Faculty Affairs, and Educational Resources.

As we approach the accreditation visit in March, I would like to recognize the hard work of John Drover, Tony Sanfilippo, Catherine Isaacs, Amanda Consack and the many other staff, students and faculty members who have been playing an integral role in preparing the School of Medicine for this important milestone.

The students have been and will continue to be a vital part of the process. Many students have spent countless hours not only preparing documents for the accreditation submission, but have given freely of their time and creative abilities to make the educational experience better for themselves and their peers and the many students who will follow in their path. Our students are exceptional and deserve high praise for the work they are doing.

To give you a sense of the breadth of the work and coordination involved, here is an accreditation visit “by-the-numbers”:

18 months of preparation
128 accreditation standards
7 committees struck in preparation for accreditation, each consisting of at least 10 members
1 committee of students for the Independent Student Analysis
6 visitors from the accrediting bodies (5 from CACMS, 1 from LCME)
80 faculty members to be interviewed
18 Department Heads to be interviewed
5 hospital CEOS to be interviewed
30 students and residents to be interviewed
Thousands of pages of material

And we are not done. There will be documentation to be completed and submitted; there will many meetings with students, staff and faculty in preparation for the visit; and further communication to come about details of the preparation and details for the visit.

While accreditation represents a tremendous amount of work, time and effort, it serves a very important function for a medical school: continuous quality improvement. Rather than wait 7 years and 364 days until the next accreditation visit and rush to evaluate ourselves and make changes, we have shifted towards a “culture” of accreditation whereby we are constantly monitoring our compliance to standards. In the end, this means that we are regularly improving the caliber of medical education that we deliver, to the benefit of our faculty members, our students and their future patients.

Queen's Health Policy Change Conference Series

Published Mon Jan 19/15 1:00pm.

Managing a Canadian Healthcare Strategy is the third in a series of three focused annual conferences, presented by Queen’s University, to initiate transformational change in Canadian healthcare.

Crafting a national strategy for Canada’s complex, multi-jurisdictional system requires a multi-faceted perspective, clarity, and a desire among our leadership to collaborate, and the will to act.

Each conference draws approximately 150 senior-level participants from healthcare, government, academe and business. Nearly 4 in 10 attendees have been panelists or keynote speakers; participants have engaged with executives, government and thought leaders from eight nations germane to Canada’s system. Read more...

Caring for a troubled world

Published Mon Jan 19/15 1:00pm.

Emergency room doctors and their staff work are on the front lines of health care, addressing the urgent needs of patients with everything from critical illness and injury to the routine afflictions of daily life. They’re experts at triage and decision-making in a fast-moving, unpredictable environment.

Susan Bartels, an emergency room physician in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Queen’s and a clinician scientist at Kingston General Hospital, adapts that expertise to a different kind of front-line care in some of the most troubled regions of the globe.

As a specialist in global health, she looks at what happens to people during wars and natural disasters, delivering not just urgent care, but also documenting and reporting on the complex, long-term, and often invisible consequences of those events on individuals, families and communities.

A graduate of Memorial University who completed her residency at Queen’s, Dr. Bartels returned to Kingston last September from Boston, where she worked for seven years after  completing a fellowship in international emergency medicine at the Harvard Medical School and a master’s degree at the Harvard School of Public Health.

During that time she became director of the Global Health and International Emergency Medicine Fellowship at Boston’s Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School. She also gained extensive experience as a faculty member with the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative, taking part in international aid missions in the U.S., Africa and the Middle East – work she continues to do through her new position at KGH and Queen’s.      

Some of her most significant experience has been in Central Africa, where her work has addressed issues such as drought, cholera, mortality, and war crimes. She also led two studies in the Democratic Republic of Congo, documenting women’s health and sexual violence as a weapon of war. The latter work has been groundbreaking because it provides a quantitative assessment of the long-term effects of sexual violence, such as abandonment by spouses, and abuse and social stigmatization of children born from these assaults.

More recently she has been focusing on child protection and the effects of the civil war on Syrian refugees in neighbouring Lebanon, including social isolation, missed schooling, forced child labour and child marriage. Through interviews with families she is building a picture of the long-term challenges faced by families misplaced by the conflict. Such documentation, Dr. Bartels says, helps to improve the science and practice of delivering humanitarian aid. “It’s about looking at the effects of war and finding ways to mitigate the impact.”

Amid the bleakness of the environments in which she works, however, she finds reasons for hope. “I am looking at resilience in this context, and how people have overcome adversity. It’s intriguing – what is it that allows people to overcome such terrible events and grow? What are the building blocks in individuals, families, and communities that we could foster or augment to help them rebuild?”

This story is the fifth in a series on the KGH Research Institute, a collaboration between Queen’s and Kingston General Hospital, and the clinician-scientists recruited to work in the centre.

Burnout in Palliative Care

Published Mon Jan 19/15 12:00pm.
Presented by; Dr. Craig Goldie

0800-0900
Friday January 16, 2015
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. Review the frequency of burnout in palliative care
2. Discuss some aggravating and protective habits and practices
3. Talk as a group about how we are doing/what we could do better

Flyer attached here.
Presentation slides attached here.

Ageing and Dying in Prison: Out of Sight, Out of Mind

Published Mon Jan 19/15 12:00pm.
Presented by: Dr. Chris Frank

0800-0900
Friday January 23, 2015
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. Consider opportunities to improve end of life care for people in prison
2. Consider advocacy roles for palliative care in prisons

Flyer attached here.
Podcast of the CBC interview: 

http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/podcasts/tapestry_20141205_28377.mp3

Weaving Together Concepts and Tools to Operationalize CBME in Palliative Care Medicine

Published Mon Jan 19/15 11:45am.
Presentated by: Laura McEwen, PhD & Dr. Ingrid Harle

0800-0900
Friday December 19, 2014
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. Explore the Competency by Design initiative, including changes in CanMEDS 2015 and the role of Milestones and Entrustable Professinal Activity (EPAs)
2. Appreciate the role of assessment as the backbone of CBME
3. Consider potential EPAs for Palliative Medicine

Flyer attached here.

Prescribing Palliative Care Medication from the Pharmacy Perspective

Published Mon Jan 19/15 11:00am.
Presented by: Brent Schneider, RPh, BSP, MSc

0800-0900
December 12, 2014
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. Review what happens after we write a CADD prescription from pharmacy perspective
2. Common errors in Palliative Care prescription writing
3. Tips from a pharmacy perspective


Flyer attached here.



Weaving Together Concepts and Tools to Operationalize CBME in Palliative Care Medicine

Published Mon Jan 19/15 11:00am.
Presentated by: Laura McEwen, PhD & Dr. Ingrid Harle

0800-0900
Friday December 19, 2014
Host site: 36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. Explore the Competency by Design initiative, including changes in CanMEDS 2015 and the role of Milestones and Entrustable Professinal Activity (EPAs)
2. Appreciate the role of assessment as the backbone of CBME
3. Consider potential EPAs for Palliative Medicine

Flyer attached here.

Geography's 'Place' in Palliative care Research

Published Mon Jan 19/15 11:00am.
Presented by: Dr. Heather Castleden, Associate Professor

0800-0900
Friday January 9, 2015
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. To introduce the sub-discipline of health geography to the field of palliative care research
2. To demonstrate the application of a health geography lens to sitting palliative care facilities
3. To use social and physical place as an analytic tool to elucidate issues central to rural and aboriginal palliative care

Flyer attached here.

Burnout in Palliative Care

Published Mon Jan 19/15 11:00am.
Presented by; Dr. Craig Goldie

0800-0900
Friday January 16, 2015
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. Review the frequency of burnout in palliative care
2. Discuss some aggravating and protective habits and practices
3. Talk as a group about how we are doing/what we could do better

Flyer attached here.
Presentation slides attached here.

Professional Foundations Course Directorship

Published Thu Jan 15/15 8:00am.
Although Dr. Susan MacDonald has been very capably filling this role, it’s become clear that it raises a potential conflict with her role as Academic Advisor, in that students may be reluctant to voluntarily seek her help for academic difficulties is she holds any evaluative role.  Given the very difficult choice of how best to use Susan’s skills, I’ve opted to ask her to concentrate on the Academic Advisor role, which she pioneered and in which she has quietly made tremendous contributions to the development and success of many of our students.  She will, of course, continue to teach and participate actively in non-evaluative aspects of the PF course.  On an interim basis, Dr. Michelle Gibson has agreed to take on the PF Course Directorship.  Michelle’s great familiarity with that course and its administration will be invaluable.  I’m very grateful to both Susan and Michelle.

 

Tony Sanfilippo

Associate Dean

Undergraduate Medical Education

Inviting comments on the Centre for Studies in Primary Care

Published Mon Jan 12/15 1:00pm.

Advisory Review Committee established for the Centre for Studies in Primary Care (CSPC)

In accordance with the Senate Policy on Procedures Governing the Establishment, Reporting and Review of Research Centres, Institutes and other Entities at Queen’s University, Dr. Roger Deeley, Vice Dean (Research), Faculty of Health Sciences is pleased to announce the membership of the Advisory Review Committee for the Centre for Studies in Primary Care. The committee comprises:

  • Dr. John Fisher – CHAIR of the Advisory Review Committee; Director of Research, Faculty of Health Sciences, Queen’s University
  • Dr. Marcia Finlayson, Vice-Dean (Health Sciences) and Director, School of Rehabilitation Therapy, Queen’s University
  • Dr. Sudeep Gill, Associate Professor, Departments of Medicine and Public Health Sciences, Queen’s University;
  • Dr. Geoffrey Hodgetts, Professor, Department of Family Medicine, Queen’s University; and
  • Dr. Eva Grunfeld, Giblon Professor and Vice-Chair Research, Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto

To assist with the review, faculty, staff, students and members of the University community are invited to submit their comments to the committee on the present state and future prospects of the Centre by February 6th, 2016. Please send to:

Chair, CSPC Advisory Review Committee

c/o Gladys Smith
Health Sciences Research Office
Queen’s University
Ste300-CRI, 10 Stuart Street
Kingston, ON K7L 3N6
or by e-mail to Gladys.Smith@queensu.ca.

Submissions will be shared only with the members of the Review Committee and will become part of the review process; anonymous submission will not be accepted.

Three new chairs take their seats

Published Thu Jan 08/15 3:00pm.

Three brand new chair positions in the Faculty of Health Sciences have been filled by esteemed leaders in the fields of health policy, surgery and ophthalmology.

Michael Green (Public Health Sciences, Family Medicine) has been appointed the Clinical Teachers’ Association of Queen’s Chair in Applied Health Economics/Health Policy, John Rudan (Surgery) is the Britton Smith Chair in Surgery and Martin ten Hove (Ophthamology) is the Edna and Ernie Johnson Chair in Ophthamology.

For Dr. Green, the funds from this chair will support the development of new projects and engaging other clinical teachers in his area of research.

“I’m thrilled to have this opportunity to help increase the capacity for applied health services and policy research here at Queen’s,” says Dr. Green. “I plan to build on my work examining the impact of new models of funding and organizing primary care on both cost and outcomes, as well as the differential impact of these changes for specific population groups including Aboriginal peoples.”

Dr. Green has been a faculty member at Queen’s since 1995. He has also served as a consultant for both the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care and Health Canada.

Dr. Rudan (Artsci’76, Meds’81) is currently serving his second term as head of the Department of Surgery. “The generosity of this gift facilitates our ability to translate great science into surgical practise to benefit our patients,” says Dr. Rudan.

Dr. Rudan was a leader in the creation of the Clinical Mechanics Group, now known as the Human Mobility Research Centre (HMRC), at Queen's. He has either led or co-investigated studies involving more than $9 million in funding from sources including the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

He has served as the vice-chair of the orthopaedics oral examination committee for the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and as vice-president and president of the Clinical Teachers’ Association at Queen's.

Dr. ten Hove (Meds’89) is an associate professor and head of the Department of Ophthalmology.

“Being appointed the first recipient of the Edna and Ernie Johnson Chair in Ophthalmology is a true honour,” says Dr. ten Hove. “As a well-respected Department of Ophthalmology for more than 50 years, we are very proud of this named chair and will use it to establish ourselves as a national leader in advancing vision science and vision care.”

Dr. ten Hove is an active researcher in the area of the neural mechanisms underlying visual attention and has served on the examination committee of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and on the Royal College’s specialty committee for ophthalmology.

Meds alumni named to the Order of Canada

Published Thu Jan 08/15 3:00pm.

Four Queen’s alumni – from the fields of medicine, politics and media – have been appointed to the Order of Canada.

Dr. Brenda Gallie (Meds'69) is an ophthalmologist at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto who has conducted groundbreaking research on the genetics of retinoblastoma, a rare cancer of children’s eyes. 

Dr. Norman Marcon (Meds'62) is a doctor and researcher at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto. He is being honored for his work on gastrointestinal diseases and promoting the latest advances in therapeutic endoscopy.

Peter Milliken (Arts'68, LLD'12), appointed as an Officer, the second highest rank of the Order of Canada, is the longest-serving Speaker of the House and former MP for Kingston and the Islands. 

Michael MacMillan (Artsci'78) founded Atlantis Films in 1978. The company won an Oscar (1984 short film Boys and Girls) and an Emmy before acquiring Alliance Communications. The company ran 13 TV networks – including HGTV Canada, History Television and the Food Network – before he retired. He co-authored the book of Tragedy in the Commons: Former Members of Parliament Speak Out About Canada’s Failing Democracy and founded Samara Canada, a non-profit organization designed to get Canadians more engaged with politics.

Governor General David Johnston (Law’66, LLD’91) recently announced 95 new appointments to the Order of Canada, one of the nation’s highest civilian honours. The receipts will be honoured at a ceremony later this year in Ottawa.

Resident Safety and Travel

Published Mon Jan 05/15 2:00pm.
As winter weather has arrived, residents are reminded that their personal safety and travel is covered in the Resident Health and Safety policy.  Section 5 of the policy covers safety and travel and includes the following points:

5.7 - A resident may elect not to attend their academic half-day, clinic, etc. if in his/her estimation, it would not be safe to travel because of weather.

5.7.1- The resident must inform the appropriate person as soon as possible of absences due to inclement weather.

The entire policy can be viewed online.

Happy New Year

Published Mon Jan 05/15 10:00am.
The Postgraduate Medical Education Office would like to wish all of our residents and clinical fellows a very happy New Year.  As a reminder, our office is open Monday-Friday from 8:30am-4:30pm.  We are closed over the lunch hour from 12-1pm.  Please drop by if there's anything we can help you with.  You may also reach us by phone at 533-2543 or by email at pgme@queensu.ca.

School of Medicine Building recognized with award

Published Wed Dec 17/14 2:00pm.

Queen’s recently received awards for two of its new buildings – the School of Medicine Building picked up an Award of Merit in the City of Kingston’s Livable City Design Awards while the Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts was recognized by the Frontenac Heritage Foundation at the 2014 Heritage Conservation Awards.

The Livable City Design Award highlighted the way the School of Medicine Building creates an “effective transition between the Sydenham Heritage Conservation District and the university campus.” The jury also pointed to the preservation of two heritage buildings on Barrie Street that were incorporated into the new structure.

Designed by Diamond Schmitt Architects in Toronto and in concert with local architects Shoalts and Zaback Architects, it was built by local construction firm M. Sullivan and Son Limited and opened in fall 2011.

The beauty of the building is in the details, points out Yvonne Holland, Director of Campus Planning for Queen’s.

“The architects designed an accessibility elevator that they installed in between the old and the new,” she says. “You can’t even see it from the street but it’s wonderfully designed. A lot of the historic features were restored and reconstructed to match the original appearance. It really is a fabulous state-of-the-art, 21st century facility that also respects the fact that it is in a deeply-historic area of our city.”


Ms. Holland says that while the design of the building respects the historic nature of the area it also provides a high-tech and contemporary facility for students, faculty and researchers. She also points out that the use of natural lighting creates an open feel and at night, with plenty of activity going on, the building lights up the whole corner, particularly in winter. The end product is something to be proud of, she says.

“I think from a project management perspective, nothing short of a Herculean effort was exercised here to make this happen,” she says. “This is not a conventional facility. This is a medical facility with labs and new teaching spaces, respecting the pedagogy that has changed of late.”

To the southwest, along Front Street, is the university’s newest addition – the Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts.

A visual splendour designed by internationally-renowned architecture firm Snohetta, the Isabel also combines cutting-edge design with the preservation of heritage. 

The award citation points to the conserving of limestone walls and multi-pane windows at the former Morton’s Brewery site.

“(Heritage) is a key element for us and for the city in which we are situated,” Ms. Holland says. “We have 88 historic facilities here, which is more per capita than anywhere else, so we absolutely respect that as part of the fabric of our city.”

Ms. Holland explains that the recently-completed Campus Master Plan took close to two years to complete and that these two buildings, and the awards they have now garnered, are a validation of the process.

“Hundreds of people were involved including the city and other key community stakeholders, so it wasn’t just an inward-looking process , it was very much an outward-looking process she says. “Both of these facilities support the plan. I just think they’re magnificent.”

Dr. Alberto Neder's research helps people breathe easier

Published Mon Dec 15/14 2:00pm.

Few of us would equate the household chore of vacuuming with quality of life. But for people with heart and lung disease, quality of life often comes down to having the breath, to carry out those simple, everyday tasks.

“There is a close relationship between your physical capacity and your quality of life,” says Alberto Neder, a Queen’s University respirologist and clinician scientist at the Kingston General Hospital Research Institute. “Shortness of breath has a huge impact on that quality of life.”

Born and educated in Brazil, Dr. Neder is a leading expert in exercise and respiratory physiology. He was recruited to Queen’s and the KGH Research Institute last year from the Federal University of Sao Paulo, where he was a full professor, head of the institution’s respiratory division, and founder of a rehabilitation centre for patients with chronic cardiac and lung disease.

Dr. Neder’s research focuses on the interactions of lungs, heart, blood and cells, with the goal of better understanding the mechanisms that cause the breathlessness associated with diseases such as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disorder (COPD) and congestive heart failure. His long-term goal is to improve his patients’ quality of life.

“We are interrogating the complex biological system that is the human body. We’re not looking at just one specific system, we’re looking at all of them, and how they work in an integrated manner,” he says. “And the best way to investigate these systems is when they are under the stress of physical exercise. It gives us information we can’t get when the body is at rest.”

To do this he has established the Laboratory of Clinical Exercise Physiology at Kingston General Hospital, the world’s first centre devoted to the study of the combination of lung-heart disease. Patients take part in physical activities such as riding a stationary bicycle or walking on a treadmill, enabling Dr. Neder and his team to monitor and assess the complete oxygen pathway through the body, from oxygen intake and blood distribution to the work done by their respiratory muscles.

“By looking at all of these interactions we can discover what’s going on in terms of insufficient oxygen to the tissues, and how it’s linked to the sensation of shortness of breath and general fatigue.”

Dr. Neder’s research asks potentially game-changing questions about treatments for this difficult disease combination, and he is currently recruiting patients for at least three innovative studies.  

One study assesses smokers with apparently normal lung function. The research aims to show, for the first time, early signs of COPD damage or malfunction to small lung vessels that are not apparent in conventional breathing tests. Currently little is known or done for those with COPD in its early, potentially reversible stages; this research could help to identify new treatments for early-stage COPD.

Another study, into congestive heart failure, explores the use of nitric oxide to improve blood flow to muscles including the heart and brain. Dr. Neder has begun the first randomized control study delivering concentrated beetroot juice, a natural nutrient that is rich in nitric oxide, to heart failure patients. “It has been used to enhance athletic performance, and now there’s the potential to use it as a health product,” he says.

“It’s about the benefits of keeping moving,” says Dr. Neder. “It makes a lot of difference, especially when you get older.”

Implications of Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators (ICDs) in Palliative Care Patient

Published Tue Dec 02/14 9:00am.
Presenter: Dr. Jaimi Heidman, Palliative Medicine PGY3

0800-0900
Friday December 5, 2014
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:

1. Examine important issues surrounding the use of ICDs in palliative care patients

2. Identify factors that influence decisions on ICD deactivation

3. Discuss an approach to discuss goals of care and patient wishes regarding continued ICD use vs deactivation

Flyer attached here.

Physician Hastened Death: Spiritual Considerations

Published Fri Nov 21/14 11:00am.
Presenter: Neil Elford

DMin, CASC Teaching Supervisor (PCE/CPE), Director for Spiritual Health, Mission and Ethics

0800-0900
Friday November 28, 2014
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:

  • Exploration of what influences spiritual considerations
  • Discussion about spiritual considerations in conversations with patients and their loved ones
  • Identifying spiritual distress in health care providers
  • Recommendations for clinical practice
Flyer attached.
Presentation slides attached here.

Systemic Therapies for Treatment of Cancer

Published Fri Nov 14/14 2:00pm.
Presenter: Dr. Deb Dudgeon

0800-0900
Friday November 21, 2014
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. To describe the different therapies available for the treatment of cancers
2. To describe the mechanisms of action
3. To outline possible toxicities related to the therapies

Flyer attached here.
Sign-in sheet attached here



Systemic Therapies for Treatment of Cancer

Published Fri Nov 14/14 2:00pm.
Presenter: Dr. Deb Dudgeon

0800-0900
Friday November 21, 2014
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. To describe the different therapies available for the treatment of cancers
2. To describe the mechanisms of action
3. To outline possible toxicities related to the therapies

Flyer attached here.

Hypnosis in Clinical Care

Published Tue Nov 11/14 12:00pm.
Presenter: Dr. David Goldstein
Associate Professor
Department of Anesthesiology & Perioperative Medicine
Queen's University

0800-0900
Friday November 14, 2014
36 Barrie Street

Flyer attached here.

Refeeding Syndrome - Are you in the know?

Published Wed Oct 29/14 3:00pm.
Presented by: Lyndsay Glazier RD, Kim Gough RD, Cathy Renda-Moore Rd

0800-0900
Friday October 31, 2014
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. To increase awareness of refeeding syndrome in the oncology patient population
2. To be able to identify patients at risk
3. To know how to prevent and treat refeeding syndrome

Flyer attached here.

Breaking Bad News

Published Wed Oct 15/14 3:00pm.
Presented by: Dr. Ray Viola

0800-0900
Friday October 17, 2014
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. Describe models for communicating bad news

2. Identify situations when bad news is provided
3. Provide input into design of learning session for breaking bad news

Flyer attached here.
Presentation slides attached here    

Breaking Bad News

Published Wed Oct 15/14 3:00pm.
Presented by: Dr. Ray Viola

0800-0900
Friday October 17, 2014
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. Describe models for communicating bad news

2. Identify situations when bad news is provided
3. Provide input into design of learning session for breaking bad news

Flyer attached here.
Sign-in sheet attached here     
Presentation Slides attached here   

De-prescribing in Palliative Care

Published Tue Sep 30/14 2:00pm.
Presented by: Dr. Natalie Kondor

0800-0900
Friday Oct 3, 2014
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:

1. To discuss possible reasons for over-prescription in palliative care patients
2. To examine the rationale behind de-prescribing
3. To review tools to help optimize the use of pharmaceuticals in palliative care

Flyer attached here.

Art Therapy: Exploring its role in Palliative Care

Published Thu Sep 25/14 10:00am.
Presented by: Dr. Saneea Abboud, Palliative Medicine PGY3

0800-0900
Friday September 26, 2014
36 Barrie Street

In this session, you will be able to:
1. Describe art therapy
2. Explain the potential benefits of art therapy for palliative care patients
3. Provide input into the design of a project to examine art therapy in palliative care

Flyer attached here.

Basmajian Award Presentation and Lecture on October 2, 2014

Published Tue Sep 23/14 10:00pm.
FACULTY OF HEALTH SCIENCES
2013/2014 MIHRAN AND MARY BASMAJIAN AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN HEALTH RESEARCH
Presentation and Lecture

 

OCTOBER 2, 2014 - 5pm
School of Medicine Building, Room 032A, 15 Arch St.

 

DR. CHANDRAKANT TAYADE, DVM, MVSc., PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences
 
Targeting Immune-Angiogenesis Axis in Endometriosis
 

Dr. Chandra Tayade is an Associate Professor in the Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences at Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. Dr. Tayade received his DVM (Doctor of Veterinary Medicine) from Nagpur Veterinary College and PhD from Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar, India.  He completed postdoctoral training with Dr. Anne Croy at the University of Guelph in reproductive immunology.  In 2009, he was appointed to a tenure-track faculty position at Queen’s University.

Dr. Tayade’s research is focused on understanding the pathophysiology of endometriosis.  His laboratory is investigating specific mechanisms supporting new blood vessel growth in endometriosis that can be safely targeted using anti-angiogenic therapies.  He has established a mouse xenogenic engraftment model and is validating the efficacy of several anti-angiogenic compounds.  His research group currently has 4 PhD Students, 1 Postdoctoral Fellow and 3 undergraduate students.  Dr. Tayade’s research is supported by funding from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council, the Canada Foundation for Innovation, and the Ministry of Research and Innovation as well as industrial awards from Bioniche Life Sciences, Inc. and Ontario Pork.

Dr. Tayade is recipient of the 2011 J. Christian Herr Award from the American Society for Reproductive Immunology for outstanding research contribution.  In 2012, he received an Early Researcher Award from the Ontario Ministry of Economic Development and Innovation for his work on anti-angiogenic therapy in endometriosis.

Participate in Canadian Patient Safety Week

Published Tue Sep 23/14 12:00pm.

Enter the 2014 Room of Horrors

Is your patient safe? Are you safe? Increase your awareness of patient and provider safety by participating in the annual Health Sciences “Room of Horrors” evening. Work with an Interprofessional team to identify potentially harmful events in a clinical simulation - and win prizes! Complete form at this link to register

October 27th, 2014 4:30 – 6:00 pm (30 minute sessions)
Faculty of Health Sciences Patient Simulation Labs, Cataraqui Building, 92 Barrie St.

More Information...

CEHPEA Symposium 2015

Published Thu Sep 18/14 2:00pm.
Perspectives in Competency Assessment

Centre for the Evaluation of Health Professionals Educated Abroad (CEHPEA) invites you to join us for a day of engaging discussions around competency assessment.

We are pleased to announce that registration is now open for our 2015 symposium, Perspectives in Competency Assessment. Join us on February 5, 2015, at the MaRS Collaboration Centre in Toronto, Canada, for an enriching day of interprofessional learning and development.
Featured presenters:
·         Dr. Cees van der Vleuten, School of Health Professions Education, Maastricht University
·         Dr. Bob Bell, Deputy Minister of Health and Long-Term Care
·         Dr. Geoff Norman, Program for Educational Research and Development, McMaster University
·         Dr. Zubin Austin, Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto
·         Dr. Ivy Oandasan, Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto

Joining us for panel discussions and other sessions:
·         Dr. Ivy Lynn Bourgeault, Telfer School of Management and Institute of Population Health, University of Ottawa
·         Dr. Andrea Baumann, School of Nursing, McMaster University
·         Dr. Debra Sibbald, Centre for the Evaluation of Health Professionals Educated Abroad
·         Dr. Patricia Bradley, School of Nursing, York University
·         Nuzhat Jafri, Office of the Fairness Commissioner
·         Kevin Taylor, College of Respiratory Therapists of Ontario
·         Dr. Murray Urowitz, Centre for the Evaluation of Health Professionals Educated Abroad

Register now: Registration is open until November 14, 2014. Rates for all participants are CAD 450.
Visit us online: Browse the full program and speaker details at www.perspectives2015.com
 

20th International Congress on Palliative Care - What I Learned in Montreal

Published Mon Sep 15/14 2:00pm.
Presenters: Dr. Craig Goldie, Dr. Deb Dudgeon, Suzanne Jensen & Dr. Ray Viola

0800-0900 
Friday September 19, 2014
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. Hear about and discuss learning highlights from the Congress as identified by 4 participants
2. Discover 4 restaurants to try the next time you visit Montreal

Flyer attached here
Sign-in sheet Attached here

20th International Congress on Palliative Care - What I Learned in Montreal

Published Mon Sep 15/14 2:00pm.
Presenters: Dr. Craig Goldie, Dr. Deb Dudgeon, Suzanne Jensen & Dr. Ray Viola

0800-0900 
Friday September 19, 2014
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. Hear about and discuss learning highlights from the Congress as identified by 4 participants
2. Discover 4 restaurants to try the next time you visit Montreal

Flyer attached here

Assessing Quality of Palliative Home Care Interventions

Published Wed Sep 10/14 11:00am.
Presented by: Ryan Pardy, 4th year Bachelor of Science candidate (Life Science Major), Queen's University, TVN Summer Student Award Recipient (2014)

0800-0900
Friday September 12, 2014
36 Barrie Street

After this round, you will:
1. Understand the trade-offs involved in evaluations of palliative home care services.
2. Be able to describe key quality of palliative home care themes from the perspective of patients and informal caregivers.
3. Be able to compare these themes with the goals identified for the Ontario health care system

Flyer attached here.

Surgical Update for Primary Care Physicians

Published Fri Sep 05/14 3:00pm.
Join the Department of Surgery at Lakeridge Health, in partnership with Queen's University, for the first of its Surgical Education Series, specially designed for family physicians, surgical staff, and related healthcare providers.   It will take place on Thursday, October 16, 2014 from 5:30-9:00pm.  Download the flyer and visit www.lhearnsurgery.ca to register.

Caring for the Palliative Care Patient with Multiple Sclerosis

Published Fri Sep 05/14 11:00am.
Presented by: Dr. Jaimi Heidman, Palliative Medicine PGY3

0800-0900
September 5, 2014
36 Barrie Street

At the end of this round you will be able to:
1 List the common physical emotional and psychosocial issues experienced by patients with multiple sclerosis (MS)
2. Manage symptoms frequently experienced by patients with MS

Flyer attached here.

Postgraduate Annual Report

Published Tue Sep 02/14 10:00am.
The Postgraduate Medical Education Annual Report for 2013-2014 is now available.  The report is available in an online format this year, and can be viewed at:  http://meds.queensu.ca/education/postgraduate/annual_report

Summer Resident Newsletter

Published Tue Aug 19/14 11:00am.
The Summer 2014 Resident Newsletter has been distributed.  If you haven't received your copy, an online version is available here:  http://eepurl.com/0u-yz

IRLS 2014

Published Tue Jul 22/14 9:00am.
Residents play a critical leadership role in postgraduate medical education. Entering its sixth year, the International Resident Leadership Summit (IRLS) is an extension one of the International Conference on Residency Education (ICRE). The summit is one of Canada’s premier resident development events, a two-day conference dedicated to supporting present and future resident leaders. The IRLS will be held on October 25-26, 2014 and further information is available from the ICRE website.  Early registration ends Sept 15!

Non-invasive Ventilation: A Role in Palliative Care?

Published Thu Jul 10/14 12:00pm.
Presented by: Dr. Ingrid Harle

0800-0900
Friday June 13, 2014
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. Review the mechanics of non-invasive ventilation
2. Review technical considerations of NIV
3. Evaluate the role of NIV in providing palliative care to our patients

Flyer attached.
Presentation slides attached.

James Low, six alumni named to Order of Canada

Published Wed Jul 09/14 2:00pm.

Queen’s University emeritus professor James Low has been named a member of the Order of Canada for his contributions as an academic and as the founder of the Museum of Health Care.

The award is the second highest honour of merit in Canada and is given to those who make a major difference in Canada through lifelong contributions in their field.

“The award is actually more for the museum than for me,” says the ever-humble Dr. Low, who has volunteered at the museum since it opened as a non-profit institution in 1991, served as its executive director until the end of 2012, and now works as its advancement officer. “We have created a unique cultural resource.”

James Low poses with one of the only remaining original iron lungs used at Sick Children's Hospital in 1937.

Dr. Low was also the head of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Queen’s from 1965 to 1985.

“This is the only mission-specific museum of health care in Canada,” says Dr. Low. “We have two missions: develop a complete collection highlighting all health care disciplines, and tell the health care story to enhance public understanding. The past is the foundation on which the present is built. Preserving the health care legacy is important.”

In his role as advancement Officer, Dr Low works with the museum's Board of Directors to find new patrons and donors which help preserve the museum's history.

“James Low has contributed greatly to Queen’s University and its medical program since coming to Kingston nearly 50 years ago,” says Principal Daniel Woolf. “Earning the Order of Canada is a true honour and rewards the years Dr. Low spent establishing the Museum of Health Care, the only one of its kind in Canada.”

Six Queen’s alumni were also appointed to the Order of Canada. Named as officers of the order are:

Harold Jennings, OC,  MSc’61, PhD’64 (Chemistry), Distinguished Research Scientist, National Research Council of Canada,  for his contributions to carbohydrate chemistry, notably in the development of a pediatric vaccine used internationally to prevent the most common strain of meningitis.

Veena Rawat, OC, PhD’73 (Electrical Engineering), past president of the Communications Research Centre, for her contributions to telecommunications engineering and for her leadership in establishing the global regulatory framework for radio spectrum management.

Shirley Tilghman, OC, Artsci’68 (Chemistry),  DSc’02, a molecular biologist and past president of Princeton University,  for her contributions to molecular biology, for her leadership in university education and for her influential efforts to champion women in science and engineering.

Named as members of the order are:

Jim Leech, CM, MBA’73,  former president and CEO of the Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan and current Queen’s chancellor, for his contributions as an innovator in pension management, for his writings on the subject of retirement funding, and for his community involvement.

Bruce McNiven, CM,  Artsci’76 (History), lawyer and founding member and treasurer of the Trudeau Foundation, for his broad and sustained commitment to the preservation and flourishing of Montreal culture and heritage.

Donna Stewart, CM, Meds’67, chair of women’s health for the University Health Network and U of T, for her contributions to women’s health as a nationally renowned leader in the field.

Head, Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine

Published Mon Jun 30/14 1:00pm.
Queen’s University and Affiliated Teaching Hospitals

Applications are invited for the position of Head of the Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine at Queen’s University and its fully affiliated teaching hospitals, Hotel Dieu Hospital, Kingston General Hospital and Providence Care. We are searching for an academic physician with proven administrative experience and leadership skills who, as Head, will develop and manage teams that will foster continuing excellence in teaching, patient care and research within the Department and the region. The qualified applicant must be eligible for licensure in Ontario.

Encompassing the five divisions of Anatomic Pathology, Hematopathology, Genetics, Clinical Microbiology and Clinical Chemistry, the Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine has comprehensive programs in education, research and clinical care. With more than 50 departmental faculty, the Department is engaged in teaching laboratory medicine and the pathogenesis of disease; training the next generation of biomedical research scientists and laboratory physicians; conducting basic and translational research, including gene expression profiling, which advances the understanding and treatment of disease; and delivering diagnostic services and clinical programs to the people of southeastern Ontario. The Department currently has in excess of $4.5M in research grant funding. Further information may be obtained by visiting the Department’s web site at http://www.path.queensu.ca/.

Applications and nominations, the former to be accompanied by a letter summarizing leadership and administrative experience, a curriculum vitae and the names and full contact information of three referees, are to be directed to: Drs. Richard Reznick and John Leverette, Search Committee Co-Chairs, c/o Mrs. Gail Knutson, Faculty of Health Sciences, Macklem House, Queen’s University, 18 Barrie Street, Kingston, Ontario, Canada, K7L 3N6 or by e-mail to gail.knutson@queensu.ca. Review of applications and nominations will commence in mid-September and will continue until the position is filled. Support to applicants with disabilities, including accommodation that takes into account an applicant’s accessibility needs, will be provided in the recruitment processes. If you require accommodation during the interview process, please contact Mrs. Knutson.
One of Canada’s leading universities, Queen’s has a long-standing reputation for academic excellence, research and a diverse and vibrant
learning environment. With its strong tradition of public service, the University has helped to shape Canadian values and policies, educating notable political and cultural figures.
Queen’s University is located in the heart of the community in historic Kingston, midpoint between Montreal Toronto and Ottawa, the nation’s capital.
www.queensu.ca/humanresources

The University and Hospitals are committed to employment equity and diversity in the workplace and welcome applications from women, visible minorities, Aboriginal people, persons with disabilities, and persons of any sexual orientation or gender identity. All qualified candidates are invited to apply; however, Canadian citizens and permanent residents will be given priority.

Delirium

Published Fri Jun 20/14 9:00am.
Presented by: Kevin Varley, HBSc, MD, FRCPC
Director of Consultation Liaison Psychiatry Service

0800-0900
Friday June 27, 2014
36 Barrie Street

Learning objectives:
1. To explore the approaches to delirium in psychiatry and palliative care and learn from each other in a small group forum
2. To discuss recognition and treatment of delirium

Flyer attached here.

The Development of a Goals-of-Care Discussion Resource for Hospitalized Patients

Published Fri Jun 20/14 8:00am.
Presented by: Dr. Neil Bellack, Family Medicine Resident PGY2

0800-0900
Friday Jun 20, 2014
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. Review the rationale for developing a tool to improve communication with patients in hospital
2. Describe the new resources available in Kingston General Hospital to facilitate goals-of-care discussions

Flyer attached here.  
Sign-in sheet and Evaluation Form attached.
Presentation slides and handout (Goals of Care Discussion Tool) Attached.

The Development of a Goals-of-Care Discussion Resource for Hospitalized Patients

Published Thu Jun 19/14 9:00am.
Presented by: Dr. Neil Bellack, Family Medicine Resident PGY2

0800-0900
Friday Jun 20, 2014
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. Review the rationale for developing a tool to improve communication with patients in hospital
2. Describe the new resources available in Kingston General Hospital to facilitate goals-of-care discussions

Flyer attached here.
Presentation slides and handout (Goals fo Care Discussion Tool) attached

Resident Advisory Committee Updates

Published Wed Jun 18/14 4:00pm.
Your Resident Advisory Committe has been working hard this term and is pleased to provide you with the following updates:  http://meds.queensu.ca/education/postgraduate/residents/rac

Online Registration

Published Wed Jun 18/14 2:00pm.
The Postgraduate online registration system will be temporarily unavailable on Wednesday, June 18th.  We apologize for any inconvenience and would ask you to check back later in order to register.

test

Published Tue Jun 10/14 10:00am.
test announcements

Using mobile phones to fight malaria in Tanzania

Published Fri May 30/14 11:00pm.

Dr .Karen Yeates and Mennonite Economic Development Associates (MEDA), Waterloo, ON

In 2012, there were an estimated 207 million cases of malaria worldwide. In Tanzania, the disease causes roughly 100,000 deaths each year, an overwhelming majority of them children under five. Pregnant women and young children are at highest risk by far. Since 2011, the Tanzania National Voucher Scheme (TNVS) has used mobile phone text messaging to provide pregnant women with an electronic voucher redeemable at participating retailers for long-lasting insecticidal bed nets, for a nominal fee (33 cents). The scheme has made a significant impact on malaria control in Tanzania but gaps remain – about 40% of women do not redeem the e-voucher, puzzling researchers: do they have enough nets in the home? Did they misplace their e-voucher? Could they not even afford the modest price? Do they understand the protection a net offers? Waterloo, Ontario-based Mennonite Economic Development Associates (MEDA), an international economic development organization that creates business solutions to poverty, is an implementing partner of the TNVS. With the help of a global health researcher at Queen’s University, the organization wants to increase the efficiency of the distribution system, focus it more intensively in areas of high malarial risk and examine how the remarkable text-based delivery system could be applied to additional health threats of growing importance, such as hypertension. MEDA and Dr. Karen Yeates of Queens University have designed a cluster randomized trial that will test the effectiveness of a text message (SMS) dialogue with the women who are issued an e-voucher, sending them reminders to redeem them for nets. The team will also collect data about usage and barriers, and investigate potential solutions. This will not only indicate if SMS is an effective method to ensure redemption but will also investigate  why some women do not redeem their net voucher. Involving the end user will ultimately lead to better management and improve the electronic delivery method, reducing the burden of malaria for women and children. “Africa’s health challenges, like malaria and hypertension, are challenges too big for a government or the private sector to solve alone,” notes Thom Dixon, Director Business of Health at MEDA. “With Grand Challenges Canada’s funding, the team can apply action-oriented market research skills that lead to more effective commercial bed-net delivery and promotion, so more households – particularly those with pregnant women and children – sleep safely under bed nets. Moreover, the funds will enable piloting of e-vouchers to fight hypertension, a growing threat in Africa.”

“The innovation lies in the fact that we are putting the people most at risk – pregnant women – in the driver’s seat, enabling them to help us create a better system, and to improve not only their lives but the lives of other people,” says Dr. Yeates. Grand Challenges Canada is awarding a $792,000 grant, supplementing funds secured by MEDA, generating a total investment of $1.5 million.

Video: http://bit.ly/1jTy7En, Pictures: http://bit.ly/1nx18q7.

$15 million to boost cancer trials collaboration

Published Fri May 30/14 3:00pm.
The NCIC Clinical Trials Group (CTG) at Queen’s University has been awarded $15 million in funding from the U.S. National Institutes of Health through the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI) to strengthen its work leading major cancer clinical trials in Canada. The funding allows the NCIC CTG to increase its collaborations with the U.S. NCI and its National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN).

This funding from the NCI will give Canadian cancer patients access to cutting-edge international clinical trials, potentially helping to prolong and improve the quality of life of those living with cancer. It also allows NCIC CTG to open its trials to the U.S. groups. Read more...

Malignant Extradural Spinal Cord Compression - A review of diagnosis and management

Published Thu May 29/14 3:45pm.
Presented by: Dr. Greg Patey

0800-0900
Friday May 23, 2014
36 Barrie Street

Flyer attached.
Presentation slides and References attached.

Notary Public Available

Published Thu May 22/14 10:00am.
Residents are reminded that a Notary Public is available in the PGME Office to assist with CPSO Independent License applications.  Please contact Nicholas Snider to make an appointment, or call the PGME Office at 613-533-2543.

World-renowned surgeon to receive honorary degree

Published Tue May 20/14 4:00pm.

Dr. Bernard Langer, a world-renowned surgeon, will receive an honorary degree at this year’s convocation ceremony for Queen’s MD program.

Dr. Langer became a fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada in 1961 and joined the staff of the Toronto General Hospital in 1963. He was chair of the Division of General Surgery, University of Toronto, from 1982 to 1989 and was the Colonel R.S. McLaughlin Professor and Chairman of the Department of Surgery from 1982 to 1992. His clinical and research interests have focused mainly on diseases of the liver, biliary tract and pancreas. He developed an internationally respected Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery Unit and Liver Transplantation Program at the University of Toronto, and has authored or co-authored 174 papers and 29 book chapters, been visiting professor at university centres around the world on 67 occasions and has been on the editorial boards of numerous scientific journals.

Dr. Langer will receive his honorary degree (D. Sc.) on Thursday, May 22 at 2:30 pm at Grant Hall.

Quality End-of-Life Care and Resources in Southeastern Ontario to Help Achieve It

Published Mon May 12/14 9:45am.
Presented by: Dr. Ray Viola

0800-0900
Friday May 16, 2014
36 Barrie Street

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
1. List factors that impact on perceived quality of care at the end-of-life
2. Access resources to assist in providing high quality end-of-life care

Flyer attached here.   
Sign-in sheet and Evaluation Form attached.
Presentation slides attached.

Quality End-of-Life Care and Resources in Southeastern Ontario to Help Achieve It

Published Mon May 12/14 9:00am.
Presented by: Dr. Ray Viola

0800-0900
Friday May 16, 2014
36 Barrie Street

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
1. List factors that impact on perceived quality of care at the end-of-life
2. Access resources to assist in providing high quality end-of-life care

Flyer attached here.
Presentation slides attached.

Before and Beyond CLOT: Venous thromboembolism in palliative care

Published Thu May 08/14 11:00am.
Presented by: Dr. Craig Goldie

0800-0900
Friday May 9, 2014
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:

1. Define the incidence and risks of venous thromboembolism in palliative care
2. Discuss the evidence for VTE prophylaxis in our patients
3. Discuss the evidence for VTE treatment past the 6 month CLOT trial window

Flyer attached here

Bridging the gap between ideas and action for global health

Published Wed Apr 30/14 11:00am.

Bridging the gap between ideas and action is the focus of the second annual Knowledge Translation for Global Health Summer Institute at Queen’s University. The conference offers upper-level students, graduate students, researchers and professionals an opportunity to learn about global health and social problems and how best to move evidence into action to improve or solve them.

“We cannot ignore the gap between knowledge and action,” says event co-chair Colleen Davison (Public Health Sciences). “Knowledge translation is important in many areas. We need to move apply knowledge towards improving health in vulnerable populations, food security and even service reconstruction in areas of conflict. This workshop will provide the tools for bridging the gap that so often exists between the knowledge of solutions and their implementation.”

Based on feedback following the inaugural conference, the organizers have developed a new two-day option this year that is designed to emphasize skill-building. Participants in the two-day workshop will build competences in such areas as deliberative dialogue, partnership building and message communication.

The original five-day workshop will involve a more comprehensive approach to building knowledge translation understanding through a small group, problem-based learning experience. In addition to attending the skills workshop, students in this option will have opportunities to apply their new skills to a current global health project with the help of an experienced mentor. One of the main goals of the event is to build a supportive community for knowledge translation and mentors who have experience in the field will be available for one-on-one support throughout the week.

As an opportunity for public participation, there is a free public roundtable discussion titled “Knowledge Translation in Context: Lessons from the Poorest Countries to the Richest.” Keynote speakers include Margaret Biggs, the Skelton-Clark Fellow in the School of Policy Studies and former president of the Canadian International Development Agency, and Ian Graham, former vice-president of Knowledge Translation at Canadian Institutes of Health Research and senior scientist at the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute. This event will take place on Tuesday, June 4 from 6:30- 8 pm at the New Medical Building .

The Global Health Summer Institute runs June 2-6 and early bird registration is now open.

Dean honoured by U.K. surgical society

Published Wed Apr 30/14 11:00am.
 


Richard Reznick, Dean, Faculty of Health Sciences, and a professor in the Department of Surgery, has been awarded an honourary fellowship of the Association of Surgeons of Great Britain and Ireland. Reserved for surgeons and other distinguished medical practitioners, it is the highest honour the association can confer. Dr. Reznick is only the second Canadian surgeon to receive the award.

“I have had a longstanding association with the society, including many excellent collaborations with surgeons from Great Britain and Ireland,” says Dr. Reznick. “It is an honour to be recognized as an honorary fellow.”

Upcoming Prizes and Awards

Published Tue Apr 29/14 4:00pm.
PSI Resident Research Prize and the CSCI Award for Excellence in Resident Research:
 
Each year the PSI (Physicians Services Incorporated) Foundation sponsors research awards to encourage scholarly inquiry in residency programs. Five $2000.00 awards are available at Queen's and all residents are encouraged to write and submit their research projects to the Postgraduate Medical Education office at 70 Barrie Street by  May 30, 2014 at 4:30pm. The project may be basic or clinical research.

Criteria for the award:
 
  1. Prizes will be awarded for excellence in papers written by residents (post-certification clinical fellows are not eligible) on clinically related subjects. Residents may be enrolled in either the College of Family Physicians of Canada or the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada postgraduate residency programs.
  2. The project should describe clinical research that has extended over more than one year and must represent work done by a trainee while at Queen's and not that of the supervising staff person.
  3. Papers will be judged on originality, quality of enquiry, methods used and presentation including illustrations and English language usage. Additional weight will be given if a paper has been submitted for publication or will be presented at a scientific meeting.
  4. A statement from the supervising faculty member outlining the Resident's role in the project must accompany the submission.
  5. Four copies of the typed, double-spaced paper must be received in the Postgraduate Medical Education office by May 30, 2014 at 4:30pm.
  6. Projects must have received approval from the University Research Ethics Board.
  7. Papers will be judged by a panel of Clinical Teachers at Queen's University. The panel reserves the right not to award all five prizes. There will be no allocation or reserve for individual disciplines.
All submissions for the PSI Award will automatically be considered for the CSCI Award.
 
CSCI Award Program for Excellence in Resident Research
 
The Canadian Society for Clinical Investigation (CSCI) and the Canadian Institute of Health Research (CIHR) jointly sponsor a research competition for the best resident research project.
 
The prize is $1,000 and submissions are due to the Postgraduate Medical Education office at 70 Barrie Street by 4:30pm on May 30, 2014.
 
Please do not hesitate to contact Barb Heffernan in the PGME Office with any questions.
 

DO THE RIGHT THING! But, what is right?

Published Tue Apr 29/14 10:00am.
Presented by: Dr. Ray Viola

0800-0900
Friday May 2, 2014
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:

1. Discuss the meaning of 'DNR' 
2. Debate ethical decision-making in clinical care

Note: At Palliative Care Round this week, we will discuss the attached 2 1/2 page article from the most recent CMAJ, describing two patient scenarios that raise questions pertinent to the end-of-life care we provide.  Please read the 2 scenarios (they are very brief) at least, and the rest of the short article, if you have time.  There will not be any PowerPoint or didactic component.  We will discuss and debate.  Thank you. (Article attached here)

Registration Reminder

Published Wed Apr 23/14 10:00am.
All residents who plan to continue in their residency programs in 2014-2015 are reminded that they must complete the online registration process.  You will need your Queen's NetID and Password in order to log into the secure online registration system. Once into the system, you will be guided through the requirements for Queen’s Postgraduate Medical Education registration and Kingston General Hospital contract renewal and reappointment. Please note that you can complete the KGH information at any time. You are encouraged to complete this as quickly as possible.   Complete information is available at http://meds.queensu.ca/education/postgraduate/registration/returning 

Travill Debate 2014

Published Thu Apr 17/14 1:00pm.
The Travill Debate 2014

New Division of Dermatology launched

Published Wed Apr 16/14 2:00pm.

The shortage of dermatologists in the local area is about to end. Today the Department of Medicine at Queen’s University is launching a new academic Division of Dermatology. The clinics will be based at Hotel Dieu Hospital and the Cancer Centre of Southeastern Ontario.

“Canadian Dermatology Workforce Survey documents indicate that the clinical needs of an area with the population of Southeastern Ontario should be served by approximately nine dermatologists,” says Stephen Archer, Head of the Department of Medicine at Queen’s. “Until now, however, we’ve had only one very busy private practice dermatologist.”

“Typically, patients have seen the existing dermatologist, been referred elsewhere or not seen at all.  Patients have been dramatically underserved here, and the recruitment of these two new dermatologists marks the beginning of the long journey to address those patient needs and to build an outstanding academic dermatology program at Queen’s.”

The Hotel Dieu clinics started up the week of March 31, when Yuka Asai began seeing patients.  Recruited from McGill University where she is completing a PhD, Asai brings clinical expertise in dermatology and research interests that include understanding the genetic basis of peanut allergy.  In August, the division will add a second specialist physician/PhD, Mark Kirchhof, to help meet the growing demand for dermatological services at a time when skin cancer rates alone are skyrocketing.

Still in its early days, the new Division will ramp up slowly, he says, which means patients eager for an appointment should not expect to be seen immediately. “We’re facing a decade of need that won’t be solved overnight.  We want to develop the program in a way that doesn’t swamp capacity,” Dr. Archer explains.

Patients will require a referral from their family physician to attend the clinic at Hotel Dieu, which is being equipped with therapeutic phototherapy technology used to treat various skin diseases and conditions such as psoriasis, eczema and skin lymphoma.  At present, the clinic is targeting adults only.

For more information visit the Hotel Dieu website.

2014 Simulation Olympics

Published Wed Apr 16/14 10:00am.


The 2014 competition will be held on April 30th, May 1st and 2nd (Wed/Thurs/Fri) at the Queen’s Clinical Simulation Centre. Faculty-supervised practice sessions will be announced at a later date.

All teams must have the following: 4 members total with a maximum of 2 senior residents, an RN and/or RT member, and a supervising faculty coach.  Faculty coaches are responsible for practice sessions and debriefing during the competition.  Teams without an RN or RT will not qualify to go beyond the preliminary round. 

Registration will be open until April 1st and will be capped at twenty teams.

This year’s competition schedule will include a preliminary rounds (minimum 2 scenarios per team), a semi-final round, and a final round (top 3 teams overall).  The top placing teams from the preliminary round will advance directly to the FINALS.  The SEMIFINAL round will be a single elimination format (2nd-5th place teams). 


PRELIMINARY ROUND
Wednesday, April 30th (AM & PM) & Thursday, May 1st (AM).                     
Thursday, May 1st (PM) for out-of-town teams only.

SEMI-FINAL ROUND
Friday, May 2nd (AM) for the 2nd-5th place teams overall.

FINAL ROUND
Friday, May 2nd (4-6pm) for the 1st place team overall (direct from PRELIMS) and the 2 SEMIFINAL winners.

As in previous years, there will be lots of expertise to share, prizes to win, colleagues to share stories with, and an awards ceremony reception following the finals.  Come out and enjoy the competition as a competitor, spectator, or senior administrator/educator.

TO REGISTER YOUR TEAM…

Contact Jessica Montagner (Dept EM) by phone 613-548-2368 or email montagnj@kgh.kari.net c/o 2014 Simulation Olympics competition. Please include your team name, team captain contact info (cell/pager/email), team members, faculty coach, and preferred preliminary competition day/time. 

Researcher finds gaps in care for high-risk cancer patients

Published Mon Apr 14/14 10:00am.
Christopher Booth (Queen’s Department of Oncology and Kingston General Hospital) has found that chemotherapy before or after surgery for high-risk bladder cancer is not commonly used in routine clinical practice despite the fact that it is shown to improve long-term survival by five per cent. He is now using those findings to better understand the barriers to using chemotherapy, with the goal of implementing a plan to improve treatment rates.
“Results from our study demonstrate that chemotherapy given after surgery improves patient survival—probably on the same order of magnitude as chemotherapy before surgery,” says Dr. Booth. “Patients having surgery for bladder cancer should have chemotherapy, either before or after surgery. Efforts are needed to improve uptake of this treatment, which appears to be vastly underutilized.”

To investigate, Dr. Booth, a member of the Cancer Research Institute at Queen’s University, examined treatment records of all 2,944 patients who had surgery for high-risk bladder cancer in Ontario between 1994 and 2008.

Use of chemotherapy before surgery remained stable (an average of four per cent of patients) over the study period despite international guidelines recommending its use.  Despite more limited evidence supporting its use, chemotherapy after surgery increased over time: 16 per cent of patients between 1994 and 1998, 18 per cent between 1999 and 2003, and 22 per cent between 2004 and 2008. Study results showed that use of chemotherapy after surgery improved long-term survival by five per cent.

“The reasons for underutilization of chemotherapy in high-risk bladder cancer are not well understood. This problem is not unique to Ontario and has been identified by researchers in the United States and Europe,” says Dr. Booth. “It likely relates to a complex interaction between physician knowledge, beliefs and attitudes and patient preferences.

“More work is needed to understand what is driving this gap in care so that interventions to improve treatment delivery may be implemented in Ontario and beyond.”

The findings are published online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society.

When Grief Gets Complicated

Published Thu Apr 10/14 9:00am.
Presented by: Jessica Bonney, MSW, RSW
Social worker, Psychosocial Oncology, CCSEO

0800-0900
Friday April 11, 2014
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. To define complicated grief and how it differs from uncomplicated grief
2. To review the predictors of complicated grief
3. To discuss implications for practice

Flyer attached here.
Presentation slides attached here.
The article that is the basis for the presentation: Predictors of complicated grief: A systematic review of empirical studies. E Lobb, L Janson, S. Aoun, L. Monterosso, G. Halkett, A. Davies. Death Studies, 34:673-698, 2010

Heart health: Is Aspirin helpful or harmful?

Published Wed Apr 09/14 1:30pm.

By Anne Craig, Communications Officer

Queen’s University and Kingston General Hospital researchers are part of a groundbreaking international study that has shown that starting – or continuing – to take Aspirin before non-cardiac surgery as a way to protect the heart after surgery is ineffective and, in some cases, harmful.

Because surgery puts patients at increased risk of heart attack, doctors often continue to administer low doses of Aspirin before and after non-cardiac procedures. But new data from the Peri-Operative Ischemic Evaluation Study (POISE-2), published last week in the New England Journal of Medicine, shows that administering Aspirin provided no benefit in reducing the risk of heart-related complications after surgery. continue reading ...

Queen's earns four new Canada Research Chairs

Published Wed Apr 02/14 2:00pm.

Four Queen’s University professors have been named new Canada Research Chairs and one professor’s current chair position is being renewed. The five chairs are Canadian leaders in their respective research fields.

Developed in 2000, each year the CRC program invests up to $265 million to attract and retain some of the world's most accomplished and promising minds. Queen’s will receive $200,000 per year over seven years for each Tier 1 Chair and $100,000 per year over five years for each Tier 2 Chair.

“By attracting the most skilled and promising researchers, the CRC program facilitates cutting-edge research and advances Canada as a world leader in discovery and innovation,” says Steven Liss, Vice-Principal (Research).  “Our success in garnering four new chairs and one renewal is demonstrative of  Queen’s leadership in research areas that address some of the most challenging and complex problems facing the world today – from human health and climate change to development of software intelligence.”

The university’s new chair appointments are Stephen Archer, Ahmed Hassan, Philip Jessop, Andy Take and Curtis Nickel has had his appointment renewed.

Stephen Archer (School of Medicine) has been named at Tier 1 Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Chair in Mitochondrial Dynamics and Translational Medicine. His research examines pulmonary arterial hypertension and cancer and is working towards devising new treatments. continue reading...

Sexual Health after Gynecologic Malignancy

Published Wed Mar 26/14 2:00pm.
Presented by: Dr. Hasan Khudairi
Palliative Medicine Fellow, Queen's University

0800-0900
Friday March 28, 2014
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. To recognize barriers to addressing sexual health
2. To be aware of treatment modalities for gynecologic cancers and their effects on sexual health
3. To use diagnostic and assessment tools for sexual health of women with gynecologic cancers
4. To manage sexual dysfunction
5. To recognize the need for good communication


Flyer attached.

Olympic champion raises funds for local mental health initatives

Published Mon Mar 24/14 10:00pm.
When six-time Olympic medalist Clara Hughes visits Kingston March 24, she will be raising funds and awareness of mental health issues. Money raised at the event is being donated to a mental health research project led by Queen’s professor Roumen Milev (Psychiatry).

Major depression affects close to two million Canadians annually and is the leading cause of lost time from work.CAN-BIND (Canadian Biomarker Integration Network for Depression) is a joint initiative between researchers at eight universities. The goal is to identify the biological signatures of currently uncharacterized subtypes of major depressive disorder to provide an accurate and rapid diagnosis that can help determine treatment selection.

“Clara’s Big Ride for Bell Let’s Talk is important for two reasons,” says Dr. Milev. “She is doing very important work de-stigmatizing mental health issues, and she is also raising imperative funding to support mental health research.”

Ms. Hughes will be speaking at the Ambassador Hotel and Conference Centre March 24 at 7 pm at the BREAK the stigma. JOIN the conversation event organized by the University Hospitals Kingston Foundation. Several Queen’s University researchers and students are speaking at the event, including:

Alex Martin, a third year psychology student. She is involved in the Jack Project and is the co-leader of Unleash the Noise Canada’s second annual student mental health summit.
Tom Edgerton,  a third year political studies student. He has been volunteering with the Jack Project for two years and has twice been the on-stage host of Unleash the Noise. This year he also worked alongside Ms. Martin as co-leader of the event.
Wendy Craig, a professor of psychology and one of Canada’s leading researchers in the field of mental health. Dr. Craig is the co-leader of the Promoting Relationships and Eliminating Violence Network (PREVNET), a knowledge mobilization network that focuses on reducing violence.
Saraosh Khalid-Khan, an associate professor of psychiatry and Director of the Mood and Anxiety Disorders Clinic in the Division of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry at Hotel Dieu Hospital.
Along with support from Clara’s Big Ride, CAN-BIND has received funding from the Ontario Brain Institute and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. Joining Queen’s in the five year research project are University of Toronto, McMaster University, University of Guelph, University of Ottawa, McGill University, University of Calgary and University of British Columbia.

Tickets are $12 for students and $20 for adults and available at the door.

Queen's Nursing showcasing state-of-the-art simulation equipment

Published Wed Mar 19/14 4:00pm.

Queen’s School of Nursing is organizing a conference in Toronto to showcase the new clinical simulation equipment that 13 Ontario nursing programs have purchased following a $5.8 million investment from the Ontario government’s Productivity and Innovation Fund (PIF).

“Blue Sky: Innovations in Patient Safety and Teaching and Learning” is running March 24 and 25 and will focus on enhancing registered nurse job readiness and patient safety outcomes thanks to the new funding.

“We want to produce job ready graduates,” says Jennifer Medves, director of Queen’s School of Nursing and Vice-Dean (Faculty of Health Sciences). “We can expose students to many new experiences, get them to critically think and utilize all of their nursing expertise, and to respond to unusual events with this new equipment. The simulation experience is an important part of their education.”

Queen’s School of Nursing faculty developed the clinical simulation education project in partnership with 12 other university schools of nursing, four colleges, and Ontario’s Simulation Network (SIM-one).  Several universities that received PIF funding will showcase their new clinical simulations at the conference. Queen’s participants will demonstrate new equipment designed to instruct students in ventilator support and respiratory distress. The equipment includes life-like mannequins for students to practice various techniques on.

This is the first time all 13 partner universities with four year degree programs are working together to develop unique education modules. These modules will be put into a large repository for use across the province.

For more information about the conference visit the website.

Assisted Death ---- Murder or End-of-Life Care? A Palliative Care Fellow's Journey Through the Literature

Published Tue Mar 18/14 11:30am.
Presented by: Dr. Kelly Parks
Palliative Medicine PGY3
Queen's University

0800-0900
Friday March 21, 2014
36 Barrie street

Objectives:
1. Define the terms involved in assisted-death
2. Outline the current state of assisted death around the world and in Canada
3. Review the evidence and issues around assisted death in context of the 
4. Four P's ... (Patients, Public, Physicians, Law/Policy makers)
5. Draw conclusions and open discussion

Flyer attached here.

Assisted Death ---- Murder or End-of-Life Care? A Palliative Care Fellow's Journey Through the Literature

Published Tue Mar 18/14 11:00am.
Presented by: Dr. Kelly Parks
Palliative Medicine PGY3
Queen's University

0800-0900
Friday March 21, 2014
36 Barrie street

Objectives:
1. Define the terms involved in assisted-death
2. Outline the current state of assisted death around the world and in Canada
3. Review the evidence and issues around assisted death in context of the 
4. Four P's ... (Patients, Public, Physicians, Law/Policy makers)
5. Draw conclusions and open discussion

Flyer attached here.
Sign-in sheet and Evaluation Form attached.

Call for Nominations

Published Mon Mar 10/14 3:00pm.
Nominations are now being accepted for the H. F. Pross Educational Technology Award and the Ron Wigle Mentorship Award.  Click on the links above for more information about these two awards and to access the nomination forms.

CaRMS Congratulations!

Published Fri Mar 07/14 9:00am.
Congratulations to all of the applicants who have just matched to Queen's.  We are looking forward to welcoming you to our programs in July, and orientation and registration information will be sent to you shortly.  If you have any questions in the meantime, please don't hestitate to contact the Postgraduate Medical Education Office.

Winter Newsletter

Published Tue Feb 25/14 2:00pm.
The PGME Winter Newsletter has now been distributed to all residents, clinical fellows, Program Directors, and Program Assistants.  Be sure to check your email for the newsletter and if you have not received it, please let us know by contacting the PGME Office.

Notary Public Available

Published Tue Feb 25/14 2:00pm.
Each year, residents and faculty members need the services of a Notary Public in order to complete a variety of documents.  Nicholas Snider is available daily in the Postgraduate Medical Education Office and can assit with documents such as:
  • CPSO Independent License applications
  • CPSO Restricted Registration applications
  • CPSO Corporation Renewals
  • USMLE applications
  • Out-of-province elective applications
Please contact Nicholas to make an appointment.

"Cold-hearted" protein protects saltwater fish from freezing

Published Thu Feb 20/14 9:00am.
A team of researchers at Queen’s University led by Peter Davies (Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences) has uncovered a unique protein in winter flounder called Maxi, which prevents the fish from freezing. This antifreeze protein is significantly larger than others they have studied from fish, insects, plants and microorganisms – hence the name.

Peter Davies and his team have discovered a new protein called Maxi.
Antifreeze proteins suppress the growth of harmful ice crystals in fish living in near-freezing seawater. The proteins bind to the surface of ice crystals to stop the ice from getting big enough to kill the fish. The ice-like waters in the interior of Maxi also help it bind to ice because they protrude through gaps in the protein chains and zip onto the ice, similar to what happens when you stick your tongue on a really cold Popsicle: your tongue will freeze to the ice.

“This could have implications in protein engineering for redesigning or selecting proteins to work at low temperatures,” says Dr. Davies. “A protein like Maxi could also be used to make salmon freeze-resistant for farming farther north in the Maritimes.”

A normal protein is made from a chain of amino acids that fold into a three-dimensional structure. During the folding process, water-fearing amino acids move into the middle of the protein and force the water out, while water-loving amino acids stay on the outside to help make the protein soluble. Maxi, on the other hand, uses ice-like waters on the inside of the protein to strengthen its structure.

The group’s research was funded by the Canadian Institutes for Health Research, and was published today in Science.
http://www.sciencemag.org/content/343/6172/795.abstract?sid=3e9ad5f2-d3a8-42a6-9a05-23427749e0b4

Canadian Forces at the School of Medicine

Published Wed Feb 19/14 2:00pm.
We are excited to welcome the Annual Health Services Med Tech Regional Workshop hosted by the Canadian Forces this Friday, February 21 at the New Medical Building.  

Medical students talk hot topics in health starting February 20

Published Wed Feb 19/14 1:00pm.
Over the next three months, the Queen’s School of Medicine will open its doors to the Queen’s and greater Kingston community for a series of discussions about contemporary health issues.

Queen’s Medicine Health Talks, recently founded by a group of first-year medical students, has planned three talks between now and April.

The first discussion, “Let’s Talk Heart Health,” takes place Feb. 20. It will focus on basic information about how to keep a healthy heart, and what could happen if you don’t. February is National Heart Health Month.

Queen’s Medicine Health Talks President Nothando Swan started initiative because she wanted to open up the School of Medicine Building to people at Queen’s outside of the medical school community, as well as the Kingston community.

“The idea behind these talks really stemmed from sitting in class and thinking about how amazing this facility is and how valuable it would be to have other people learning in the same space,” says Ms. Swan, Meds’17. “The School of Medicine has been great in allowing this idea to come to fruition and it demonstrates how supportive Queen’s is when it comes to ideas that students bring forward.”

Mental health will be discussed at the March 27 meeting. The topic for the April 17 discussion will be decided based on attendees’ feedback at previous talks. All of the talks will be held in the School Medicine Building, 15 Arch St., from 6 to 7 pm.

The organizers selected topics in consultation with healthcare professionals.  Medical students will prepare and lead the talks in close consultation with a physician who specializes in the topic. The physician will also attend the talk to answer any questions.

Tony Sanfilippo, a cardiologist and associate dean of undergraduate medicine in the School of Medicine, will participate in the first talk.

“This is a student-conceived, student-driven, student-delivered initiative intended to provide a useful service to our community in appreciation of the many contributions Kingstonians have made and continue to make to the education of our students,” says Dr. Sanfilippo. “It’s a marvelous expression of the personal qualities we hope our students will develop during their time with us, and reflects the mutually beneficial relationship that’s existed between the School of Medicine and Kingston community for over 150 years.”

To register for a health talk, send an email to qmht@qmed.ca and indicate which date(s) you’d like to attend.

Do Family Medicine Residents Feel Ready to Provide Palliative Care?

Published Fri Feb 14/14 2:00pm.
Presented by: Dr. Tony Soeyonggo

0800-0900
Friday February 21, 2014
Host Site: 36 Barrie Street

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
1) Identify the current state of palliative care curriculum received in medical school and residency for Queen's family medicine residents
2) Identify the residents' preferred learning formats and self-identified curricular topics to be considered for Queen's family medicine residency
3) Identify the barriers for Queen's family medicine residents to provide palliative care following graduation

Flyer is attached here.
Sign-in Sheet attached.
Evaluation Form attached.

Do Family Medicine Residents Feel Ready to Provide Palliative Care?

Published Fri Feb 14/14 2:00pm.
Presented by: Dr. Tony Soeyonggo

0800-0900
Friday February 21
36 Barrie Street

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
1) Identify the current state of palliative care curriculum received in medical school and residency for Queen's family medicine residents
2) Identify the residents' preferred learning formats and self-identified curricular topics to be considered for Queen's family medicine residency
3) Identify the barriers for Queen's family medicine residents to provide palliative care following graduation

Flyer is attached here.  

Blood transfusions in Palliative Care--the gift of life, the gift of love, or something else?

Published Thu Feb 13/14 2:00pm.
Presented by: Dr. Kelly Parks

0800-0900
Friday February 14, 2014
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. Outline the medical and ethical issues surrounding blood transfusions in the palliative care population
2. Review actual cases and the challenges inherent to the decision making process
3. Review the current literature and guidelines available regarding blood transfusions in Palliative Care
4. Open discussion and suggestions for future policy, research, guidelines, and direction

Flyer attached

2015-2016 Rotation Schedule Available

Published Thu Feb 06/14 9:00am.
Dates for the 2015-2016 Common Rotation Schedule are now available.  The schedule is developed jointly by Queen's University, McMaster University, Western University, and the University of Ottawa.  It can be found, along with rotation dates for 2013-2014 and 2014-2015, on the PGME website at:  http://meds.queensu.ca/education/postgraduate/rotation_schedules

Choosing Wisely 5 Years from Now

Published Mon Feb 03/14 3:00pm.
Presented by: Dr. Chris Frank

0800-0900
Friday January 31, 2014
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. be aware of the current Palliative Care lists from Choosing Wisely

2. consider gaps in PC knowledge and research
3. develop what the List might look like in 2019

Flyer attached here

Description and prediction of inpatient admissions and home care use following a terminal cancer diagnosis

Published Mon Feb 03/14 3:00pm.
Presented by: Alyson Mahar
PhD Candidate, Department of Public Health Sciences, Queen's University

0800-0900
Friday February 7, 2014
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:

1. Introduction to health services research at Queen’s University
2. Describe regional variations in health service use following a metastatic gastric cancer diagnosis in Ontario.
3. Identify predictors of two major cost drivers in the care of metastatic gastric cancer patients in Ontario.

Flyer attached here.

Blouin to receive national award from AFMC

Published Wed Jan 29/14 6:45pm.

Danielle Blouin (Emergency Medicine) has been announced as the 2014 recipient of The Award for Outstanding Contribution to Faculty Development in Canada from the Association of Faculties of Medicine Canada (AFMC). Dr. Blouin will receive the award at the 2014 Canadian Conference on Medical Education (Ottawa, Ontario), April 26 - 29.

“Dr. Blouin has significantly contributed to the quality of Canadian medical teaching, and this national recognition is well deserved,” says Richard Reznick, Dean, Faculty of Health Sciences. “At, Queen’s, through her leadership and dedication, she has helped to elevate our reputation for innovation in medical education and our reputation for teaching quality.”

Dr. Blouin is well recognized as an innovator and champion of Faculty Development in Canada. She has dedicated her career path as a clinician educator to advancing the skills of her fellow teachers and the quality of medical education. She has personally delivered about 100 faculty development workshops and sessions at every teaching site for Queen’s medical school, McMaster, McGill, University of Alberta, Harvard Macy Institute, numerous hospitals across Canada and the Royal College.

As Director, Faculty Development for Queen’s Health Sciences from 2006-13, Dr. Blouin substantially fortified the skills of medical teachers during a period of expansion, which led to the creation of multiple training sites in a disseminated approach to undergraduate and postgraduate education.

Dr. Blouin has also served on nearly 60 provincial, national, international committees related to the advancement and innovation of curriculum, training programs and models to improve the skills of medical educators. Most recently she was appointed Assistant Secretary to the Committee on Accreditation of Canadian Medical Schools (CACMS).

As a medical education innovator, she also nationally known as the person who developed the national practice examination for Emergency Residents. This has been widely recognized as a key component of emergency medicine’s assessment process for residents in Canada.

The Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada (AFMC) represents the country’s 17 faculties of medicine and is the national voice for academic medicine. The organization was founded in 1943 and functions to support individually and collectively Canada’s medical schools through promotion of medical education, research, and clinical care.

Susan Cole made an honorary professor at Jinan university

Published Fri Jan 24/14 9:00am.

Professor Susan Cole says she’s always been internationally inclined since her first school trip to Japan at age 15. She loves to travel, enjoys bringing foreign students and postdoctoral fellows into her cancer research lab, and is involved in a handful of research collaborations with universities and clinics around the world.

“The beauty of biomedical science is that it is international,” says Dr. Cole, who teaches in the departments of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, and Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, and is a Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Cancer Biology and Bracken Chair in Genetics & Molecular Medicine. “Over the years, it’s been wonderful to have many different countries represented in the lab and see the connections and collaborations that emerge from the relationships.”

On top of working on projects with researchers in Australia, Korea, France and the U.S., Dr. Cole has recently been making more connections with scholars in China, and in the fall, she was appointed an honorary professor at Jinan University in Guangzhou, China’s third-largest city. China is working hard to expand its reach in the fields of biomedical and clinical sciences and Dr. Cole’s appointment is part of a push to draw more foreign-trained scientists to China to help further its research in these fields.

“I’m really honoured by the appointment,” says Dr. Cole, who was deputy provost at Queen’s between 2010 and 2012. “I feel a commitment to help in some way, as I believe what the Chinese government and its universities and hospitals are doing – investing in research on a large scale – is really good for the future of science. Their labs are top of the line, and it’s inspiring to see how fast they are working.”

Dr. Cole’s primary research focuses on drug sensitivity and why certain tumour cells are resistant to drugs. Her team discovered a new protein – MRP1 – that essentially acts as a drug pump, pumping drugs out of cells so they don’t die. The protein is relevant to certain cancers, particularly a common childhood cancer, neuroblastoma, which develops in the adrenal glands.

The research has helped her form numerous partnerships internationally, including a 20-year relationship with the Children’s Cancer Institute in Sydney, Australia. Dr. Cole works on the basic biology, while the institute’s scientists perform the translational and clinical work. The relationship is beneficial to both sides, as Dr. Cole gains access to more graduate students and funding, something she hopes will also increase with her work in China.

Course Registrations

Published Fri Jan 24/14 8:00am.
Course registration for PALS Provider and TNCC are now available. Please visit our "Courses Offered" page for more information. 

Queen’s Family Health Team receives two provincial awards

Published Thu Jan 23/14 3:00pm.

Queen’s Family Health Team (QFHT) is a leader in new models of health care. Led by Dr. Glenn Brown, Head, Department of Family Medicine, Queen's University, the team includes physicians, residents, nurse practitioners, nurses, social workers, a pharmacist, a dietitian and a foot care nurse, all focused on improving health care for their patients.

A tangible result of the team’s success is two recent awards the QFHT earned from the Association of Family Health Teams of Ontario (AFHTO) Bright Light Awards program. The Queen’s team won for Meaningful Use of Electronic Medical Records and Innovation in Interprofessional Collaborative Team Implementation at the AFHTO awards ceremony in October 2013. Out of 210 family health teams across Ontario, the QFHT won two of 12 awards presented.  In 2012, the year the Bright Light Awards program was launched, the QFHT won the award for “Getting Data and Using it to Improve Care” and earned one of four awards for “Best Practices in Health Promotion and Chronic Care.”

The Queen's Family Health Team celebrates its 2013 provincial awards during a holiday season workshop.

Family physicians were formerly trained to be autonomous professionals, working in a private office with only a receptionist and a nurse to help with the work. But this model of care became unsustainable and was limited in its ability to meet the primary care needs of patients. As people age they have more health issues, and addressing these issues is much easier in a team environment in which team members can work together to provide care more efficiently.

Last year, more than 55,000 patient visits occurred at the QFHT’s two Kingston clinic sites located at 220 Bagot Street and 115 Clarence Street. The Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care recently approved the addition of QFHT allied health staff at the Department’s academic site in Belleville. Dr. Karen Hall Barber, QFHT Physician Lead, and Diane Cross, Clinic Manager, in collaboration with their team, have developed and manage a number of patient programs focused on health promotion and disease prevention. Patient programs include diabetes care, chronic pain self-management, lactation support for new mothers, anti-coagulation management, social work counselling and a smoking cessation program.

“Team work and collaboration are essential elements in improving patient care,” says Ms. Cross. “It’s important for the team to contribute in the development and implementation of new ideas and programs and to share in the success equally.”

 “We use our electronic medical record program, ‘OSCAR,’ to document our patients’ medical history, and to track certain indicators of good health,” says Dr. Brown. “Patients’ results, such as blood sugar levels for diabetics or blood pressure levels, can be monitored and graphed to show changes over time. This helps to include the patients in monitoring and taking responsibility for their own health.”

Despite the successes, Dr. Brown says the team is still scratching the surface in terms of what is possible. “Our patients are benefitting from the leadership of this team, but this is a journey and it’s not over yet. There is still work to be done.”

What happens at home stays at home - Facilitating Expected Home Deaths in Southeastern Ontario

Published Thu Jan 23/14 9:00am.
Presented by: Dr. Ray Viola

0800-0900
Friday January 24, 2014
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:

1. List challenges facing end-of-life care in the community
2. Describe two initiatives to facilitate end-of-life care in the home in southeastern Ontario
3. Become aware of plans to evaluate the two initiatives

Flyer attached here

Margaret Angus Research Fellowship 2014

Published Tue Jan 21/14 9:00am.

The Museum of Health Care will accept proposals for a resident 16-week summer research fellowship (May-September), which will investigate a topic relevant to the history of health and health care (any discipline) utilizing the Museum's collections, reference materials, exhibits, and/or educational programs.

The Fellow will work on-site to produce a manuscript that will become part of the Museum’s collection and will deliver a public presentation of his or her findings, usually in the fall.
Senior undergraduate students and recent graduates of Honours Bachelor, Master's or PhD programs preferred.

To view a list of research topics of current interest to the Museum, visit http://museumofhealthcare.ca/research-and-collections/topicsofinterest.html. To view a list of topics previously covered, visit http://museumofhealthcare.ca/explore/research-and-collections/research-fellowship.html.

The goals of the fellowship are:

  • to develop an appreciation of the value of the history of health care
  • to become familiar with research methodology in the history of health care
  • to gain experience in historical research in the history of health care
  • to make a contribution towards understanding the artefacts in the Museum's collection and its reference materials
  • to understand the role of health care museums in the history of health care

Fellowship Criteria

  • The topic should clearly relate to the history and science of health and health care. See the Museum website for a list of suggested subjects.
  • The manuscript should include information from primary sources, such as archival papers and artefacts from the Museum collection, as well as photographs, illustrations, and other visuals.
  • The expectation at the end of the Fellowship is a manuscript and a public presentation.
  • One of the goals of the Fellowship is to provide experience for new scholars. As such, senior undergraduate and graduate students will be given preference.
  • Candidates should be prepared to complete their research within the time allotted for the Fellowship.

Value: $4600.00
Application Deadline: 3 February 2014 at 4:00 p.m.

Ann Baillie Building National Historic Site
32 George St., Kingston, Ontario, K7L 2V7 ● 613-548-2419 ● museum@kgh.kari.net ● www.museumofhealthcare.ca ● Charitable Registration #: 87790 3989 RR0001

The Fellow is expected to reside in the Kingston area for the duration of the Fellowship.
*Candidates considering applying for the

New workplace mental health program certified by the Faculty of Health Sciences to be delivered at Bell Canada

Published Fri Jan 17/14 11:00am.

Workplace mental health received a boost today with the announcement of a progressive new training program designed to support employees. Developed by Queen’s Faculty of Health Sciences and Morneau Shepell, Canada’s largest human resources consulting firm, the program enables learners to acquire additional skills, strategies and resources to address mental health issues in their working teams. Upon completion, program participants will receive a certificate from Queen’s. It will first be delivered to nearly 5,000 front-line managers at Bell Canada.

“Our education and research activity ultimately succeeds when it benefits Canadians beyond the walls of the academy,” says Richard Reznick, Dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences. “The new Morneau Shepell training program is a great example of this, and we are pleased to see it carry the Queen’s name. Together with the Department of Psychiatry, we have worked very hard to ensure this program meets our university’s high academic standards.”

The program, which is aligned with the National Standard of Canada for Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace introduced last January, was developed with input from Dr. Heather Stuart, the Bell Canada Chair in Mental Health and Anti-Stigma Research. Grounded in adult learning principles, the three-phased training program takes a blended approach that consists of both in-class and online learning, as well as an assessment process that includes final examinations.

Program material will include developing empathetic coaching skills, effective management practices focused on early intervention, recovery and return to work, and identifying the leaders’ scope of influence in promoting a mentally healthy workplace. The Faculty of Health Sciences has committed to formal annual review process in order to sustain and improve the quality of the program

“We know that as many as one in five adult Canadians experience some form of mental illness, but it’s the stigma attached to it that keeps two-thirds of them from seeking help for it,” says Dr. Stuart. “It’s wonderful to see Bell bringing this issue to the forefront in their workplace. Their investment in creating awareness and building skills through comprehensive research-based training is making significant inroads in improving mental health in the workplace and removing stigma, something that those with mental illness often describe as being worse than the illness itself.”

“By adopting this training program, certified by one of Canada’s leading universities, Bell Canada has taken the next step in reinforcing its position as a clear leader in mental health in Canada,” says Alan Torrie, President and Chief Executive Officer of Morneau Shepell. “The efforts to manage mental health in the workplace have now taken a huge leap forward.”

According to the Mental Health Commission of Canada, mental health issues have a powerful and expanding impact in the workplace, costing the economy an estimated $50 billion annually. Mental health challenges and illnesses are the number one cause of disability in Canada, and the MHCC estimates that between 10 and 25 per cent of mental disability costs directly incurred by many employers could be avoided by implementing psychologically healthy and safe workplace strategies.

 

Pruritis in Palliative Care

Published Tue Jan 14/14 9:00am.
Presented by: Dr. Craig Goldie

0800-0900
Friday January 17, 2014
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:

1. Understand the burden of pruritis in palliative care
2. Learn about the presumed mechanism of pruritis
3. Explore some evidence-informed treatment options

Flyer attached here.

Pruritis in Palliative Care

Published Tue Jan 14/14 9:00am.
Presented by: Dr. Craig Goldie

0800-0900
Friday January 17, 2014
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:

1. Understand the burden of pruritis in palliative care
2. Learn about the presumed mechanism of pruritis
3. Explore some evidence-informed treatment options

Flyer attached here.
Sign-in Sheet attached.
Evaluation form attached.
Presentation slides attached

Jeopardy! winner shares his experiences

Published Thu Jan 09/14 6:00am.

For Matthew Church, writing his respirology exam was more nerve wracking than his three appearances on the hit game show Jeopardy!.

 Image courtesy of Jeopardy Productions, Inc.Mr. Church, a second year student in the Queen’s School of Medicine, competed three times on Jeopardy!, which was filmed back in October in California. Mr. Church had to keep the outcome of his competition a secret until the episodes aired on December 16th, 17th and 18th.

His first night victory saw Mr. Church so far in the lead that he had $24,000 before the final jeopardy even started. He then proceeded to win the episode with his answer “What is Laos?”

What was the application process like?

“It wasn’t something that I had ever tried before. When I started at Queen’s some of my classmates mentioned that they had taken the online quiz, so in January 2013 I tried it. The quiz was open to everyone in North America and around 250 or 300 thousand people signed up to take it when there was only enough space for 400 contestants. In June I was invited to audition in person on-camera in Toronto. Fairly soon after that I got a call back for another interview and by August I was given one month’s notice to get to Los Angeles for filming.”

How did it feel to get selected?

“Getting selected was the biggest thrill. Appearing on the show was a dream come true as I’ve been watching Jeopardy! since I before I could answer most of the questions. I think that for anyone who enjoys trivia, Jeopardy! is the pinnacle of trivia competitions.”

How did your friends and family react to your wins?

“When I shot the episode back in the beginning of October I knew that it was going to air on December 16th which was the day of my two final exams. The timing couldn’t have been better as that episode was the one where I had my most dominating performance on Jeopardy!. Around fifty of my classmates came out to the Grad Club to watch, and I was able to make it back to Prince George in time to watch the second episode with my family. It wasn’t that difficult to keep it a secret because I knew that it would be more exciting if I didn’t say anything. There was a lot of excitement but nobody seemed very surprised, I had a lot of people say ‘If someone was going to do it then it would be you.’”

How did you prepare for the show?

“I had some of my classmates quiz me on a bunch of things and I made sure I brushed up on topics that I knew I was weak at, like U.S. presidents. You don’t know the categories beforehand, though, so it’s really impossible to be totally prepared.”

Were you nervous? How did you combat those nerves?

“I was extremely nervous. Jeopardy! has their stage crew come by and wipe the sweat off your forehead and I had to wipe the sweat off my thumbs so I could actually click the buzzer. After the first episode I felt that I had accomplished everything I ever dreamed of. On nights two and three I had more trouble with the buzzer, but I’m amazed I looked so confident during two very close games!”

What was the best part of the experience?

“It was great to watch the show with so many classmates and friends. It’s so touching to have people cheering you on and when I got back to Prince George that was just magnified even more, it felt like the whole city was behind me. It felt great to be able to share a really positive and exciting story with so many people.”

In total, Mr. Church won $31,000. He says he will be putting some of it towards his tuition fees, as well as having already made donations to Wikipedia and the Prince George Public Library.

“I’d like to take a trip this summer and give my brain a chance to recharge,” says Mr. Church. “I’m thinking of Laos.”

 Image courtesy of Jeopardy Productions, Inc.

Dementia Is Not a Cure for Pain

Published Wed Jan 08/14 9:00am.
Presented by: Kathy Baker  & Trish Macpherson

0800-0900
Friday January 10, 2014
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1.Participants will recognize the complexity of managing pain in those with dementia
2.To identify the manifestations of pain in those with dementia
3. Increased awareness of the tools to assess pain in dementia

Flyer attached here.

New Queen's research may lead to healthier pregnancies

Published Wed Jan 08/14 6:00am.
New research out of Queen’s University has shown that anti-inflammatory drugs could be beneficial in the treatment of abnormal maternal inflammation during pregnancy, a condition that can cause serious diseases like pre-eclampsia and can lead to small babies.

Professor Charles Graham (Biomedical and Molecular Sciences) worked on the project along with lead author Tiziana Cotechini (PhD student, Biomedical and Molecular Sciences) and co-authors Maria Komisarenko, Arissa Sperou, Shannyn Macdonald-Goodfellow and Michael A. Adams. Read Full Article →

Matthew Church (Meds’16) wins again on Jeopardy!

Published Wed Dec 18/13 2:00pm.

Matthew Church with Jeopardy host Alex Trebek
Matthew Church with Jeopardy host Alex Trebek!

Matthew Church, Meds’16 is now a two-time Jeopardy champion.

After an online quiz and an in-person interview Matthew Church, a second year medical student at Queen’s, was selected from 250,000 people to compete on Jeopardy! 

Nearly a year after he applied, he won $24,000 on the show that aired on Monday December 16, and won again on the Tuesday episode the following night with $5,000.

Hailing from Prince George, British Columbia, Mr. Church travelled to California for the taping of the episode in October and then watched the episode with 50 of his classmates from Queen’s before traveling home.

“It’s a thrill of a lifetime,” said Mr. Church in an interview with Globalnews.ca. “I never thought I would get on the real show.”

Mr. Church was so far ahead of his other contestants that he managed to win the Final Jeopardy round on Monday night without betting any money.

In the same interview Mr. Church said he would use his prize money to help pay off his student loans and perhaps make a donation to Wikipedia.

Keep following Jeopardy! this week to see Mr. Church defend his title. 

Queen's Nursing leading $5.8 million province-wide initiative

Published Fri Dec 13/13 11:00am.

A School of Nursing-led partnership to substantially advance nursing education has received a $5.8 million grant from the Government of Ontario’s Productivity and Innovation Fund. Thirteen of Ontario’s university nursing programs, in collaboration with four colleges will collaborate on redesigning upper year clinical courses and develop new clinical simulations.

Jennifer Medves, Vice-Dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences and the Director of the School of Nursing, says these new simulations will prepare nurses to provide high quality, safe care in situations they do not frequently encounter in their education.

“The simulations will focus on complex scenarios not often encountered during nursing education because of the infrequency of some of the events. A number of them will address the specific needs of vulnerable populations, such as children, the elderly and aboriginal peoples,” says Dr. Medves. “This enhanced experiential learning will better prepare registered nurses and lead to better safety outcomes for patients.”

The nursing initiative was one of three Queen’s-led projects to receive a total of $6.8 million in funding – one to reduce the costs of administrative information systems and the third to support blended and active learning at Queen’s.

“The Productivity and Innovation Fund provides a valuable opportunity for Queen’s to make strategic investments that enhance our students’ learning experience and improve the productivity of our operations,” says Daniel Woolf, Principal and Vice-Chancellor. “In particular, a Queen’s-led partnership will enhance nursing educational programs through new clinical simulations, ultimately resulting in better outcomes for patients and families.”

The Productivity and Innovation Fund is a one-time, $45-million initiative of the Government of Ontario to support innovation and enhance the learning experience at Ontario’s universities and colleges. In addition to the three Queen’s-led projects, the university is a partner in 10 others that received support through the fund.

New scientific director focuses on improvement in health care for seniors

Published Thu Dec 12/13 4:00pm.

With a growing population of elderly people in Canada, advances in medical care and technology are critical for the care of the seriously ill, frail elderly. John Muscedere (School of Medicine) is the new scientific director of TVN (Technology Evaluation in the Elderly Network), whose mission is to fill unmet research needs for that segment of the population.

The four identified TVN strategic priorities include: matching care to values, which includes developing an ethical framework for the care of the frail elderly; empowering, engaging and supporting patients and their families and caregivers; improving clinical outcomes; and improving care across the continuum.

“There is not a lot of research in this area of medicine,” says Dr. Muscedere, an associate professor in the Queen’s Department of Medicine and an intensive care physician at Kingston General Hospital. “TVN is something unique to Canada; it’s an organization focused on improving care, improving care outcomes and also supporting families and caregivers through supporting evidence-based practice. ”

Created July 1, 2012 TVN is a not-for-profit research network funded by the Government of Canada’s Networks of Centres of Excellence program. The goal of TVN is to position Canada as a global leader in providing the highest quality of care for its aging population. To achieve that goal, TVN supports research that will influence policy and practice and also fill knowledge gaps. The Network is also working to build national and international strategic partnerships.

“Daren Heyland had a vision and that led to our funding,” says Dr. Muscedere. “I want to continue what he started and in five, ten, 15 years I want to see concrete improvements in care for the frail elderly. I want to commission new knowledge and then implement that knowledge. We currently fund 100 researchers and that will continue to grow.”

Funded research projects include a national comparison of end-of-life care in Canada, an international study into how clinicians discontinue breathing machines, equity in access to critical care, and examining the optimal circumstances for starting dialysis in older patients.

“The frail elderly are a population with many medical issues so that’s where the need is,” says Dr. Muscedere. “Researchers have been working in this area in isolation for years. TVN is an organization that can bring together all of these groups in a coordinated effort to improve care of the frail elderly.”

For more information on TVN visit the website.

Important Postgraduate Awards Information

Published Wed Dec 11/13 2:00pm.
There are a number of awards and bursaries with upcoming deadlines.  Please see the attached flyer or refer to the PGME Awards website for further information.

From a sore back to death by Bowel Perforation...an unusual case of lung cance

Published Tue Dec 10/13 11:00am.
Presented by: Dr. Kelly Parks

0800-0900
Friday December 13, 2013
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:

1. To outline the case
2. To provide an overview of current literature around bowel perforation in lung cancer
3. To discuss possible pathophysiology and confounders
4. To discuss lessons learned

Flyer attached here

Archer's mitochondrial research offers new targets to fight serious diseases

Published Thu Dec 05/13 12:00pm.

Department of Medicine Chair, Stephen Archer’s research has revealed that in serious human diseases (such as pulmonary hypertension, lung cancer, cardiac arrest and neurologic disease) the cell’s power source, known as mitochondria, displays an abnormal structure.

Dr. Archer discussed his findings in a recent New England Journal of Medicine article, Mitochondrial Dynamics — Mitochondrial Fission and Fusion in Human Diseases.

“This explosion in the understanding of the once secret lives of mitochondria will almost certainly advance our understanding of an important mechanism for cell death and cell growth,” says Dr. Archer. “This basic understanding offers new molecular targets for therapies of neurologic diseases, cancer and pulmonary hypertension.”

Five original research papers from Dr. Archer’s lab and other labs around the world have discovered the molecular basis for these structural changes in mitochondria. This new field of study is called mitochondrial dynamics and it reveals how abnormalities in the life cycle of mitochondria (including the ways mitochondria divide (fission), join together (fusion) and are eliminated) result in disease causing changes in cell growth and survival.

This rapidly evolving discipline has already identified several new targets for therapy for diseases ranging from Parkinsonism and pulmonary hypertension to cardiac arrest.

In the NEJM article, Dr. Archer advocates for research into new drugs that target fission and fusion.  He is also working on new ways to image the bacteria-sized mitochondria, such as new “super resolution” light microscopes, which will allow researchers to see the organelles better and thereby better understand their function.

Exploring New Frontiers: Palliative Care in Rheumatic Diseases

Published Wed Dec 04/13 10:00am.
Presented by: Dr. Mino Mitri

0800-0900
Friday December 6, 2013
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1 - Gaining an understanding of the specific rheumatic diseases that would be considered for palliative care
2 - Recognizing the time of onset for palliative care in rheumatic diseases
3 - Discussing the gaps in literature on the management of these diseases in palliative care

Flyer attached here.

Death by Doctor or Helping People Live Well Until They Die

Published Thu Nov 28/13 12:00pm.
Presented by: Dr. Deborah Dudgeon

0800-0900
Friday November 29, 2013
36 Barrie Street

Goals/Objectives:
1. Review current state re: PAS/Euthanasia in Canada
2. Brief review of state in Belgium & Oregon
3. Focused discussion on what palliative care offers

Attendees are strongly encouraged to review coverage on this topic: http://news.nationalpost.com/tag/death-by-doctor/

Flyer attached here.

CaRMS Leadership Award

Published Wed Nov 27/13 9:00am.
Residents are invited to apply for the Sandra Banner Student Award for Leadership.  This award, accompanied by funding of up to $5,000, is given annually to undergraduate or postgraduate medical trainees who have demonstrated interest in/aptitude for leadership. Eligible learners must be enrolled full-time in a Canadian medical education program, and must reside in Canada.  The award application documents are also available for downloading from the CaRMS website. CaRMS’ Awards Committee will begin reviewing applications in January 2014, and the award winner will be announced at the CaRMS Forum in April 2014.  If you have any questions please contact awardscommittee@carms.ca.

Paul Belliveau deemed top Canadian undergraduate surgical educator

Published Mon Nov 25/13 1:30pm.

Paul Belliveau (Department of Surgery) has received The John Provan Outstanding Canadian Surgical Educator Award from the Canadian Undergraduate Surgical Education Committee (CUSEC). The award is one of the most prestigious national awards of its kind, and is given bi-annually to honour exceptional contributions to undergraduate surgical education in Canada.

“I am overjoyed,. But at the same time humbled by the fact that many other deserving candidates did not get it”, says Dr. Belliveau. “It is an inspiration to continue to strive for excellence in our Undergraduate Education Competencies program.”

Widely known for his deep commitment to his patients and to Queen’s medical students, Dr. Belliveau, has served for many years as a member of the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee. As a long-standing Course Director in year two of medical school, he began the implementation of small group learning as a teaching/learning method. He has also served as a Course Director in Clerkship, as well as a frequent and well-regarded teacher of surgery. He has served as Chair, Undergraduate Surgical Education Committee, a member of the Undergraduate Admissions Committee, and founding member of the Undergraduate Evaluation and Assessment Committee.

Dr. Belliveau received his award at the 14th Bi-Annual CUSEC Symposium. Dr. Brian Taylor, Chair of Nominations Committee, commented, “Suffice it to say that Dr. Paul Belliveau has been a tremendous surgical ambassador in carrying out Dr. Provan's legacy and message of not only supporting and mentoring your clerks and final year students, but also in taking the surgical message directly to the first and second year students.”

“This is a very prestigious national honour and we are thrilled that Paul Belliveau’s outstanding contributions to surgical education have been recognized,” says Richard Reznick, Dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences. “The efforts of innovative educators like Dr. Belliveau are a big reason why a seat in Queen’s M.D program is the most sought-after in Canada.”

Palliative Care in Saudi Arabia

Published Thu Nov 21/13 9:00am.
Presented by: Dr. Hasan Khudairi

0800-0900
Friday November 22, 2013
36 Barrie Street

During this session we will review:
1. Saudi Arabia in brief
2. Health system in Saudi Arabia
3. History of palliative care in Saudi Arabia
4. Palliative care in Saudi Arabia currently
5. Problems facing palliative care in Saudi Arabia

Flyer attached here

Leslie Flynn appointed Vice-Dean Education, Faculty of Health Sciences

Published Mon Nov 18/13 3:00pm.

Alan Harrison, Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic), is pleased to announce that Leslie Flynn has been appointed as the inaugural Vice-Dean Education for the Faculty of Health Sciences at Queen’s University for an initial term from November 1, 2013 to June 30, 2018.  Dr. Flynn had been the Interim Vice-Dean Education for the Faculty since August 2012.

Following the receipt of Bachelor and Master’s degrees in music from Queen’s University and the University of Toronto respectively, Dr. Flynn completed her undergraduate medical training at Queen’s., She subsequently pursued residency training in family medicine and psychiatry at Queen’s receiving certification from both the College of Family Physicians of Canada and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC). Dr. Flynn joined our Faculty as an Assistant Professor in the Departments of Psychiatry and Family Medicine in 1995. She was promoted to the rank of Associate Professor in 2008.

Regarded as an expert in clinical psychiatry, Dr. Flynn has served as the Director of the Psychotherapy Program in the Department of Psychiatry and, in 2010, she was appointed as the Department’s Deputy Chair, Academic.

Dr. Flynn is an educational scholar in the areas of competency-based medical education, interprofessional care and education, physician health and well-being, and the enhancement of the scholarship of teaching and learning. Her academic leadership roles have included Director of the Psychiatry Postgraduate Program, Assistant Dean and Associate Dean for Postgraduate Medical Education and Acting Director of the Office of Health Sciences Education. She has also served on many provincial, national and international educational/professional committees. As a Clinician Educator with the RCPSC, she serves in both national and international educational settings.  She also led the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care and Ontario Medical Association Physician Human Resources Working Group. Widely recognized for her administrative and managerial skills, Dr. Flynn’s teaching contributions have been recognized with numerous teaching awards.

Dr. Flynn has undertaken significant executive-level training in healthcare education at the Harvard Macy Institute (Harvard Medical School), the University of Toronto and Queen’s School of Business. She is currently a candidate for a Masters of Education from Queen's University

TNCC course

Published Wed Nov 13/13 10:00am.
We are excited to host our first TNCC course on December 4&5. Please visit 'Courses offered' for more details. Registration deadline is Monday November 18, 2013 (noon)

CTN Postdoctoral Fellowship Awards Program

Published Mon Nov 11/13 10:00am.
The CIHR Canadian HIV Trials Network (CTN) has just announced details for the 2014-2015 competition for the CTN Postdoctoral Fellowship Awards Program.  Download the flyer for further information.

Research studies the performance of blood thinners in the elderly

Published Fri Nov 08/13 4:00pm.

The line between effective and harmful is a thin one when it comes to the choice of blood thinners in seniors, says new research by Yan Xu, a third year undergraduate medical student at Queen’s, Dr. Ana Johnson, a professor in the Department of Public Health Sciences, and Dr. Chris Simpson, Head of the Division of Cardiology in the Department of Medicine.

In Canada, novel oral anticoagulants, also known as new blood thinners, entered the market in 2010 and are recommended as the first line therapy for stroke prevention in patients with a heart rhythm condition known as atrial fibrillation.

For the authors, Mr. Xu, Dr. Simpson, Dr. Johnson, Dr. Anne Holbrook and Dr. Dar Dowlatshahi, the age of those using these drugs is of particular interest because with increasing age comes an increased risk of bleeding.

“Blood thinners are associated with more hospitalizations due to drug reactions in seniors than any other medication class in Canada, one of the reasons being the window between when the drug is therapeutic and when it becomes harmful,” says Mr. Xu.

In their study published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal Open, the researchers found that new medications were most heavily used in patients over the age of 85, in whom the evidence of benefit and harm compared to warfarin, an older agent used for the same purpose, is limited.

After learning which age groups are being most commonly prescribed the drugs, the next step of the study will involve chart review of bleeding cases caused by these agents at four hospitals in Kingston, Ottawa and Hamilton.

 

Chris Simpson is Head of the Division of Cardiology in the School of Medicine.

 

Ana Johson is a professor in the Department of Public Health Sciences

Determining the resources that are used to reverse the bleeding in these patients and their outcomes are crucial to the investigators’ goal of generating and disseminating the best evidence for blood thinner treatment.

“It is crucial to understand the resource utilization and outcomes of patients in a real world setting,” says Mr. Xu. “It’s quite a unique collaboration that we have here.

The study was noted in the New England Journal of Medicine’s Journal Watch, a website developed by the prestigious journal to impart information to clinicians worldwide.

The study is available by open access through the publisher's website.

Diagnosis and Management of Cancer-Related Neuropathic Pain

Published Fri Nov 08/13 10:00am.
Presented by: Dr. Ray Viola

0800-0900
Friday November 15, 2013
36 Barrie Street

During this session, we will review:
1. causes and pathophysiology of cancer-related neuropathic pain
2. prevalence of neuropathic pain in cancer patients with pain
3. approach to diagnosing neuropathic pain
4. pharmacologic management of neuropathic pain

Click here for presentation slides
Flyer attached here
Sign-in Sheet attached here
Evaluation form attached here

Diagnosis and Management of Cancer-Related Neuropathic Pain

Published Fri Nov 08/13 10:00am.
Presented by: Dr. Ray Viola

0800-0900
Friday November 15, 2013
36 Barrie Street

During this session, we will review:
1. causes and pathophysiology of cancer-related neuropathic pain
2. prevalence of neuropathic pain in cancer patients with pain
3. approach to diagnosing neuropathic pain
4. pharmacologic management of neuropathic pain

Click here for presentation slides
Flyer attached here
Sign-in Sheet attached here
Evaluation form attached here     

Queen's mental health experts lead national study

Published Thu Nov 07/13 2:00pm.

By Anne Craig, Communications Officer

Queen’s University mental health experts Heather Stuart (Centre for Health Services and Policy Research and Public Health Sciences) Shu-Ping Chen (Public Health Sciences) and Terry Krupa (School of Rehabilitation Therapy) have received $1.7 million from Movember Canada for their latest project, The Caring Campus: An Intervention Project. The multi-institutional project focuses on substance abuse, reducing the stigma associated with substance misuse and creating a more caring campus. continue reading...

Award Deadlines

Published Thu Nov 07/13 9:00am.
Each year, the Postgraduate Medical Education Office encourages residents to submit applications for a variety of awards, bursaries, and fellowships.  There are two fellowships with upcoming application deadlines:  The Henry Albert Beatty Fellowship and the Cecil Reid Patience Fellowship.  These are both one year salary awards for residents applying to the Clinician Investigator Program (CIP) in order to obtain a graduate degree while enrolled in a residency training program at Queen’s.  Application for the Fellowships is a two-stage process.  First, a letter to the Director of the CIP must be received at the time of the actual CIP application to the PGME Office requesting consideration for the specific Fellowship.  Second, evidence of acceptance into a graduate degree program from the School of Graduate Studies must be provided to the Director of the CIP once it is received.  

The deadline to apply for both Fellowships is November 30, 2013.  For more information, please contact the Postgraduate Awards Administrator, Barb Heffernan.

Winter Holidays

Published Thu Nov 07/13 8:00am.
The PGME Office has received some questions from residents about the dates for the December holiday breaks.  Residents should check with their individual programs, as dates can vary by program.  All residents are entitled to at least five consecutive days off during a twelve day period that encompasses Christmas Day, New Year's Day, and two full weekends.  These five days off are to account for the three statutory holidays (Christmas Day, Boxing Day, New Year's Day) and two weekend days. 

Nearing the End of a Long Life: Pain Management for the Elderly

Published Mon Nov 04/13 11:00am.
Presented by: Dr. Ray Viola

0800-0900
Friday November 8, 2013
36 Barrie Street

In this session you will learn:
1. symptom prevalence in the elderly with advanced illness
2. an approach to pain assessment in the elderly
3. considerations when prescribing analgesics/co-analgesics
4. an approach to analgesic use in renal insufficiency
5. options for non-pharmacologic pain treatment

Presentation slides attached here  
Flyer attached.

Bruce Visiting Scholar, Dr. Jeremy Nicholson to lecture on personalized medicine - November 6

Published Fri Oct 25/13 3:00pm.
I am very pleased to tell you about a very special lecture,  “Personalized Medicine in the 21st Century” to be delivered by this year’s Bruce Visiting Scholar, Dr. Jeremy Nicholson from Imperial College London.
 
Professor Nicholson is one of the world’s foremost experts in personalized medicine, particularly in understanding how gene contributions and environmental factors come together to determine human health, disease risk profile, and responses, good or bad, to therapy.
 
Wednesday, November 6th, 2013 at 5:00PM
School of Medicine Building, 15 Arch St.
Queen’s University ROOM 032A (Lower Level)

All welcome
-
Free admission.
Refreshments at 4:30PM.
 
Professor Nicholson’s visit to Queen’s is possible because of a very generous gift by Dr. Andrew and Margaret Bruce that established the Dr. Andrew and Margaret Bruce Endowment for Visiting Scholars in Surgical Innovation.
 
Delivering effective and safe therapies perfectly tailored to the biological fingerprint of the individual is one of the great challenges for 21st century medicine. In advancing personalized therapies, investigators like Professor Nicholson are also providing a roadmap to more general healthcare and lifestyle management.
 
This is a terrific opportunity to hear from a global leader on this important topic and I hope that you will join us on November 6th.
 
 
Richard

Richard K. Reznick, MD, MEd, FRCSC, FACS, FRCSEd (hon), FRCSI (hon)
Dean, Faculty of Health Sciences
CEO, Southeastern Ontario Academic Medical Organization

Special Lecture on November 6

Published Tue Oct 22/13 1:00pm.
You are invited to attend a special upcoming lecture, “Personalized Medicine in the 21st Century” to be delivered by this year’s Bruce Visiting Scholar, Dr. Jeremy Nicholson from Imperial College London.
 
Professor Nicholson is one of the world’s foremost experts in personalized medicine, particularly in understanding how gene contributions and environmental factors come together to determine human health, disease risk profile, and responses, good or bad, to therapy.
 
Wednesday, November 6th, 2013
5:00PM
School of Medicine Building
15 Arch St.
Queen’s University
ROOM 032A
(Lower Level)
All welcome
-
Free admission.
Refreshments at 4:30PM.
 
Professor Nicholson’s visit to Queen’s is possible because of a very generous gift by Dr. Andrew and Margaret Bruce that established the Dr. Andrew and Margaret Bruce Endowment for Visiting Scholars in Surgical Innovation.
 
Delivering effective and safe therapies perfectly tailored to the biological fingerprint of the individual is one of the great challenges for 21st century medicine. In advancing personalized therapies, investigators like Professor Nicholson are also providing a roadmap to more general healthcare and lifestyle management.
 
This is a terrific opportunity to hear from a global leader on this important topic and we hope that you will join us on November 6th.

Health Care Team Challenge™ 2013

Published Thu Oct 17/13 3:00pm.

Mr. Smith is a long-haul truck driver who recently had both feet amputated due to complications from diabetes. When his oxygen saturation levels drop below normal, a chest x-ray and ECG are ordered – procedures refused by Mr. Smith because “what’s the point?” As a health care professional, how do we provide the best care for this patient? What does he need? What does he want? What are the priorities? No one provider can solve all of Mr. Smith’s problems, so how do we work best as a team?

These are the kinds of challenges health care providers face on a regular basis, and a possible scenario that students in Medicine, Nursing, Occupational Therapy, Physiotherapy, Clinical Psychology and Theology could see at the 5th annual Health Care Team Challenge™ (HCTC) at Queen’s.

Hosted annually by the Office of Interprofessional Education and Practice (OIPEP) (http://healthsci.queensu.ca/education/oipep/), the HCTC allows students to work together to address the issues and challenges of a virtual patient, presented to them three weeks prior to the competition. Assigned to interprofessional teams, students collaborate to develop a comprehensive, patient-centered care plan that encompasses the needs and priorities of the patient, while learning about their own professions and others on the team. The interprofessional competencies they rely on can be found in the National Interprofessional Competency Framework. (http://www.cihc.ca/files/CIHC_IPCompetenciesShort_Feb1210.pdf )

Queen’s has a proud history in promoting interprofessional collaboration. Since 2010, we have had a strong representation at the provincial and national Health Care Team Challenge™, where our students continue to develop their skills alongside teams from many other schools across the country. Since the inaugural national HCTC in 2010, our teams have represented Queen’s in Hamilton, Toronto and, most recently, Vancouver, gaining new perspectives on interprofessional collaboration as it applies to different diverse settings across Canada.

Experience with interprofessional teamwork is not only an asset for future health care providers, but is increasingly viewed as a pre-requisite. Where best to learn about working interprofessionally than in a team with a virtual case? As a participant of the 1st Queen’s HCTC, I can attest to the fact that this competition has allowed me to view health care as part of a bigger picture, one where experiential learning allows participants to understand the benefits and challenges of working in a collaborative health care team. My experiences have helped guide my approach to the challenges I see every day as an x-ray technologist, working with patients who have similar problems to Mr. Smith.

This year’s teams have now “met” their virtual patient and are now preparing to present their comprehensive care plan at the challenge on November 21st. What better way to learn of the benefits and challenges of interprofessional collaboration than to see how our students work together on a difficult case? The event will be held at 6:00pm on November 21st at the new medical building. 

 Come out to support your fellow colleagues and witness interprofessional collaboration in action!

-Ralph Yeung


The Queen’s 2012 winning team, with their faculty mentor, participated in the national Health Care Team Challenge in Vancouver in June 2013.

 

Autoimmune Polyendocrine Syndromes

Published Thu Oct 17/13 10:00am.
Presented by: Dr. Ingrid Harle

0800-0900
Friday October 18, 2013
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. Understand the specific clinical, pathological and epidemiological features of these syndromes
2. Familiarize oneself with proposed pathogenesis of these syndromes
3. Identify potential therapies
4. Identify considerations for long term follow up

Flyer attached.
Sign-in Sheet attached here
Evaulation form attached here.

Autoimmune Polyendocrine Syndromes

Published Thu Oct 17/13 10:00am.
Presented by: Dr. Ingrid Harle

0800-0900
Friday October 18, 2013
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. Understand the specific clinical, pathological and epidemiological features of these syndromes
2. Familiarize oneself with proposed pathogenesis of these syndromes
3. Identify potential therapies
4. Identify considerations for long term follow up

Flyer attached.
Sign-in Sheet attached here
Evaulation form attached here.

PALS registration closed

Published Thu Oct 10/13 1:00pm.

Our course is now full. Our next PALS course will be in the Spring. Please check back later for more details.

Robert Reid honoured by Royal College UK

Published Fri Oct 04/13 12:00pm.

Robert Reid (Obstetrics and Gynaecology) has been named a Fellow ad Eundem by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) in the United Kingdom, only the fourth Canadian to have earned this honour in the past 25 years.

“I'm really very honoured to have received this recognition, and in particular, to do so in the footsteps of (Queen’s professor emeritus) Dr. James Low, who was similarly recognized a number of years ago,” says Dr. Reid. “The RCOG in the UK, like Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada, remains a strong advocate for women's rights and is a leader in international women's health.”

The honour of Fellow ad Eundem is given to individuals who, although not members of the RCOG, have contributed to the advancement of the science and practice of obstetrics and gynaecology, and who have furthered the medical specialty.

Dr. Reid’s research interests include premenstrual syndrome, infertility, menopause and related mood disorders. The RCOG encourages the study and advancement of the science and practice of obstetrics and gynaecology through postgraduate medical education, training development, and the publication of clinical guidelines and reports on aspects of the specialty and service provision.

The RCOG Global Health Unit works with other international organizations to help lower maternal morbidity and mortality in under-resourced countries.

Research at Providence Care focuses on measuring impacts of dementia; topic at Open Minds Across Canada Mental Health Symposia

Published Fri Oct 04/13 10:00am.

Research underway at Providence Care may one day make it easier for clinicians to measure the impacts of dementia, helping people with Alzheimer’s and other related conditions get the treatment they need sooner.

Amber Knuff, a Queen’s University researcher at Providence Care’s Mental Health Services (MHS), is leading a study with geriatric psychiatrist, Dr. Dallas Seitz, that aims to identify an objective way to measure the behavioural and psychological changes associated with various forms of dementia,with a focus on examining symptoms of agitation . Currently, clinicians rely on descriptive observations, made either by family members or staff in hospitals or long-term care homes.

“We’re looking for ways of quantifying these changes that are more reliable, more accurate,” says Knuff. Working with nursing staff and inpatients at MHS, the study uses actigraph units, which are non-invasive sensors worn by patients to measure gross motor activity, and are often used in sleep research. Knuff is hoping to find correlations between the actigraph data and information provided by the care teams that can then be used to accurately determine the extent of a patient’s behavioural and psychological symptoms associated with dementia.

Knuff is presenting her research to date at Open Minds Across Canada Mental Health Symposia 2013, which takes place this week at MHS.  The event is intended to link researchers with members of the public, who are then able to ask questions and provide insight.

Symposia topics include: Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents, A Brief Overview of Psychiatry, and Innovations in Research in Geriatric Psychiatry.

The Open Minds Across Canada Mental Health Symposia is organized by Health Minds Canada (HMC) and sponsored by the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research, the Ontario Trillium Foundation, SickKids Foundation, and Queen’s University.

#HPM: Social Media and Palliative Care

Published Fri Sep 27/13 11:00am.
Presented by: Dr. Stephen Singh

0800-0900
Friday October 4, 2013
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. Understand the basics of blogs, Facebook and Twitter
2. List some reasons why patients and families use these modalities
3. List some reasons why physicians may consider using these modalities in a professional capacity

Flyer attached.

Reznick named honourary member of CAGS

Published Thu Sep 26/13 5:00am.

Richard Reznick, Queen’s dean of Health Sciences has become a Honourary Member of the Canadian Association of General Surgeons (CAGS). Dr. Reznick received his award, in recognition of outstanding service to the association, from CAGS President, Dr. Garth Warnock at the 2013 Canadian Surgery Forum in Ottawa.

Along with CAGS, Dr. Reznick has held nearly sixty different roles with almost three-dozen professional organizations and associations in the province of Ontario, and nationally, in Canada, the United States and the United Kingdom and others. This has included committee work, board and executive governance positions.

Dr. Reznick is one of the world leaders in surgical education and has helped transform postgraduate medical education and advanced education in specialized medical training.

The Canadian Association of General Surgeons is the only national organization representing the interests of General Surgeons in Canada.  CAGS offers a wide range of educational opportunities, supports surgical research, and provides a forum for Canadian general surgeons to discuss the issues that challenge General Surgeons today.

Mindfulness Training Program

Published Tue Sep 24/13 3:00pm.
You are invited to a six-week Mindfulness Training Program.  This is an opportunity to develop a fundamental capacity of mind that is relevant to both professional competence and personal health. It addresses how you think, and how you feel.  More information is available at:  http://meds.queensu.ca/education/postgraduate/wellness/mbsr  An information session will be held on October 15th at 6:30pm, Richardson Amphitheatre.

Courses, courses, courses!

Published Mon Sep 23/13 3:00pm.
Registration for ACLS, PALS, and TNCC are now available. Please check out our website for more information. Please note: all course registrations are on a first-come, first-serve basis. Space is limited so please register early.

Therapeutic Touch as an Integrative Therapy for Palliative Care

Published Mon Sep 23/13 12:00pm.
Presented by: Alison Cooke, BSA(Hon), BEd
Practicing/teaching Therapeutic Touch for 17 years

0800-0900
Friday September 27, 2013
36 Barrie Street

Goals/Objectives

1. To describe how TT provides relaxation , reduced anxiety and reduced pain
2. To provide research references proving the efficacy of TT in inhibiting the growth of bone cancer cells
3. To demonstrate a TT treatment
4. To demonstrate ways in which TT can be used for self-care

Flyer attached

Three faculty members become Fellows of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences

Published Fri Sep 20/13 4:00pm.

Roger Deeley
Three Queen’s professors and respected researchers have been formally inducted as fellows of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences (CAHS).

Roger Deeley (Pathology and Molecular Medicine), Jacalyn Duffin (Medicine, Philosophy, History, Nursing, Education), and Elizabeth Eisenhauer (Oncology) were chosen based on their demonstrated leadership, creativity, competence and commitment to the health sciences.

Dr. Deeley is the Vice-Dean of Research for the Faculty of Health Sciences, Director of the Queen’s Cancer Research Institute, and a professor of pathology & molecular medicine, oncology, and biomedical & molecular sciences. His research focus on multidrug resistance proteins (MRP) has been widely recognized as a major contribution to understanding the causes of resistance to cancer chemotherapy.

“I’m very honoured to have been elected as a Fellow of the Academy and I look forward to participating in the activities of the Academy in its support and promotion of health research in Canada,” says Dr. Deeley.


Jacalyn Duffin

Dr. Duffin currently holds the Hannah Chair of the History of Medicine and is a cross-appointed professor in five academic departments at Queen’s. She has been president of the Canadian Society for the History of Medicine as well as the American Association for the History of Medicine. Last year she was appointed a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. Her research interests include medicine and religion, disease concepts, medical technology and historical activism.

“It is a big honour to have my work recognized by the CAHS,” says Dr. Duffin. “I view it as a tribute from leaders of the profession to the abiding relevance of historical research within clinical medicine.”





Elizabeth Eisenhauer
For Dr. Eisenhauer, Queen’s has been the home of her medical education as well as her research career. Since graduating from Queen’s medical school in 1976, she joined the NCIC Clinical Trials Group(NCIC CTG) in 1982 where until 2012, she oversaw a national program of clinical trials using new cancer drugs. She has also worked to improve the way clinical studies in cancer patients are designed and conducted. Since 2012 she has been Head of the Department of Oncology at Queen's and in July 2013 also became Interim Director of the NCIC CTG.

"I am honoured to have been elected to the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences,” says Dr. Eisenhauer. “I look forward to contributing to the work of the Academy in helping to shape the future of health care in Canada."

“Election to the CAHS is one of the highest honours for health sciences researchers in Canada,” says Dr. Steven Liss, Vice-Principal (Research). “The contributions of Drs. Deeley, Duffin, and Eisenhauer have had widespread impact both in Canada and internationally, and as a community of scholars, the Academy will benefit greatly from their experience and expertise.”

The new fellows were inducted into the CAHS on September 19 during a dinner ceremony at its Annual General Meeting in Ottawa.

Dr. Joel Parlow reappointed Head, Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine

Published Fri Sep 20/13 1:00pm.

Joel Parlow has been reappointed Head of the Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine at Queen’s University, Hotel Dieu Hospital, Kingston General Hospital and Providence Care Centre for a second term from July 1, 2013 to June 30, 2018. This reappointment is announced by Alan Harrison, Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) at Queen’s, and Sherri McCullough, Tom Buchanan and Glen Wood, Chairs of the Boards of Directors for Hotel Dieu Hospital, Kingston General Hospital and Providence Care Centre. Dr. Parlow has been Head of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine since 2008.

In 1982, Dr. Parlow received his MD from the University of Toronto. He undertook his internship training at McGill University followed by specialty training in anesthesiology at Queen's. He subsequently completed a one-year clinical research fellowship in the field of cardiovascular anesthesia at the Université Claude Bernard in Lyon, France. In 1993, Dr. Parlow received his Masters of Science degree in pharmacology and toxicology from Queen's and he was appointed to the Department of Anesthesiology at the rank of Assistant Professor. He was cross-appointed to the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology in 1995, promoted to the rank of Associate Professor in 1998 and to Professor in 2011.

A skilled anesthesiologist, Dr. Parlow is internationally respected for his research into perioperative cardiovascular control. He has led and collaborated in scientific investigations and projects which have brought more than1 million dollars in funding to Queen’s. He has also published 88 peer-reviewed publications and abstracts. He has lectured across the country and has twice been a visiting faculty member with the International Education Foundation program affiliated with the National University of Rwanda.

Dr. Parlow has held a number of administrative positions within the Department and he has been involved with more than two dozen committees at the university, hospital, provincial and national levels, including the Association of Canadian University Departments of Anesthesia (ACUDA), where he has recently completed a two year term as the Secretary-Treasurer, the POISE-2 International Steering Committee, and is a board member of the International Education Foundation of the Canadian Anesthesiologists’ Society.

Palliative Sedation

Published Fri Sep 13/13 3:45pm.
Presented by: Dr. Deborah Dudgeon

0800-0900
Friday September 20, 2013
Host site: 36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. To outline the indications and aims for palliative sedation
2. To discuss drugs, administraion and monitoring
3. To review the Canadian Society of Palliative Care Physician framework for continous palliative sedation

Flyer attached here.
Sign-in sheet
Evaluation Form

Palliative Sedation

Published Fri Sep 13/13 3:00pm.
Presented by: Dr. Deborah Dudgeon

0800-0900
Friday September 20, 2013
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. To outline the indications and aims for palliative sedation
2. To discuss drugs, administraion and monitoring
3. To review the Canadian Society of Palliative Care Physician framework for continous palliative sedation

Flyer attached here.

Good Luck, Dr. James Villamere!

Published Thu Sep 12/13 2:00pm.

Best of luck to our resident, Dr. James Villamere, who will be representing Queen’s University at the National Laparoscopic Suture Challenge held by the Canadian Association of General Surgeons in Ottawa on Thursday, September 19, 2013! Good luck, James!

1st QuARMS students arrive at Queen’s

Published Wed Sep 11/13 12:00pm.

Queen’s University welcomed the first 10 students to a program unique among Canadian universities welcomed campus last week. The Queen’s University Accelerated Route to Medical School (QuARMS) program allows 10 School of Medicine students to finish their medical doctorate just six years after graduating from high school, two years earlier than the traditional educational pathway.

Over 500 students across Canada indicated an interest in the QuARMS program and, after an application and interview process, 10 were selected for admission.

“We believe that Canada has extraordinary high school students who are fully capable of success in an accelerated track to becoming a medical doctor,” says Richard Reznick, dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences. “Queen's is the perfect place for QuARMS. Being a medium-sized university with a relatively small medical school (100 students), ensures the QuARMS students have an excellent support network of faculty, staff and, of course, their classmates. We are delighted to welcome them to Queen's.”

The 10 students were selected based on their commitment to service, academic ability, leadership qualities, diverse interests and a high level of maturity.

The students are now enrolled in the Faculty of Arts and Science for two years of pre-med study. A place in the medical school class has been held for them on the condition they maintain very high academic standing. Concurrently they will receive special extra-curricular training from the School of Medicine to further prepare them to enter medical school.

Richard van Wylick appointed Director, Faculty Development

Published Mon Sep 09/13 7:00pm.

Richard van Wylick has been appointed Director, Faculty Development for Queen’s Faculty of Health Sciences. This appointment is announced by Richard Reznick, Dean, Faculty of Health Sciences.

Dr. van Wylick brings a broad base of expertise to the this role with nearly twenty years of experience at Queen’s University, Kingston General Hospital and Hotel Dieu Hospital as an educator, clinician,  scholar and advocate for his profession. 

He arrived at Queen’s University as student and received a Doctor of Medicine in 1994. Dr. van Wylick did his residency training in pediatrics at Queen’s, and became a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada in 1998.

Since 1998, Dr. van Wylick has held academic and clinical appointments of increasing responsibility at Queen’s and its’ partner hospital and regional sites. He is presently Medical Director of the Children’s Outpatient Centre and Director of Pediatric Cystic Fibrosis Program at Hotel Dieu Hospital (Kingston). At Kingston General Hospital he is Pediatric Medical Director, Sexual Assault/Domestic Violence Program. He has also been the Deputy Head, Department of Pediatrics at Queen’s  and a member of the attending and consulting staff at regional sites in Kingston, Oakville and Moose Factory.  

Along with his new role, Dr. van Wylick is the Director of Student Progress, Promotion and Remediation for Queen’s School of Medicine; and Director of the Integrated Clerkship. He teaches residents and medical students on a variety of pediatric topics and received an Aesculapian Society Lectureship Award in 2012.

Dr. van Wylick has contributed to advancing education, practice and patient-care in his profession on numerous fronts. He has delivered more than 60 invited lectures locally, regionally and nationally on a broad spectrum of pediatric training practice and issues such as identifying and addressing child abuse, and supporting healthy child development. He has participated in numerous studies including a provincial maternal and child health report for the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long Term Care; and two connected to medical education delivery and faculty development process funded through Southeastern Ontario Academic Medical Organization (SEAMO) Education Innovation Grants. He has also been a member or chair of more than 30 university and hospital committees.

Writing Competition

Published Mon Sep 09/13 3:00pm.
Do you enjoy writing?  Medical students and residents are invited to submit reflective essays, poetry, or short fiction exploring the intersection of mental health and the humanities to the Dalhousie Department of Psychiatry Annual Student Writing Competition.  One entry in each category (medical student, postgraduate trainee) will be selected to receive a $100 cash prize.  Download the flyer for more information.

David Lillicrap among Queen's professors elected to Royal Society of Canada

Published Sun Sep 08/13 8:00pm.

Dr. David Lillicrap, a professor in the Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine has been elected to the Royal Society of Canada. Dr. Lillicrap is  an internationally-renowned researcher focused on the genetic basis of hemophilia and von Willebrand disease (VWD). His work has led to innovative strategies for the diagnosis and treatment of the world’s most commonly-inherited bleeding diseases. Lillicrap’s novel findings, now being applied to clinical care worldwide, are improving the quality of life for patients with inherited bleeding disorders.

He joins a record seven Queen’s University professors named among the newest fellows of the Royal Society of Canada (RSC) today, more than in any other single year.

“It is remarkable in a university of our medium size to have seven distinguished faculty members elected to the Royal Society of Canada in one year. Each of these individuals has made important contributions to their fields, and I congratulate them on this well-deserved honour,” says Principal Daniel Woolf, who currently serves on the RSC Executive Committee. “Moreover, fellowship in the three academies of the RSC is a much more meaningful and enduring measure of Queen's University's individual and collective achievements in research than are rankings exercises, which are too easily distorted by size of institution."
Fellowship in the RSC is one of the highest recognitions for Canadian academics in the arts, humanities, and the social and natural sciences. The seven new Queen’s fellows come from across four of the university’s faculties—Arts and Science, Engineering, Health Sciences, and Law. Their research touches on a wide range of important issues and topics, such as the needs of vulnerable children and youth involved in the justice system, the diagnosis and treatment of hemophilia, and the global diffusion of Renaissance and Baroque Art

“This has been an outstanding year for Queen’s," says Dr. Steven Liss, Vice-Principal (Research). "We are very proud of the accomplishments of our new fellows and look forward to a long and continued relationship with the Royal Society of Canada.”

The Royal Society of Canada was established under an Act of Parliament in 1882 as Canada’s national academy. It helps to promote Canadian research, scholarly accomplishment and advises governments, non-governmental organizations and Canadians on matters of public interest. Fellows are elected by their peers for outstanding contributions to the natural and social sciences, in the arts, and in the humanities.

The other new fellows, who will be recognized at an RSC banquet in November in Banff, are:

Gauvin Bailey (Art History) has enriched understanding of the global diffusion of Renaissance and Baroque Art with his foundational work on the hybrid cultures of Latin America and Asia. His research challenges convention not only by comparing geographic regions in new ways, but also through the use of multidisciplinary methodologies to contextualize art internationally. From 2010-2011, Bailey held the prestigious Guggenheim Fellowship.

Nicholas Bala (Law) is a family law scholar and international expert on children and parents involved in the justice system. Uniquely interdisciplinary and collaborative, he studies the needs and rights of children and youth, such as adolescent offenders or those in the middle of a high-conflict separation, as well as issues related to vulnerable adults, including victims of spousal violence and family litigants unable to afford lawyers.

Praveen Jain (Electrical and Computer Enginerring) is a professor of electrical and computer engineering and a Canada Research Chair. His most significant work is concerned with the advancement of high frequency power conversion technology for its use in the space, telecommunications, computer and induction melting industries

Philip Jessop (Chemistry) pioneered a new field in chemical engineering and invented the first “switchable solvents.” His revolutionary contributions have resulted in technologies that address human needs while reducing environmental impact. Jessop has furthered these technologies through his role at GreenCentre Canada.

F.P. Lock (English) is a leading authority on 18th century British literature, politics, and ideas. His two-volume biography of Edmund Burke has been acclaimed as the “definitive study” of the most intellectual of British politicians. With his distinctive marrying of primary research and interpretive acumen, Lock’s work is hailed for its sophisticated rhetorical and intellectual analysis, and for its attention to historical and cultural contexts.

Carlos Prado (Philosophy) has made substantial contributions to contemporary philosophy and to applied ethics. His publications on Michel Foucault have contributed enormously to demonstrating the relevance and significance of the French philosopher’s work for contemporary Anglo-American philosophy. Professor Prado’s publications on suicide in dire medical circumstances have enlarged the debate about suicide to include its rationality as well as its ethical justification.

The Royal Society of Canada was established under an Act of Parliament in 1882 as Canada’s national academy. It helps promote Canadian research, scholarly accomplishment and advises governments, non-governmental organizations and Canadians on matters of public interest.

Public Health Learning Tools Challenge

Published Fri Sep 06/13 10:00am.
Want to make an impact towards a healthier future for all?  Residents are invited to submit entries in a new challenge supported by AFMC and the Public Health Agency of Canada.  Create a cartoon, video, game, or other creative teaching tool that addresses a key area of public health or preventive medicine and you could win one of thirteen available cash prizes.  The first place prize is worth $2,500!  Apply at www.afmc.ca/publichealth.

The Role of Buprenorphine in the Management of Complex Chronic Pain

Published Wed Sep 04/13 3:00pm.

Presented by: Dr. Scott Duggan, Assistant Professor, Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine

0800-0900
Friday September 13, 2013
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:

1.  To review the pharmacology of buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone combinations
2.  To identify patients that may be appropriate candidates for buprenorphine therapy
3.  To examine the role of buprenorphine therapy in the management of opioid induced hyperalgesia
4.  To introduce treatment options and services available through the Hotel Dieu Chronic Pain Clinic

Flyer attached here.

GIDRU researchers receive key funding from Crohn's and Colitis Foundation

Published Thu Aug 29/13 7:00am.
Stephen Vanner and Alan Lomax  have been awarded $370,000 from the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of Canada to help them and their colleagues continue their cutting edge research in this often debilitating illness.

Dr. Vanner is the director of the Gastrointestinal Diseases Research Unit at Queen’s University and Kingston General Hospital and a leading researcher in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

“We believe the new findings of our research will help patients better understand how pain medications and the chronic stress related to their illness can interact to generate pain,” says Dr. Vanner. “We hope to provide new approaches for patients and doctors to better treat this pain.”

The abdominal pain is associated with IBD is often a debilitating symptom for patients and can result in emotional suffering and physical disability. The pain can be difficult to treat because the underlying cause is often unknown.

Drs. Vanner and Lomax’s study not only examines what factors can decrease pain, but also how, in certain situations, these same factors can worsen pain. This knowledge can help doctors in understanding the pain mechanisms in IBD and guide them through treatment options.

“We are very grateful to the CCFC for providing this opportunity to pursue these important questions and we are dedicated to making a difference in the lives of IBD patients,” adds Dr. Vanner.

Welcome

Published Mon Aug 26/13 9:00am.
Welcome to the Class of 2017! We look forward to meeting you all in September!

Simpson begins term as Canadian Medical Association's president-elect

Published Wed Aug 21/13 10:00am.

Dr. Christopher Simpson

Christopher Simpson was acclaimed as president-elect of the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) yesterday at its annual meeting in Calgary.

In March, Dr. Simpson, Professor and Chief of Cardiology at Queen’s University, and Medical Director of the Cardiac Program at Kingston General Hospital and Hotel Dieu, was voted CMA’s president-elect nominee. Yesterday’s acclamation marks the official confirmation of his election and beginning of his term.

"I am very impressed with the Canadian Medical Association's health care transformation initiative and the association's recent efforts to engage Canadians in the discussion on the social determinants of health on a national level," says Dr. Simpson. "I am honored to have been selected by my peers as CMA's president-elect for 2013-2014."

After serving term as president-elect, Dr. Simpson will take over as the CMA’s president from Louis Francesutti in August 2014.

In addition to his work as a clinician, researcher and educator, Dr. Simpson’s career has been marked by important contributions to public policy, particularly around wait times and access to health care.

He is chair of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society's standing committee on health policy and advocacy, which developed a comprehensive set of wait-time benchmarks for all cardiovascular consultations, tests and procedures. He also chairs the Canadian Wait Time Alliance, an organization that advocates for timely, quality care for Canadians.

IRLS - Register Now

Published Thu Aug 08/13 2:00pm.
Registration for the International Resident Leadership Summit (IRLS) is now open.  The IRLS is a unique global forum attended by Canadian and international residents, and more information is available from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada website.

Douglas Cook receives prestigious fellowship in neurosurgery

Published Fri Aug 02/13 3:00pm.


Dr. Douglas James Cook (Department of Surgery) has been announced as the recipient of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons (CNS) 2013 Vascular Fellowship. Dr. Cook was the only Canadian named to receive one of six prestigious fellowships from this worldwide professional body.

Dr. Cook is a new faculty member, starting at Queen’s in May 2013 as an assistant professor in the Department of Surgery - Division of Neurosurgery. He recently graduated from the University of Toronto Department of Neurosurgery and has undertaken a fellowship in cerebrovascular surgery with Dr. Gary Steinberg at Stanford University. He is undertaking studies in stroke recovery in large animal models of stroke using functional MRI, invasive electrophysiology, quantitative motor outcomes with the KINARM robot and neuronal tracing studies. His goal is to understand cortical reorganization and plasticity following stroke for the purposes of targeting neurorestorative therapies and developing novel approaches to improve outcomes in chronic stroke.

The Congress of Neurological Surgeons (CNS) has more than 8,000 members worldwide and provides global leadership in advancing neurosurgery by inspiring and facilitating scientific discovery and its translation into clinical practice.  The fellowship awards are a strategic investment by the Congress on behalf of the field. The CNS offers fellowship awards for residents, neurosurgeons who have recently completed training, and established neurosurgeons alike. For more information, visit www.cns.org.

Medical Student Research Showcase

Published Fri Aug 02/13 6:00am.

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS OPEN AS OF AUGUST 12, 2013 (08:00AM)


Queen’s School of Medicine is proud to host the 2nd Annual Medical Student Research Showcase on September 26, 2013.  The Medical Student Research Showcase Committee invites abstracts from students for oral and poster presentations related to their research activities starting on August 12, 2013.  Please visit our NEW Community on Medtech for all information on this event.  Please note that all applications must be submitted via the new electronic process.

https://meds.queensu.ca/central/community/researchshowcase

Stephen Archer selected to vet groundbreaking research

Published Thu Jul 25/13 1:00pm.

Department of Medicine Head, Stephen Archer has been selected by the New England Journal of Medicine to editorialize two, international, randomized clinical trials describing the benefits of a new type of drug to treat two forms of pulmonary hypertension (PH).

The findings were published by an international team of researchers, lead by researchers in Germany. This editorial is a critical appraisal of this new treatment and Dr. Archer, a cardiologist and Head of Medicine at Queen’s University, was selected based on his expertise in the field, both clinically and as a basic scientist. The opportunity to provide context for new therapies like this one is only afforded to the top experts in the field.

Riociguat is the first in a new class of drugs fast-tracked by the Federal Drug Administration. If approved for treatment of pulmonary hypertension, it would join other oral drugs as treatments for this disease. Riociguat is also poised to be the first to treat chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

Currently the only treatments for pulmonary hypertension are extremely expensive and provide no remedy.  The treatment for pulmonary hypertension is a surgical procedure which can cure the condition but is available only at specialized centres.

Patients in both studies were randomized to treatment with Riociguat or placebo.  After 12 weeks their walking distance over six minutes was measured and that measurement was used to assess the effect of the drug. The six patients given Riociguat were able to walk between 30 to 45 metres further before becoming short of breath than those given the placebo. In Dr. Archer’s opinion, the drug definitely has benefits, although it is not likely to cure the disease.

“It’s an honour to be asked to render an opinion on this important research,” says Dr. Archer. Once the drug is approved its use will be contextualized in guideline documents, which help specialized physicians decide which PH drug to prescribe.

Riociguat will hopefully be available in Canada in the near future, and it will be used close to home in the pulmonary hypertension clinic at Queen’s.

Psychiatry research centre earns national accreditation

Published Wed Jul 24/13 8:00pm.

By Anne Craig, Communications Officer


Queen's University's Department of Psychiatry and Providence Care, a leading provider of mental health care in southern Ontario, have been granted Accredited Clinical Research Centre status by the Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT).

The accreditation was awarded to the clinical research site based on the research center’s program strength and caliber of the research team.

“This accreditation acknowledges the good work done at the site,” says Roumen Milev, head of the Department of Psychiatry. “We have a strong team and this type of recognition rewards us for our research. We have been working for many years on multi-site trials, working with teams of researchers right across Canada and internationally to help people living with various psychiatric disorders.” read full story...

Forensic pathologist brings expertise to Queen's and Kingston

Published Mon Jul 22/13 7:00am.

By Anita Jansman

Kris Cunningham is the newest faculty member in the School of Medicine’s Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine. He brings with him a wealth of experience and education to the science of forensic and cardiovascular pathology.

He comes from the University of Toronto, where he was a forensic and cardiovascular pathologist and medical director at the Provincial Forensic Pathology Unit of the Ontario Forensic Pathology Service.

From the unique perspective of forensic pathology, Dr. Cunningham feels he can contribute to the well-being of surviving relatives of patients who have lost their lives to genetic forms of cardiovascular disease. Read full story...

Humber River Hospital signs Affiliation Agreement with Queen’s University:

Published Wed Jul 17/13 1:00pm.


Queen’s University and Humber River Hospital in Toronto, and have reached a formal affiliation agreement that will see students, residents and clinical fellows from Queen’s University‘s Medical School rotate through all of the acute care service disciplines provided at the hospital.  The first rotation will be in the hospital’s Women’s and Children’s Program starting this August.

"The Faculty of Health Sciences at Queen’s University is excited about the opportunities presented by working more closely with Humber River Hospital,” says Dr. Richard Reznick, Professor and Dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences at Queen's. “We welcome Humber’s emerging strategy that is focusing increasing attention on educating health professionals for the future. We look forward to our engagement on the vital issue of advancing interprofessional education and care. We are also excited about the potential opportunities that may be provided to our learners when they take advantage of the impressive new facilities being constructed for the HRH Redevelopment project."

“Humber River is uniquely positioned to be an institution of learning for medical students at all levels,” notes Dr. Rueben Devlin, President & CEO of Humber River Hospital. “The educational opportunities that present themselves at Humber River Hospital are varied and numerous.  It’s a very challenging, yet very rewarding, rotation for our Queen’s students, and we are delighted to formalize our partnership with the University.”

“This is great news for Humber River Hospital, and reflects well on the expertise of our medical staff both as clinicians and teachers,” explains Dr. Ray Martin, Humber’s Vice President of Medical & Academic Affairs. “It speaks volumes that an organization as impressive as Queen’s University chose Humber as its Toronto partner. It is a strong endorsement of the quality of our Medical Education Program, and the instruction medical students receive at our hospital.”

About Humber River Hospital:

Humber River Hospital is one of Canada's largest regional acute care hospitals, serving a catchment area of more than 850,000 people in the northwest Greater Toronto Area. The hospital currently operates on three sites with a total of 549 beds, 3,000 staff, approximately 600 physicians and 400 volunteers. Also affiliated with the University of Toronto, the hospital is home to Ontario's first Centre of Excellence for laparoscopic bariatric surgery, has the GTA’s third largest cancer program, and is the first community hospital in Canada to perform robotic surgery.

Humber River Hospital is currently building North America's first fully digital hospital, one that the organization plans to make a technological and environmental showcase.  Learn more at www.hrrh.ca/redevelopment.

Ruth Wilson named president of WONCA North America

Published Wed Jul 17/13 12:00pm.

After 35 years as a family doctor, it would be understandable if Queen’s University professor Ruth Wilson was starting to wind down her career. But quite the opposite is true.

 

 

 









At the recent world conference of the World Organization of Family Doctors (WONCA), Dr. Wilson was named the president of the organization’s North American region. The position marks the highest level of achievement for Dr. Wilson, whose resumé is bursting with honours, awards and nominations.

“My role as president is to help promote better health care in the world,” says Dr. Wilson. “Canada has a lot to offer in terms of primary health care and family medicine and we can share our expertise and resources with countries that are still improving their health care systems.”

Dr. Wilson’s election comes after she was recognized in 2010 as one of Canada’s top 100 most powerful women by the Women’s Executive Network. She also won the triennial Five Star Doctor Award from WONCA for excellence as a health care provider.

It took some time for Dr. Wilson to find her calling – her parents were clergy in the United Church. Despite her strong background in the church, she determined studying medicine was her calling. Her first jobs included working in the northern communities of British Columbia and Newfoundland before being recruited to Queen’s in 1989 to head the Queen’s Moose Factory program. Now called the Queen’s Weeneebayko Program, the initiative provides opportunities for Queen’s medical students to work in Northern Ontario as part of their training.

In 1991, at the age of 39, Dr. Wilson became the head of the Department of Family Medicine and spent 10 years in that role. After conquering that professional goal, she began looking for new challenges and found it on the policy side of medicine. She served from 2001-2004 as the Chair of the Ontario Family Health Network.

“I changed my focus at that point as we were facing a 10 per cent cut in medical school enrollment which hit family medicine the hardest. There was a definite lack of doctors. Colleagues and I developed a nine point plan to reform public health care, which led to the implementation of the family health team model currently in use in Ontario.”

While continuing her practice and teaching at Queen’s, Dr. Wilson again was looking for her next challenge. She accepted a part time job at Providence Care as the vice-president, Medical and Academic Affairs. Again she is focused on policies and procedures to make patients’ experience in the health care system more positive.

During her impressive career, Dr. Wilson found time to raise five children with doctor husband and fellow Queen’s professor Ian Casson right by her side – actually right in the same office. Drs. Wilson and Casson share a practice, which allowed them to be there for their children as they grew up. She says she loves the opportunity to work with him every day and talk about their shared passion – medicine.

With so many years of experience under her belt, Dr. Wilson has sage advice for new students: “First you need to be a really good doctor and over the years, your other skills will develop. Second, say yes to things, there are going to be lots of great opportunities presented to you. Embrace them.”

For more information about Dr. Wilson’s election as president of WONCA’s North American region award visit the WONCA website.

Summer Resident Newsletter

Published Mon Jul 08/13 2:00pm.
The Summer Resident Newsletter is now online and available for viewing or download.  All PGME newsletters are available for download on the Postgraduate website under the 'newsletters' tab.

Queen's health researchers awarded $5.35 million

Published Thu Jul 04/13 1:00pm.
Ten Queen’s University researchers were awarded over $5.35 million from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) during the 2012/13 fiscal term. The funding is being used to support the creation of new scientific knowledge that could lead to better understanding of illnesses and disorders and, ultimately, better health of Canadians.

“The support of the CIHR is vital to our researchers,” says Steven Liss, Vice-Principal (Research). “Queen’s is a leader in health research and this funding will help our researchers remain on the leading edge of those breakthroughs.”

The following Queen’s researchers have received funding:

Sameh Basta (Biomedical and Molecular Sciences) – Dr. Basta is investigating how viral infections influence our immune response to other stimuli. This will help in the development of new therapeutic approaches to alleviate ill health.

Ian Chin-Sang (Biology) – Many diseases, including Parkinson’s disease and epilepsy, are caused by malfunctions of the nervous system. Dr. Chin-Sang’s research is focused on understanding cell movements in the brain, in particular cells of the nervous system.

Meredith Chivers (Psychology) – One third of women are affected by problems surrounding sexual arousal and desire. Dr. Chivers’ research studies the relationships between sexual arousal, sexual desire and sexual health in women. This will create gender-specific knowledge about the causes of sexual dysfunctions.

Colleen Davison and William Pickett (Public Health Sciences) – Drs. Davison and Pickett are researching how family factors including communication and organization affect a child’s health. This includes physical, social, emotional and spiritual health.

Randy Flanagan (Psychology; Centre for Neuroscience Studies) –Dr. Flanagan is researching how human brains plan and control object manipulation tasks. He will examine where information about the object’s weight is stored in the brain and then how the brain processes multiple actions.

Ana Johnson (Public Health Sciences; Centre for Health Services and Policy Research) – Dr. Johnson is researching treatment for bleeding often caused by new medication given to the elderly suffering from atrial fibrillation. This heart condition can cause strokes. She is examining elderly patients who are on these drugs and are hospitalized with bleeding to determine the course of treatment, the costs associated with that treatment and patient outcomes.

Linda Levesque (Public Health Sciences; Centre for Health Services and Policy Research) – Dr. Levesque is studying the impact of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programs, designed to reduce the occurrence of genital warts and cervical cancer, in Ontario. Although the programs have been offered free-of-charge to all Grade 8 girls since 2007, there continues to be controversy about the real-world effects of the vaccine on this young population. Dr. Levesque’s study aims to address critical questions to help young girls and their parents make more informed decisions about HPV vaccination.

Martin Petkovich (Biomedical and Molecular Sciences; Cancer Research Institute) – Dr. Petkovich is examining whether  inhibiting or removing retinoic acid can prevent or reverse the formation of bone in soft tissues, called ectopic bone formation, which can lead to cardiovascular disease and death. Currently there are few treatments for this type of bone formation.

Robert Ross (School of Kinesiology and Health Studies) – New research suggests preventing weight gain is actually more effective than a strategy of weight reduction. Dr. Ross is investigating behaviour change techniques and encouraging goal setting, planning and working toward a healthier lifestyle to help stem the rise in obesity.

Graeme Smith (Obstetrics and Gynaecology) – A significant number of heart attacks occur in women in the absence of risk factors including high blood pressure, smoking or diabetes. Dr. Smith has created the Maternal Health Clinic which has been set up to follow women with pre-eclampsia, often a determining factor in cardiovascular risk. His research will develop new ways to screen and treat these women.

Visit the CIHR website for more information about the most recent grant announcements.

National Assessment Collaboration Examination

Published Thu Jul 04/13 10:00am.
The National Assessment Collaboration (NAC) examination has been made mandatory for all International Medical Graduates (IMG) applying for first-year residency positions in Ontario that start July 1, 2015.  In addition, the eligibility criteria for the Medical Council of Canada Evaluating Examination (MCCEE) has also been changed to improve access to the NAC examination.  Details are available on the PGME website here.
 

Patriotic “singing” bridge and has a Queen’s Med school connection

Published Fri Jun 28/13 1:00pm.

It’s Canada Day on Monday. Long weekend. Family gatherings. Barbecues, picnics, fireworks, red and white attire, red maple leaf on flags, temporarily painted on faces, and many renditions of Oh Canada.

John Sanfilippo (left) and Jared Coleman photo by Janina Enrile For the Whig-Standard

But Kingston might be the only city in Canada to have a bridge, the LaSalle Causeway, that sings the national anthem - thanks to the creative talents of John Sanfilippo (owner of Tyton Sound) and Jared Coleman (owner of Shoreline Productions). The pair was recently featured in a Kingston Whig-Standard article.

Kingston’s ‘patriotic’ bridge has a connection to the School of Medicine.  John is Tony Sanfilippo’s (Associate Dean Undergraduate Medical Education) son.

Enjoy the video and happy Canada Day!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V1VkvB_YLpI

Petrof’s “RePOOPulate” one of five World-changing ideas

Published Fri Jun 28/13 1:00pm.

An innovative treatment for C. difficile bacterial infections developed by Dr. Elaine Petroff (Queen’s University, Kingston General Hospital) and Dr. Emma Allen-Vercoe (University of Guelph) has been tagged by Maclean’s as one of Canada’s “five world changing ideas”


Dr. Petrof, an assistant professor in the Department of Medicine and in the Gastrointestinal Disease Research Unit (GIDRU) at Kingston General Hospital and Dr. Allen-Vercoe collaborated to create, RePOOPulate a synthetic stool that can be administered to patients suffering from chronic C. difficile.
The new synthetic stool was formed from 33 types of bacteria at the University of Guelph’s Robogut a laboratory replica of the human colon. Dr. Petrof performed transplants with RePOOPulate on two elderly patients who were both symptom-free within three days.

RePOOPulate was also recognized n the current special issue of Maclean’s magazine “100 Ideas, Inventions & Discoveries That Will Change the World”, that looks at 100 of today’s most cutting-edge ideas and inventions.

Integrating Palliative Care into the Management of COPD Patients

Published Thu Jun 27/13 12:00pm.

Presented by: Dr. Ingrid Harle

0800-0900
Friday June 28, 2013
36 Barrie Street

Flyer attached

Dr. Stephen D. Bagg reappointed Head, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Published Mon Jun 24/13 8:00am.

Stephen Bagg has been reappointed Head of the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Queen’s University, Hotel Dieu Hospital, Kingston General Hospital  and Providence Care Centre for a second term from July 1, 2013 to June 30, 2018. Dr. Bagg has served in this capacity since 2008. These reappointments are announced by Alan Harrison, Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) at Queen’s,  and Sherri McCullough, Tom Buchanan and Glen Wood, Chairs of the Boards of Directors for Hotel Dieu Hospital, Kingston General Hospital and Providence Care Centre.

Dr. Bagg first came to Queen's University as a graduate student following completion of a BSc (kinesiology) in 1980 from the University of Guelph. He received an MSc (anatomy) in 1982 and an MD in 1986 from Queen’s. Dr. Bagg joined the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation as an Assistant Professor in 1990 and he was subsequently promoted to the rank of Associate Professor in 2003.  Since 1990, Dr. Bagg has also served as the Medical Director of the St. Mary’s of the Lake Stroke Rehabilitation Service. From 1999 to 2003 he was Medical Director St. Mary’s of the Lake Sports Medicine Centre and from 1988 to 2011 he was also the hockey team doctor for the Queen’s Golden Gaels.

Dr. Bagg’s clinical, educational and research activities have been focused primarily on stroke rehabilitation, including the development and evaluation of novel approaches such as the use of botulinum neurotoxin for spasticity after stroke, recovery using the KINARM robotic device and mental imaging. He has contributed to Queen’s Faculty of Health Sciences education enterprise at both the undergraduate and postgraduate levels as Program Director, and he has furthered the scholarly activity in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation as Director of Research. Dr. Bagg is a highly regarded lecturer delivering courses, clinical skills training and workshops in the Schools of Medicine, Nursing and Rehabilitation Therapy. In 2011, he received the Queen’s Faculty of Health Sciences Clinical Skills Teaching Award.

Dr. Bagg has helped to advance his profession as a volunteer on number of national and provincial committees, including as Chair of the Canadian Association of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Stroke Special Interest Group and Chair of the Royal College Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Examination Committee.

Dr. Robert J. Connelly appointed Head, Department of Paediatrics

Published Fri Jun 21/13 10:00am.

Robert Connelly has been appointed Head, Department of Paediatrics at Queen’s University, Hotel Dieu Hospital and Kingston General Hospital for an initial term from July 1, 2013 to June 30, 2018. These appointments are announced by Alan Harrison, Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) at Queen’s, and Sherri McCullough and Tom Buchanan, Chairs of the Boards of Directors for Hotel Dieu and Kingston General Hospitals.

Dr. Connelly obtained his Bachelor of Science in physical therapy in 1986 and his Doctor of Medicine in 1990 from the University of Toronto followed by a rotating internship at the University of Toronto and Toronto East General Hospital. He completed specialty training at Dalhousie University in paediatrics in 1995 and in neonatal-perinatal medicine in 1998. Dr. Connelly was appointed as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Paediatrics at Queen’s and as a neonatologist at Kingston General Hospital in 1999. He has been the Medical Director of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit since 2005 and the Interim Program Medical Director for Paediatrics at Kingston General and Hotel Dieu Hospitals as well as Deputy Head of Queen’s Department of Paediatrics since 2012. Dr. Connelly received his Master of Business Administration from Queen’s in 2012 and he has been promoted to the rank of Associate Professor effective July 1, 2013.

Dr. Connelly has published articles, presented at national and international conferences and participated in many multi-centered clinical studies in neonatology. He has worked to advance his specialty as a member of the National Neonatal Resuscitation Executive Committee of the Canadian Paediatric Society and a member of the Specialty Committee for Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine at the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. At a local level, Dr. Connelly has served on numerous departmental, university and hospital committees and he has been the Treasurer for the Clinical Teachers Association of Queen’s since 2009.

Having been extensively involved in both undergraduate and postgraduate medical education, Dr. Connelly has been recognized for his contributions as a recipient of both the Aesculapian Society Lectureship Award and the Faculty of Health Sciences Education Award. He served as Paediatric Residency Program Director from 2000 to 2005 and he is involved in numerous continuing professional development initiatives. He was a member of the Paediatric Exam Committee and Chair of the MCQ Test Committee at the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons and he remains active as a Royal College examiner in paediatrics.

In making this announcement, the Provost and Board Chairs would like to express their appreciation to Dr. Kimberly Dow for providing interim leadership of the Department over the past 10 months.

Dr. Graeme N. Smith appointed Head, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Published Fri Jun 21/13 10:00am.

Graeme Smith has been appointed Head, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at Queen’s University, Hotel Dieu Hospital and Kingston General Hospital for an initial term from July 1, 2013 to June 30, 2018. These appointments are announced by Alan Harrison, Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) at Queen’s, and Sherri McCullough and Tom Buchanan, Chairs of the Boards of Directors for Hotel Dieu and Kingston General Hospitals.

After obtaining a combined MD/PhD at the University of Western Ontario in 1992, Dr. Smith completed his residency training in obstetrics and gynaecology at Queen’s University. This was followed by a two-year fellowship in maternal-fetal medicine at the University of Toronto. Dr. Smith joined the Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at Queen’s University in 1999 as an Assistant Professor. He was granted tenure and promoted to the rank of Associate Professor in 2005 and to the rank of Professor in 2008. He holds cross-appointments in the Departments of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences and Diagnostic Radiology.

A clinician scientist, Dr. Smith established and is Director of the Queen’s Perinatal Research Unit that combines basic science and clinical research laboratories. His research focuses on pre-eclampsia as a marker of cardiovascular disease and potential therapeutics for its treatment. His primary research interests pertain to adverse pregnancy outcomes as a marker of future maternal health. He developed the Mothers Health Education, Research and Screening (MotHERS) Program to improve maternal health and outcomes.

Dr. Smith has over 100 peer-reviewed publications and he has been/is involved in over 50 peer-reviewed grant funded studies. He has supervised over twelve graduate students, both MSc and PhD, and dozens of medical student and resident and research trainees. Dr. Smith’s research has been funded by a wide variety of sources including continuous funding since 2000 from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR). He has also been the recipient of numerous research awards including a CIHR New Investigators Award, a Premier’s Research Excellence Award, the Association of Professors of Obstetrics and Gynaecology of Canada Researcher of the Year Award as well as the Basmajian Research Award and the Chancellor’s Research Award from Queen’s University.

In making this announcement, the Provost and Board Chairs would like to express their appreciation to Dr. Michael McGrath for his excellent leadership and contributions during his eight-year tenure as Head of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

Recognizing our best: 2013 Faculty of Health Sciences Education Award, Ron Wigle Award, and H.F. Pross Award

Published Fri Jun 14/13 2:45pm.

Queen’s Faculty of Health Sciences has recognized three exceptional faculty members with the presentation of its most prestigious academic awards:

Dr. Margaret Jamieson, School of Rehabilitation Therapy received the 2013 Faculty of Health Sciences Education Award.

Dr. Robert McGraw, School of Medicine received the 2013 H.F. Pross Educational Technology Award.
 
Dr. James Wilson, School of Medicine was presented with 2013 Ron Wigle Mentorship Award.


Dr. Jamieson, an Associate Professor in the Occupational Therapy Program, was cited as ”a role model and an ideal educator in the Faculty of Health Sciences and Queen’s University”. Her nomination and citation highlighted how she “created a transformative learning experience for her students by bringing the best of evidence-based practice to life in her classroom” and how she did so “on a foundation of respect, acceptance, support, cultural awareness and appreciation of diversity.”

Dr. Hugh Pross personally presented Dr. McGraw with his award. Dr. McGraw, was lauded as an “innovator, scholar and mentor who has contributed to advancing technology-enchanced medical education at Queen’s University and across Canada.” His award citation stated “It was through Dr. McGraw’s vision that Queen’s new medical building has one of the top high-fidelity simulation centres in North America.”  Dr. McGraw is an Associate Professor in the Department Emergency Medicine and Director of the Clinical Simulation Centre, School of Medicine

Dr. Ron Wigle, attended the reception and presented Dr. Wilson with his award. Dr. Wilson who headed the Department of Urology for fifteen years was said to ‘personify the notion of a mentor at Queen’s University.’  He was cited for his exceptional integrity and compassion in his roles as a physician, colleague and mentor. He was also recognized for being “selfless in holding the success of his department first” and for being “a role model as a consummate professional devoting his time to the betterment of others, faculty, students, staff and patients”.


Dr. Leslie Flynn, Interim Vice-Dean (Education), Faculty of Health Sciences  and Dr. Margaret Jamieson

Dr. Leslie Flynn, Interim Vice-Dean (Education), Faculty of Health Sciences and Dr. Margaret Jamieson


 

 














Leslie Flynn, Dr. Robert (Bob) McGraw, Dr. Hugh F. Pross


 

 

 












Dr. Ross Walker, Associate Dean, Post-Graduate Medical Education, Dr. James Wilson, and Dr. Ron Wigle

 

Queen’s Meds Dragon Boat team heading to Toronto competition

Published Tue Jun 11/13 10:45am.

After months of intense training, 22 medical students are eager to race in the 25th Toronto International Dragon Boat Race Festival later this month. The annual international race and festival is expected to draw 200 teams and 5000 athletes from around the world.

Founded in 2010 by two medical students, the Queen’s School of Medicine’s dragon boat team is currently coached by Peng Yu and Amanda Murdoch. Team members have been preparing since September, doing twice-weekly strength training and water practices since April.

The team has competed twice before in the Toronto international race, winning the gold medal in their division in 2011 and finishing two tiers higher in 2012. Team members are striving to advance even further in this year’s competition.

In addition to surpassing last year’s performance, the team’s objectives are to model healthy living through physical activity, promote a sense of community and to enter premier competitions.

“With increasing focus on the mental well-being of post-secondary students, we believe that participation in physical activity is a great way to achieve balance in our academic lives,” says Yan Xu, coordinator of the team. “We want to promote a healthy community and build the sort of resiliency that was outlined in the report of the Principal’s Commission on Mental Health.”

Active in over 40 countries, Dragon boat racing is an ancient Chinese sport that requires intense physical fitness, teamwork and commitment. A typical team is comprised of approximately 20 paddlers, one caller, and one sweep to steer the boat down the waterway.

Fall 2013 MCCQE-II Application Now Available

Published Fri Jun 07/13 1:00pm.
The Medical Council of Canada is pleased to confirm that the fall 2013 MCCQE Part II application session is now open. The two-day examination will be held on Saturday and Sunday, 26 and 27 October, 2013.
 
IMPORTANT:  In order to be eligible for the fall 2013 MCCQE Part II, candidates must satisfactorily complete a minimum of 12 months (52 weeks) of postgraduate clinical medical training no later than June 30, 2013.
 
  • Candidates will have 5 weeks until the main application deadline date of July 10 to apply to the fall 2013 MCCQE Part II with the base examination fee of $2,190.
  • A 50% late fee will apply after this date. The application fee will be $3,285 (includes a 50% late fee) after July 10th and up until the close of application on July 23rd.
Family Medicine eligible residents:  Please consult the New Certification Examination in Family Medicine and the MCCQE Part II.
 
How to Apply in the new MCC system
 
Eligible candidates must log into our new physiciansapply.ca system and activate their account to apply to the MCCQE Part II.
 
In order to activate their account, candidates simply go to physiciansapply.ca and click “Login”. For optimal viewing and navigation, physiciansapply.ca should be accessed using the following web browsers:

  • Google Chrome
  • Firefox
  • Internet Explorer 8 or 9
  • Safari
The new system is not designed to be accessed through a mobile device at this time. A tablet-compatible version of the system will be available in the near future.
 
Candidates should use their MCC-Online username and password to log into physiciansapply.ca for the first time. Once logged in, the account will need to be initialized. This process may take a bit of time to complete.
 
Candidates may also experience some formatting and usability issues, including:

  • The photo/signature will not be visible on their physiciansapply.ca account dashboard.
  • The “Create a new message” link on the right-hand (third) panel of the dashboard is not functional; candidates must use the link in the middle (second) panel to send a new message to the MCC.
The MCC will continue to work as quickly as possible to fix these issues.
 
Should candidates have any questions or concerns, they may contact the MCC Service Desk right away:

www.mcc.ca/contact-us/
Telephone: 613-520-2240
Fax: 613-248-5234
service@mcc.ca

Canadian collaborative leadership project receives $2.7M from Ontario Government

Published Fri Jun 07/13 2:00am.

 A national collaborative leadership education partnership between the University of Toronto, University of British Columbia, Northern Ontario School of Medicine, Université Laval and, has received $2.7 million over three years from the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long Term Care (MOHLTC).  In addition to the substantial support from the five University partners and in kind contributions of UBC and Université Laval, this grant facilitates international recognition of innovation in health leadership program development across Canada and the world.

The Canadian Interprofessional Health Leadership Collaborative (CIHLC) was chosen by the U.S. Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) Board on Global Health as one of four innovation collaborative projects from around the world. The CIHLC will grow and pilot “leadership mobilization” ideas, outlined in the Lancet Commission Report, Health Professionals for a New Century: Transforming Education to Strengthen Health Systems in an Interdependent World.  CIHLC’s vision is collaborative leadership for health system change to globally transform education and health.

In the 21st century, health systems have become so complex that they cannot be managed effectively by a few traditional leaders. Therefore, the CIHLC will develop, implement, evaluate and disseminate an evidence-based and commercially viable collaborative leadership education programs. Targeted at emerging leaders in health care, the program will define and confer the competencies required to lead system change and confront complex health challenges.

The leads for the five-university collaborative include:

Sarita Verma, Deputy Dean, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto

Maria Tassone, Director, Centre for Interprofessional Education, University of Toronto

David Marsh, Associate Dean, Community Engagement, Northern Ontario School of Medicine

Sue Berry, Executive Director, Integrated Clinical Learning, Northern Ontario School of Medicine

Margo Paterson, Professor, School of Rehabilitation Therapy, Queen’s University

Lesley Bainbridge, Director, Interprofessional Education, Faculty of Medicine University of British Columbia

Emmanuelle Careau, Professor, Rehabilitation Department, Université Laval

“It is significant that the province of Ontario has recognized the importance of patient and family-centred care. We are very appreciative of this opportunity to work with our colleagues from across the country to increase our understanding of this complex topic of collaborative leadership” says Dr. Margo Paterson, the Queen’s Lead and Dr. Rosemary Brander, Director of the Office of Interprofessional Education and Practice who is the alternate for Queen’s.

The CIHLC sees collaborative leadership as a critical enabler of patient-centred care. Every team member brings unique skills, experiences, and perspectives that should be effectively utilized.

Faculty of Health Sciences researchers receive funding from CFI

Published Wed Jun 05/13 5:00pm.
Three Faculty of Health Sciences researchers were among six from Queen's University receiving 1.3 million from the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI). The projects ranged from improving treatment for Parkinson’s disease, to developing new ways to detect blood cancer

“The CFI, through the Leaders Opportunity Fund (LOF), has provided us with an excellent mechanism for attracting and retaining top-flight researchers,” says Vice-Principal (Research) Steven Liss. “As a result of this competition, six Queen’s researchers will receive the funding required to develop innovative infrastructure that will provide the enriched research training environments necessary for leading-edge research. “


The following Queen's researchers received LOF funding:


Ron Levy (Surgery) – With a goal of improving treatment for Parkinson’s disease, Dr. Levy studies changes in the brain attributed to the disease. He is using his funding to purchase new equipment for his lab, including a high performance computer, and to hire a computer technician.

Alberto Neder (School of Medicine) – Dr. Neder’s lab is the first in the world to study the entire oxygen pathway through the body during exercise. He will use the funding to purchase new laboratory infrastructure to expand his research program. He aims to develop new rehabilitative strategies for patients with age-related diseases including chronic heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Michael Rauh (Pathology and Molecular Medicine) – Dr. Rauh will explore next-generation technologies that will allow earlier detection of blood cancer which causes debilitating and life-threatening fatigue, bleeding, infections and can progress to leukemia. The funding is being used to create a blood cancer research laboratory at Queen’s.

Steven Fischer (School of Kinesiology and Health Studies) – With a focus on creating a healthier Canada, Dr. Fischer is using his grant to open a Movement for Performance Biomechanics and Ergonomics Laboratory at Queen’s. He will use human movement research to reduce and prevent work-related injuries.

Jean-Michel Nunzi (Chemistry/Physics) – To help alleviate the burden of rising health care budgets, Dr. Nunzi is developing a new point-of-care (POC) device that can be applied to a wide range of medical testing applications. Currently, POC devices are used for one type of testing, like a blood glucose meter for patients with diabetes. The new device will be able to analyze two different properties of the blood, increasing the power of the POC to provide more information.

Linda Booij (Psychology) – Dr. Booij is developing a biological test to identify people at risk of major depressions and aggression. Such a test would help to arrange early treatment options that could help with these disorders. Her goal is to improve the health of Ontarians and reduce the burden on the province’s economy when it comes to mental illness. The funding will be used to purchase computers and specific software designed to analyze the data.

Dr. Graeme N. Smith appointed Head, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Published Tue Jun 04/13 5:00pm.

Graeme Smith has been appointed Head, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at Queen’s University, Hotel Dieu Hospital and Kingston General Hospital for an initial term from July 1, 2013 to June 30, 2018. These appointments are announced by Alan Harrison, Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) at Queen’s, and Sherri McCullough and Tom Buchanan, Chairs of the Boards of Directors for Hotel Dieu and Kingston General Hospitals.

After obtaining a combined MD/PhD at the University of Western Ontario in 1992, Dr. Smith completed his residency training in obstetrics and gynaecology at Queen’s University. This was followed by a two-year fellowship in maternal-fetal medicine at the University of Toronto. Dr. Smith joined the Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at Queen’s University in 1999 as an Assistant Professor. He was granted tenure and promoted to the rank of Associate Professor in 2005 and to the rank of Professor in 2008. He holds cross-appointments in the Departments of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences and Diagnostic Radiology.

A clinician scientist, Dr. Smith established and is Director of the Queen’s Perinatal Research Unit that combines basic science and clinical research laboratories. His research focuses on pre-eclampsia as a marker of cardiovascular disease and potential therapeutics for its treatment. His primary research interests pertain to adverse pregnancy outcomes as a marker of future maternal health. He developed the Mothers Health Education, Research and Screening (MotHERS) Program to improve maternal health and outcomes.

Dr. Smith has over 100 peer-reviewed publications and he has been/is involved in over 50 peer-reviewed grant funded studies. He has supervised over twelve graduate students, both MSc and PhD, and dozens of medical student and resident and research trainees. Dr. Smith’s research has been funded by a wide variety of sources including continuous funding since 2000 from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR). He has also been the recipient of numerous research awards including a CIHR New Investigators Award, a Premier’s Research Excellence Award, the Association of Professors of Obstetrics and Gynaecology of Canada Researcher of the Year Award as well as the Basmajian Research Award and the Chancellor’s Research Award from Queen’s University.

School of Rehabilitation Therapy director wins highest honor for a Canadian occupational therapist

Published Tue Jun 04/13 11:00am.

Dr. Marcia Finlayson Vice-Dean (Heath Sciences) and Director of the School of Rehabilitation Therapy is the 2013 recipient of the highest honour a Canadian occupational therapist (OT) can receive – the Muriel Driver Memorial Lectureship Award (http://www.caot.ca/default.asp?pageid=1357 ) – and she plans to use it to shake things up.

“It’s a real honour because it is recognition from your peers. The award gives you the ability to go and focus on something you think is really important. ,” says Dr. Finlayson, Vice Dean (Health Sciences) and Director of Queen’s School of Rehabilitation Therapy.

(SPECIAL NOTE: Dr. Finlayson will repeat her Muriel Driver Memorial Lecture on June 11, noon, at the Medical Building 15 Arch St. Rm.132)

Dr. Finlayson’s lecture, which she delivered May 31 at the Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists (CAOT) Conference in Victoria, focused on being a change agent, which is one of the seven roles outlined for the profession by the CAOT. The core role of an occupational therapist is to be an expert enabling occupation; the change agent role is one of several supporting roles. Dr. Finlayson examined what being a change agent means for the field.

“I am challenging the profession to take a more holistic and nuanced view of what that role should look like and what we need to do in our education and research programs to be effective change agents,” she says. “Currently, the role of change agent focuses on advocacy, communicating the benefits of occupational therapy and advocating for occupational engagement. I don’t think that it is enough – we have to do more.”

A holistic perspective, Dr. Finlayson says, would include articulating problems, initiating change with the right people, managing a change process over time, and effectively galvanizing people and taking on leadership roles.

Dr. Finlayson uses the example of working with multiple sclerosis patients – her area of expertise. Reducing mobility issues may include more than prescribing a walker or wheelchair, and training a person to use it. It could mean addressing larger issues, such as accessibility problems on city transit and in taxicabs. That could mean working with city staff and planners, or working to implement training programs to educate taxi drivers about how to disassemble and safely lift a wheelchair into a trunk.  These types of strategies offer the possibility of making system-wide changes that influence more than an individual client. 

The award, administered by the CAOT, is also significant for its connection to Queen’s. Its namesake, Muriel Driver, was instrumental in starting the occupational therapy program and School of Rehabilitation at Queen’s in 1967.  She served first as a senior lecturer and then as an assistant professor until her death in 1972. Three other Queen’s professors have won the Muriel Driver award over the years.

Rendezvous success!

Published Mon Jun 03/13 2:00pm.
A very special thank you to Ruth Johnson and Anne Prouse for representing the Clinical
Simulation Centre at the Science Rendezvous. It was a huge success! Anne at Science Rendezvous

Queen’s family doctors being trained at Oshawa site to double this summer

Published Thu May 30/13 9:00am.

The Department of Family Medicine will welcome its second year of new residents at its Oshawa site this summer, doubling the number of family doctors in the Queen’s Bowmanville-Oshawa-Lakeridge (QBOL) program.

“Establishing comprehensive education and research partnerships outside of Kingston is a cornerstone of our 2012-2016 Strategic Plan,” says Dr. Richard Reznick, Dean, Faculty of Health Sciences. “The QBOL site is the latest example of a fantastic partnership between Queen's University and Lakeridge Health.”

In 2012, eight first-year residents from the Department of Family Medicine at Queen’s University trained at QBOL. In July this year, those students will transition to the second year of their residency while eight new first-year residents will begin their training at Lakeridge Health’s Oshawa and Bowmanville sites, as well as local clinics.

Dr. Wei-Hsi Pang, a family doctor in Courtice and QBOL Site Director, has already started to notice the benefits of having the medical residents in the community. “We’re teaching them, but they’re also teaching us, bringing with them the latest medical knowledge from Queen’s,” says Dr. Pang. “It makes us all stronger, and the result is better health care for families here.”

In addition to real-world training under the guidance of experienced doctors, residents hone their skills with state-of-the-art simulation equipment in the Lakeridge Health Education and Research Network (LHEARN) Centre. Queen’s Faculty of Health Sciences contributed a $1million capital investment to establish the facility in 2011.

“Our partnership with Queen’s is bringing family doctors to Oshawa and Bowmanville to train, and it’s putting us on the map as a great place for medical students to get hands-on experience,” says Kevin Empey, President and CEO of Lakeridge Health.

The Use of Intrathecal Infusion for Pain in Palliative Care

Published Mon May 27/13 3:00pm.

Presented by: Melissa Touw, APN

0800-0900
Friday May 31, 2013
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:

1. To review intrathecal analgesia and role in pain management 
2. To identify appropriate patients for receiving intrathecal analgesia 
3. 
To discuss the feasibility of use in a Palliative Care Program

Flyer attached

Outstanding students and faculty recognized at School of Medicine Convocation

Published Fri May 24/13 11:00am.

Academic achievements of special distinction and great teachers were recognized on Thursday afternoon as Queen’s Medicine Class of 2013 celebrated their Convocation.

Dr. Susan Moffatt, an Associate Professor in Department of Medicine (Respirology) & Critical Care Program, received the R.W. Connell Award. This award is given to a faculty member who, in the opinion of the graduating class, has made the greatest contributions to their education during the entire MD program.   Dr. Moffatt has been involved in multiple aspects of curriculum for many years and, this past year, directed the development and initial implementation of three very successful Clerkship Curriculum courses.

The Class of 2013 also awarded the Resident Prize in Teaching to Dr. Barry Chan. Dr. Chan is a PGY3 resident in internal medicine and is a highly respected teacher of undergraduate medical students and junior residents at Queen’s. He is also the recipient of this year’s Professional Association of Internes and Residents of Ontario (PAIRO) Clinical Teaching Award. Dr. Chan will continue his teaching and post-graduate studies in general internal medicine residency at Queen’s.

Graduates whose academic work was particularly outstanding were recognized with a number of special awards from the School of Medicine.

Class of 2013 School of Medicine award winners:

DR. MATTHEW CWINN

  • David Edward Mundell Prize in Orthopaedic Surgery

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DR. SUSAN FRANCHUK

  • Rattray Scholarship in Family Medicine

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DR. SABRA GIBBENS

  • Henry Kaufman Memorial Prize – to an outstanding student who has shown great human understanding and responsibility towards the needs of the patient

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DR. ZACHARY KING

  • Dr. Ian Maxwell Gourley Prize in Pediatrics.

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DR. LAUREN LACROIX      

  • Sarah and Henry Scott Memorial Prize in Surgery

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DR. TAEHYOUNG LEE

  • Nathan E. Berry Prize in Urology

------

DR. RANO MATTA  [RAHN-ah Matta]

  • Rattray Bequest for highest academic standing in Urology

------

DR. RAHUL NAYAK [RAOUL NAYyak]

  • Queen’s Medal in Surgery

---

DR. CURTIS NICKEL

  • Dr. Osler Briggs Dickinson Scholarship in Surgery

------

DR. MACARINZE OJIAKU

  • Dr. S.L. Fransman Prize in Diagnostic Radiology

-----

DR. MERCEDES PILKINGTON

  • Dr. Jennie Gillespie Drennan Medical Scholarship - to a female medical student of high academic standing in fourth year pursuing further studies in Medicine or Surgery at Queen's University.

DR. KEVIN REN      

  • Michael Brown Memorial Award in Oncology

-----

DR. LESLEY ROBERTS

  • Dr. and Mrs. Sydney P. Schiff Award in Surgery

-----

DR. DEREK SARGENT       

  • T.R. Sullivan Memorial Award in Surgery

----

DR. ABHIMANYU SETHI

  • Philips Macdonnell Memorial Award - to an excellent student in fourth year pursuing Family Medicine at Queen’s

------

DR. SARAH SIMPSON       

  • The Dr. Mark Cohen Award in Ophthalmology

-------

DR. MATTHEW WHITE

  • The Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Prize

-----

DR. DAVID YUE

  • Professor's Prize in Paediatrics

-----

DR. PAXTON BACH

  • Edgar Forrester Scholarship for highest standing in medicine
  • Hannah Washburn Polson Prize for proficiency in Medicine, Surgery, and Obstetrics

-----

DR. DANAE KRAHN           

  • Professor's Prize in Anaesthesia 
  • Professor's Prize in Family Medicine

-------

DR. ALURA RILEY

  • Appleton & Lange Book Prize for a student nominated by the School of Medicine
  • Mylks Medal in Obstetrics

-------

DR. HEATHER LAMB        

  • Dean Fowler Prize for highest standing in the final year
  • Mathews Medal for highest standing in Paediatrics
  • Professor's Prize in Emergency Medicine

------

DR. SARAH LEONARD      

  • Dr. Frederick C. Boyd Prize for excellence in final year (nominated by faculty)
  • Mathews Medal in Family Medicine
  • Virginia Parker Prize for Excellence in Psychiatry

-------

DR. KIERAN QUINN          

  • Endocrine Society Medical Student Achievement Award
  • Neil Currie Polson Memorial Prize for excellence in practice - Nominated by his teachers
  • Professor's Prize in Otolaryngology

-------

DR. PHILIP LAM

  • Bryan George Blair Memorial Prize for excellence in Internal Medicine
  • J. Delmar Blaine & Ethel G. Blaine, Scholarship and W.W. Near and Susan Near Prize for second highest standing throughout the course
  • Queen’s Medal in Medicine                                

------

DR. ALEX SUMMERS

  • Douglas Prize in Community Health and Epidemiology
  • Edgar Forrester Scholarship for second highest standing in 4th year
  • G.H. Ettinger Scholarship in Family Medicine                                    
  • Isobel McConville Prize - for highest standing in Obstetrics and Gynaecology
  • Professor's Prize in Community Health and Epidemiology

------

DR. SARAH LEBLANC

  • J. Delmar Blaine & Ethel G. Blaine, Scholarship for the highest overall standing in medical school
  • Pamela C. Williams Memorial Award for academic standing, fellowship, compassion for patients, significant extracurricular achievement, and community involvement.
  • Professor's Prize in Obstetrics and Gynaecology
  • Professor's Prize in Psychiatry
  • Professor's Prize in Surgery
  • W.W. Near and Susan Near Prize for highest standing throughout the course

ACLS courses coming up

Published Tue May 21/13 2:00pm.
Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) full and recertification courses are being offered at the CSC on June 1st and/or 2nd. Please check out our website for more details.

Early screenings key to diagnosing glaucoma

Published Thu May 16/13 12:00pm.
 New research is emphasizing the importance of regular screenings for glaucoma, a disease that deteriorates the optic nerve over time and is a leading cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. The onset of glaucoma is associated with a delay in diagnosing the disease.

A research team based at Hotel Dieu Hospital and led by Sanjay Sharma, a professor of Ophthalmology and Epidemiology at Queen’s University, examined 50 peer-reviewed articles and found support for the American Academy of Ophthalmology’s guidelines regarding screening frequency.

“The real problem with glaucoma is that it begins by affecting the far periphery of vision. So most patients don’t know that they have it until it progresses and begins to destroy their central vision,” says Dr. Sharma. “Nearly half of glaucoma cases remain undetected and half of those individuals who are diagnosed have very advanced disease on presentation.”Read full story...

Commissioner Available

Published Wed May 15/13 8:00am.
Residents who are finishing their programs this spring and applying for a CPSO Independent License are reminded that they will need to have their applications signed by a Commissioner for Taking Affidavits.  A Commissioner is available in the PGME Office; please contact Nicholas Snider to make an appointment by email or by calling 613-533-2543. 

Marijuana in Palliative Care: Useful Agent or Reefer Madness?

Published Tue May 14/13 3:00pm.

Presented by: Dr. Stephen Singh

0800-0900
Friday May 17, 2013
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. List the ways patients can take cannabinoids
2. Understand some indications for use such as nausea and pain
3. Understand how marijuana can be prescribed in Canada

Click on the words to get: Flyer, Sign-in Sheet and Evaluation Form
Presentation slides attached here.

Marijuana in Palliative Care: Useful Agent or Reefer Madness?

Published Tue May 14/13 3:00pm.

Presented by: Dr. Stephen Singh

0800-0900
Friday May 17, 2013
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. List the ways patients can take cannabinoids
2. Understand some indications for use such as nausea and pain
3. Understand how marijuana can be prescribed in Canada

Click on the words to get: FlyerSign-in Sheet and Evaluation Form     
Presentation slides attached here.

Med students shave for the cure

Published Fri May 03/13 1:00pm.

Students and faculty from the Queen’s University School of Medicine showed their colours during the inaugural Shave-for-the-Cure fundraiser in support of St. Baldrick’s Foundation, a charity dedicated to fighting childhood cancers.

Hosted by students from the classes of 2015 and 2016, the event smashed the preliminary goal of raising $6,500, with the final tally reaching $10,189. The event saw heads shaved, hair donated and many colourful dye jobs, while musical performances Zeyu Li, Elizabeth Clement, Josh Durbin, Joe Gabriel, and a huge closing set by The Rolling Kidney Stones rounded out the evening. Read more...

Stephen Hall receives grant from Canadian Cancer Society

Published Fri May 03/13 11:00am.

Queen’s University researcher Stephen Hall is examining whether follow-up visits for cancer survivors are working or if there is a better way to monitor patients’ health after cancer treatment.

In recognition of this innovative idea, the Canadian Cancer Society honoured Dr. Hall with a Quality of Life grant to study the most effective way to follow-up after treatments.

“Routine follow-up visits are a time-honoured practice, but maybe we can do better,” says Dr Hall, a head and neck oncology surgeon with the Department of Otolaryngology and the Division of Cancer Care & Epidemiology at Queen's. “If our current practice does not in fact always lead to better survival for patients, there must be a better option that takes the patient perspective into account. This is very expensive screening that can be improved taking into consideration the patients, the physicians and the health care system.”

Previous research about the practices of head and neck cancer specialists at Canadian cancer centers found no consensus on how long or how often patients should be seen, which patients should be seen more often or what patients actually need at their follow up appointment.

To build a better model for follow-up visits, Dr Hall and his team will try to understand the patient perspective of these visits. With this new funding, they will survey head and neck cancer survivors about their attitudes, needs, preferences, fears and expectation regarding routine follow-up care for three years after treatment.

“We know how important quality of life is to a patient during and after cancer treatment,” says Martin Kabat, CEO, Canadian Cancer Society, Ontario Division. “We’re pleased that, with the generous support of donors, we are able to fund this important study that considers the needs and fears of patients as they try to move beyond cancer.”

The ultimate goal is to find ways to improve the quality of life of people who have survived cancer by making the practice of follow-up more efficient, targeted and effective.

Prognosis - Not Always What It Seems!!

Published Thu May 02/13 12:00pm.

Presented by: Dr. Greg Patey

0800-0900
Friday May 3, 2013
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. Who cares?
2. Why does it matter?
3. How do we do it?
4. How good are we at it?

Flyer attached here.

Medical student's advocacy recognized with national award

Published Fri Apr 26/13 7:00am.

Queen’s medical student and global health advocate Paxton Bach (Meds’13) is the first recipient of the Sandra Banner Student Award for Leadership from the Canadian Residence Matching Service (CaRMS).

“It is an honour to be recognized with this award,” says Mr. Bach. “I have had the privilege of collaborating with an incredible collection of enthusiastic and capable individuals throughout my time in medical school. This award will allow me to further pursue my interests in global health and health advocacy.”

During his time at Queen’s, Mr. Bach was involved in a multitude of global health advocacy initiatives and held several leadership positions, including vice-president of global health for the Canadian Federation of Medical Students (CFMS). In addition, Mr. Bach has participated in student-run programs, helped to steer advocacy initiatives, and fostered improved global health opportunities for medical students across the country, including leading the Canadian delegations to the 2012 IFMSA meetings in Accra, Ghana and Mumbai, India. Read more...

Meds ’13 student wins CFPC National Scholarship

Published Thu Apr 25/13 9:00am.

Sarah LeBlanc (Meds’13) traces her interest in family medicine back to a personal experience. When she was applying to medical school in 2009, her grandfather was ill.

“I was able to see the wonderful work the family doctors were doing and the incredible impact they were having on his health and his well-being, as well as the well-being of our family during that time,” says Ms. LeBlanc.

Since then, Ms. LeBlanc has dedicated herself to family medicine, recently receiving the Canadian College of Family Physicians Student Scholarship. The scholarship recognizes students who are interested in pursuing a career in family medicine and have shown a commitment to the field during their time in medical school.

Ms. LeBlanc served as co-chair of the Queen’s Family Medicine Interest Group during her first two years of medical school. The student-run organization has been operating for the past five years to promote and educate medical students about family medicine training and career opportunities.

As co-chair, Ms. LeBlanc supported fellow executive members and helped set goals for the group. Her most notable work was helping organize the “Rural Bus Tour,” which took medical students to small towns in the area, exposing them to opportunities and facilities for family physicians in smaller communities.

Ms. LeBlanc is currently completing her final placements and will pursue a residency at Queen’s Family Medicine after graduating in May.

John Rossiter to receive PAIRO award for clinical teaching excellence

Published Tue Apr 16/13 3:00pm.


The Professional Association of Internes and Residents of Ontario (PAIRO) has announced that Dr. John Rossiter, Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, has won the 2013 PAIRO Excellence in Clinical Teaching Award for Queen’s University.

Dr. Rossiter has been teaching and training undergraduate medical students, residents and students in the life sciences since 1994. He is an Associate Professor in the Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine at Queen’s and since 2000 has been Program Director, of the Neuropathology Residency Training Program.  He has delivered more than 20 undergraduate and resident courses along with clerkship rounds in Pathology, Neurology, Ophthalmology, and Radiology. He has also been very active in the supervision of 16 graduate students in the basic and biomedical sciences.

The Excellence in Clinical Teaching Award was established in 1982 to publicly acknowledge the essential role that clinical teachers play in the training of new physicians.  Since it’s inception the award has become well recognized as a way for residents to acknowledge clinical teachers who have excelled in their role.

Dr. Rossiter will receive his award at a special dinner on May 10th.

Queen's head of medicine receives prestigious award

Published Tue Apr 16/13 6:00am.

Stephen Archer (Meds’81), one of the world’s top cardiologists and head of the Department of Medicine at Queen’s University, was recently awarded the prestigious Heart of Gold award for his volunteer work for the American Heart Association (AHA). In his role as president of the Chicagoland American Heart Association Board, Dr. Archer led the creation of Mission Lifeline, part of a national strategy to ensure patients receive timely care after a severe heart attack, prior to arriving at the hospital.

A network of 30 hospitals was created to ensure medical personnel have the equipment and training to deal with this life-threatening issue.

“It was both challenging and rewarding to see the network come to fruition over three years of intense work,” says Dr. Archer. “There were many collaborators whose participation was essential to the project’s success: from the Chicago Fire Department and emergency medical services to medical and leadership teams in each hospital. In the end, the project was a major political challenge that resulted in patients getting better care. Within a month of running Mission Lifeline, over 100 people had benefitted from the service.”

“Our project was a job many thought was impossible,” he says. “We knitted together 30 hospitals in Chicago to create one unified network serving 3 million people.”

A graduate of Queen’s University, Dr. Archer interned at the Royal Columbian Hospital in New Westminster, B.C., and completed his training in cardiology at the University of Minnesota. He later served as staff cardiologist and director of the Echocardiography Laboratory at the Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and as director of the Cardiology Division at the University of Alberta.

He was appointed head of medicine at Queen’s University, Hotel Dieu Hospital, Kingston General Hospital and Providence Care in November 2012.

Asking to Die: How Requests for Physician Assisted Suicide at End of Life Impact Physicians

Published Mon Apr 15/13 10:00am.

Presented by: Dr. Natalie Kondor

0800-0900
Friday April 19, 2013
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:

1) To review various reasons for and responses to patient requests 
2) To explore how such requests affect the physician-patient relationship

Flyer attached here.

Asking to Die: How Requests for Physician Assisted Suicide at End of Life Impact Physicians

Published Mon Apr 15/13 10:00am.

Presented by: Dr. Natalie Kondor

0800-0900
Friday April 19, 2013
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:

1) To review various reasons for and responses to patient requests 
2) To explore how such requests affect the physician-patient relationship

Flyer attached here.
Click here for Sign-in sheet.
Evaluation form attached here.
You may go to http://webcast.otn.ca/ to view the rounds via webcasting.



Science Rendezvous at the K-ROCK

Published Mon Apr 15/13 9:00am.

Ruth Johnson, Anne Prouse and Alicia Clark are taking the CSC on the road to participate in this year's Science Rendezvous on Saturday, May 11th. Bring the family and join them at the K-ROCK Centre. Older "kids" can try out the laparoscopic surgery trainers or airway trainers and wee ones will have fun learning how to make a homemade stethoscope. Science Rendezvous Poster

Canadian Physician Health Institute: Special Projects Fund now available

Published Wed Apr 03/13 2:00pm.
The Canadian Physician Health Institute is a national program focused on promoting physician mental health and wellness. Created by the Canadian Medical Association and the Canadian Medical Foundation, the Institute works with and through partners, to share information and build knowledge around the issues related to physician mental health. To learn more, please visit our temporary website at www.cphi-icsm.ca ― we are continuing work on the main website while the competition for Special Projects funds gets underway.

The fund is designed to support the promotion of physician health and wellness at the national level. We are encouraging submissions from a wide range of proponents including researchers, students, advocacy organizations, practicing physicians, residents, PhD students, educators, physician health programs and others. There is $300,000 available to be awarded this spring through a peer-review process; the exact number of proposals to be funded will be determined through the assessment process.

Download the PDF

Do Parenteral Fluids Benefit Dying Patients?

Published Thu Mar 28/13 2:00pm.

Presented by: Dr. Ray Viola

0800-0900
Friday Apirl 5, 2013
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:

1) List reasons for providing and not providing parenteral fluids to dying patients
2) Describe the evidence that exists regarding the effects of parenteral fluids on dying patients.

Special Presentation by Rosemary Brander, new Director - Office of Interprofessional Education and Practice (OIPEP)

Published Thu Mar 28/13 9:00am.

Dr. Rosemary Brander, the new Director, Office of Interprofessional Education and Practice (OIPEP) for the Faculty of Health Sciences will be delivering a special presentation as part of OIPEP’s Interprofessional Education Forum Series

A Look at the Past, Present and Future of OIPEP with Dr. Rosemary Brander

Wednesday April  17 – 12:00 to 1:00pm, Room 008, Louise D. Acton, 31 George Street

This event is also an opportunity to meet and welcome Dr. Brander to her new role. As leader of OIPEP, she will direct and champion the development of inter-professional education, research and scholarship, and patient-centred practice, for the Faculty of Health Sciences.

Rosemary Brander received her BSc in Physiotherapy from Queen’s University in 1981 and an MSc from the University of Western Ontario in 1991. In 2012, she completed her doctoral studies and received a Ph.D from Queen’s.

For more than 30 years, Dr. Brander has been involved in a wide spectrum of patient-care, practice development and training in the field of physiotherapy, including; elder care, child development, acquired brain injury/acute care, physiotherapy, community services, orthopedics and pediatric care. She has contributed to these areas, as a leader, administrator, advocate, therapist, trainer and scholar.

From 1989-1991, Dr. Brander was a research physiotherapist at St. Joseph's Health Centre, London, where she initiated and led the first physiotherapy research project at SJHC for at‐risk infants discharged from the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.  She has held several leadership roles in our academic health sciences centre. As Manager of Rehabilitation Services, Providence Care from 2001 to 2005, she led more than 100 interdisciplinary staff in seven service units at four sites. Dr. Brander also led 70 plus interdisciplinary staff and program services as the Program Manager, Specialized Geriatric at Providence Care from 2005 to 2010. Since 2010, she has been the Senior Researcher & Program Evaluator, Centre for Studies in Aging & Health providing direction for research and evaluation activities in aging and health services in collaboration with internal and external partners.

An adjunct lecturer in the School of Rehabilitation Therapy, Dr. Brander has also contributed to advancing her profession with more than three-dozen papers, articles and presentations.

Dr. Karen M. Smith appointed Associate Dean, Continuing Professional Development

Published Wed Mar 27/13 9:00am.

Alan Harrison, Provost and Vice-­‐‑Principal (Academic), is pleased to announce that Karen Smith has been appointed Associate Dean, Continuing Professional Development for the Faculty of Health Sciences at Queen’s University for an initial term from January 1, 2013 to June 30, 2016. Dr. Smith had been serving as the Interim Associate Dean, Continuing Professional Development since
September 2011.


Following the receipt of her MD from Queen’s University in 1982 and the completion of her postgraduate training in physical medicine and rehabilitation at McMaster University, Dr. Smith returned to Queen’s in 1994 as an Associate Professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. In 1998, she was appointed Head of the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Queen’s University, Hotel Dieu Hospital, Kingston General Hospital and what was then Providence Continuing Care Centre, a position she held for ten years. Dr. Smith was awarded tenure in 2000.

Dr. Smith received subspecialty certification in spinal cord injury medicine from the American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in 2003 and she was awarded the Ron Wigle Mentorship Award for her achievements in mentorship in 2008. She has been the Clinical Director of the Acquired Brain Injury and Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Services at the Providence Care St. Mary’s of the Lake Site from 1994 to 2012 and she is also affiliated with Kingston General,
Hotel Dieu and Brockville General Hospitals. Dr. Smith’s clinical interests and expertise are in acquired brain injury, spinal cord injury and paediatric rehabilitation. Her research interests are in clinical trials, with current trials in the areas of primary care for persons with disabilities, quality of life, exercise and neurogenic bowel management.


In making this announcement, the Provost expresses his appreciation for the excellent leadership provided by Dr. Smith as Interim Associate Dean, Continuing Professional Development.

Knowledge Translation for Global Health Summer Institute

Published Mon Mar 25/13 8:00am.
The Office of Global Health and the Global Development Studies departments at Queen’s, in partnership with the Canadian Coalition for Global Health Research, are hosting a summer institute, “Knowledge Translation for Global Health” June 3rd to 7th, 2013 at Queen’s University. The course is open to undergraduate and graduate students and professionals. Please visit this link for more information: http://www.queensu.ca/devs/newsevents/archives/2012/globalhealthsummerinstitute/GlobalHealthSummerInstitutebrochure.pdf  A course discount is offered to current Queen's students, please inquire for more information.

App for new residents

Published Fri Mar 22/13 10:00am.
Matched to Queen's? Download our app for newly admitted residents. It's got registration and orientation information, photo galleries, and more. Supports iPhone, iPad, Android, Windows Phone, Windows 8, and HTML 5 compatible devices. Find it at: http://myapp.is/QueensPostgrad

Now on Facebook!

Published Fri Mar 22/13 9:00am.
We invite you to stay connected to Queen's PGME on Facebook.  Find us at facebook.com/queenspostgrad.  Don't forget that we're also on YouTube and Twitter.

James Low wins national research award

Published Thu Mar 21/13 9:00am.

Dr. James Low (Obstetrics and Gynecology) has been announced as the winner of the Ronald G. Calhoun Science Ambassador Award a national research and outreach honour awarded by the Partners in Research (PIR).

Queen’s University professors have won three of the five PIR awards this year. Along with Dr. Low, John Smol (Biology) and Peter Taylor (Mathematics and Statistics) were also recognized as being among the top Canadian researchers recognized for excellence in their fields

“Queen's clearly has much to celebrate with three of its faculty earning these national awards,” says Steven Liss, Vice-Principal (Research). “These awards represent well-deserved acknowledgment for these scholars who go above and beyond their roles as researchers to share their discoveries with the public through various outreach activities.”

Dr. Low has been recognized for his years of research excellence in the field of obstetrics and gynecology and for his founding and leadership of the Museum of Health Care at Kingston.  The Museum is the only in Canada dedicated to the history of health care. The award honours a member of the community providing leadership in support of health care research.

PIR is a registered Canadian charity founded in 1988 to help Canadians understand the significance, accomplishments and promise of biomedical research in advancing health and medicine. Since its genesis, PIR has broadened its scope to encompass science, technology, engineering and mathematics as fields of discovery and study for Canadian students.

The recipients will receive their honours at the Partners in Research National Awards Ceremony on June 2 in London, Ontario.

"To Know or Not to Know": The Psychological and Ethical Implications to Predictive Testing in Huntington Disease

Published Tue Mar 12/13 10:30am.

Presented by: Sherrie McKegney, MSW, RSW

0800-0900
Friday March 15, 2013
Host site: 36 Barrie Street

Objectives:

1. To better understand Huntington Disease and the development of genetic testing
2. To review the psychological and social impact the decision for predictive testing has on the at-risk individual and the family
     *Donna Marie Letourneau will share her personal struggle with living at risk of Huntington Disease
       and her experience with predictive testing
3. To discuss the ethical issues surrounding genomics and the concern for genetic discrimination as a society

Flyer attached here
Click here for Sign-in Sheet
Click here for Evaluation form

"To Know or Not to Know": The Psychological and Ethical Implications to Predictive Testing in Huntington Disease

Published Tue Mar 12/13 10:00am.

Presented by: Sherrie McKegney
, MSW, RSW

0800-0900
Friday March 15, 2013
Host site: 36 Barrie Street

Objectives:

1. To better understand Huntington Disease and the development of genetic testing
2. To review the psychological and social impact the decision for predictive testing has on the at-risk individual and the family
     *Donna Marie Letourneau will share her personal struggle with living at risk of Huntington Disease
       and her experience with predictive testing
3. To discuss the ethical issues surrounding genomics and the concern for genetic discrimination as a society

Flyer attached here
Click here for Sign-in Sheet
Click here for Evaluation form

Congratulations!

Published Wed Mar 06/13 3:00pm.
Congratulations to those medical students who have been matched to one of our residency programs for 2013-2014.  We are looking forward to having you join the postgraduate community at Queen's.  Information about registration and orientation will be sent to you in April.  If you have any questions in the meantime, please don't hesitate to contact us at pgme@queensu.ca.

Chris Simpson elected Ontario CMA President-Elect Nominee

Published Fri Mar 01/13 3:00pm.

Dr. Chris Simpson has been elected by his peers as Ontario's nominee for the position of Canadian Medical Association (CMA) President-Elect for 2013-2014. Pending ratification by the CMA General Council this summer, he will assume the office of CMA President at the 2014 CMA annual meeting, to be held August 17 to 20, 2014 in Ottawa.

"I am so delighted to be entrusted with this national leadership role,” says Dr. Simpson, Chief of Cardiology at Queen’s and Medical Director of the Cardiac Program at Kingston General Hospital/Hotel Dieu. “It's been a great campaign, with many fantastic ideas and creative solutions shared by so many people! I look forward to working with Canada's doctors, other health care professionals, patients, institutional leaders, policy experts, governments and other stakeholders as we continue the transformation of our health care system."

Dr. Chris Simpson has built a career focused on championing improvements to patient care. With a strong interest in public policy, he strives to improve access to care and partnerships between family physicians and specialists. He is the Chair of the Canadian Wait Time Alliance and the Chair of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society's Standing Committee on Health Policy and Advocacy.  His work has lead to a comprehensive set of wait time benchmarks for all cardiovascular consultations, tests and procedures. Dr. Simpson served as the first President of the Canadian Heart Rhythm Society and was the first recipient of the Canadian Medical Association's Award for Young Leaders. He is a Professor of Medicine and Chief of Cardiology at Queen's University as well as the Medical Director of the Cardiac Program at Kingston General Hospital. He serves on the Board of Directors of the Cardiac Care Network of Ontario and on numerous editorial boards and advisory committees.

The CMA President Elect is nominated annually, on a rotational basis, from one of the twelve provincial/territorial medical associations that form the CMA. More information can be found on the CMA website at www.cma.ca

Clinician Scientists, School of Medicine

Published Fri Mar 01/13 10:00am.
The School of Medicine at Queen’s University is currently seeking clinician scientists in a broad range of health research disciplines. Qualified applicants will hold an MD degree (or equivalent), have completed postgraduate qualifications prior to appointment, be eligible for licensure in Ontario, and have outstanding emerging or established research programs. Successful candidates will be provided a minimum of 50% of protected time to pursue research activities. They will also be expected to contribute to the teaching, supervision and mentorship of undergraduate, graduate and postgraduate students. Academic rank will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. For further information on the School of Medicine, please visit http://meds.queensu.ca/.

Review of applications will commence in early 2013 and continue until the positions are filled. Applications should include a full curriculum vitae, a description of research accomplishments and future directions, and evidence of involvement in, and commitment to, medical education. Identification of three referees who can attest to the applicant’s research capabilities and educational experience is requested. Applications are to be directed to: Dr. Richard Reznick, Dean, Faculty of Health Sciences, c/o Mrs. Gail Knutson, Senior Staffing Officer, Macklem House, 18 Barrie Street, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada, K7L 3N6. E-mail: gail.knutson@queensu.ca. The University thanks all who express an interest in these positions.

One of Canada’s leading universities, Queen’s has a long-standing reputation for academic excellence, research and a diverse and vibrant learning environment. With its strong tradition of public service, the University has helped to shape Canadian values and policies, educating notable political and cultural figures.

Queen’s University is located in the heart of the community in historic Kingston, midpoint between Montreal and Toronto, and the nation’s capital.

Queen’s is committed to employment equity and diversity in the workplace and welcomes applications from women, visible minorities, Aboriginal people, persons with disabilities, and persons of any sexual orientation or gender identity. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadian citizens and permanent residents will be given priority.

Deprescribing in Palliative Care

Published Tue Feb 26/13 10:00am.

Presented by: Dr. Chris Frank

0800-0900
Friday March 1, 2013
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. Consider the role of medications in contributing to symptoms in PC patients
2. Develop an approach to medication review and "deprescribing" in palliative care

Flyer attached here.

Professor seeks presidency of Canadian Medical Association

Published Fri Feb 08/13 6:00pm.

Christopher Simpson is passionate about his work and hopes earning the presidency of the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) will give him an opportunity to help lead the transformation of health care in Canada. He has built his campaign around a call for physicians to embrace what he calls civic professionalism – to provide exemplary leadership at an uncertain time for health care.

“The CMA is already moving in a progressive direction but I want to show that we, Canada’s doctors, can be the leaders and the drivers of positive changes to the system,” says Dr. Simpson, Chief of Cardiology at Queen’s and Medical Director of the Cardiac Program at Kingston General Hospital/Hotel Dieu. “Canadians expect us to lead. Governments need us to lead.” Read more...

Should We Standardize Palliative Care Prescribing in Southeastern Ontario?

Published Fri Feb 08/13 10:00am.

Presented by: Dr. Ray Viola

0800-0900
Friday February 15, 2013
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
 

1) Review the international literature regarding essential drugs in palliative care
2) Compare these with the SE Ontario Symptom Response Kit
3) Discuss expanding palliative care medical orders-directives across SE Ontario
4) Discuss the use of the Facilitated Access to Palliative Care Drug Products program

Flyer, Sign-in Sheet, Evaluation Form attached.
Presentation slides attached here.

Should We standardize Palliative Care Prescribing in Southeastern Ontario?

Published Fri Feb 08/13 10:00am.

Presented by: Dr. Ray Viola


0800-0900
Friday February 15, 2013
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
 

1) Review the international literature regarding essential drugs in palliative care
2) Compare these with the SE Ontario Symptom Response Kit
3) Discuss expanding palliative care medical orders-directives across SE Ontario
4) Discuss the use of the Facilitated Access to Palliative Care Drug Products program

Flyer, Sign-in Sheet, Evaluation Form attached.
Presentation slides attached here.

Dr. Russell J. Hollins appointed Head, Department of Otolaryngology

Published Wed Feb 06/13 3:00pm.

Russell Hollins has been appointed as Head of Otolaryngology at Queen's University, Hotel Dieu Hospital and Kingston General Hospital for an initial term from January 1, 2013 to June 30, 2018. These appointments are announced by Alan Harrison, Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) at Queen’s, and Sherri McCullough and Tom Buchanan, Chairs of the Boards of Directors for Hotel Dieu and Kingston General Hospitals.  Dr. Hollins had been serving as the Acting Head of the Department since January 1, 2011.

A graduate of Queen’s University, Dr. Hollins received an Honours Bachelor of Science in Chemistry  in 1991. He was awarded his MD from the University of Ottawa in 1995 and, from 1995 to 2000, he completed his residency and advanced training in the Department of Otolaryngology at the University of Toronto. Dr. Hollins joined the Department of Otolaryngology at Queen's University in 2000 as an Assistant Professor. He has been very active in the medical education curriculum with numerous roles including as facilitator, lecturer, frequent presenter at otolaryngology rounds and teacher of otolaryngology to early-year medical students, clerks and junior residents. Dr. Hollins has served as the Phase IIIB Course Chair since 2002, and as the Phase III Electives Director since 2008. He has also led advanced continuing medical education training in the areas of sinusitis, thyroid and pharyngitis.

Dr. Hollins has also collaborated on several studies within these areas. He has further served his profession as a member of the Joint Ambulatory Clinics Committee and of the Operating Room Committee for Hotel Dieu and Kingston General Hospitals.

In making this announcement the Provost and Board Chairs would also like to thank Dr. Hollins for his leadership of the Department during his role as Acting Head.

2013 Simulation Olympics

Published Tue Feb 05/13 11:00am.
2013 Simulation Olympics

The 2013 competition will be held on May 1st, 2nd, and 3rd (Wed/Thurs/Fri) at the Queen’s Clinical Simulation Centre. Faculty-supervised practice sessions will be held all day on April 25th and April 29th for all teams.

All teams must have the following: 4 members total with a maximum of 2 senior residents, an RN and/or RT member, and a supervising faculty coach.  Faculty coaches are responsible for practice sessions and debriefing during the competition.  Teams without an RN or RT will not qualify to go beyond the preliminary round.

Registration will be open until April 1st and will be capped at twenty teams.

This year’s competition schedule will include a preliminary round (minimum 2 scenarios per team), a semi-final round, and a final round (top 3 teams overall).  The top placing team from the preliminary round will advance directly to the FINALS.  The SEMIFINAL round will be a single elimination format (2nd-5th place teams).

PRELIMINARY ROUND
Wednesday, May 1st (AM & PM) & Thursday, May 2nd (AM).
Thursday, May 2nd (PM) for out-of-town teams only.

SEMI-FINAL ROUND
Friday, May 3rd (AM) for the 2nd-5th place teams overall.

FINAL ROUND
Friday, May 3rd (4-6pm) for the 1st place team overall (direct from PRELIMS) and the 2 SEMIFINAL winners.

As in previous years, there will be lots of expertise to share, prizes to win, colleagues to share stories with, and an awards ceremony reception following the finals.  Come out and enjoy the competition as a competitor, spectator, or senior administrator/educator.

TO REGISTER YOUR TEAM…

Contact Jessica Montagner (Dept EM) by phone 613-548-2368 or email montagnj@kgh.kari.net c/o 2013 Simulation Olympics competition. Please include your team name, team captain contact info (cell/pager/email), team members, faculty coach, and preferred preliminary competition day/time.

Don’t forget to also book time to practice with your team on April 25th or 29th at the Queen’s CSC lab and/or within any of the KGH sim labs.

Do You Know Your Omega-3 Facts?

Published Tue Jan 29/13 9:00am.

Presented by: Lyndsay Glazier, RD; Cathy Renda-Moore, RD; Sarah Patterson, Dietetic Intern

0800-0900
Friday February 1, 2013
36 Barrie Street

Flyer attached here.

Dean Reznick wins national award

Published Wed Jan 23/13 10:00am.


Richard Reznick, Queen’s dean of Health Sciences, has been honoured with the 2013 James H. Graham Award of Merit. The national award recognizes outstanding achievements by physicians and surgeons that reflect the objectives of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.

Dr. Reznick is the first Queen’s faculty member to receive the award.

“Medical education has gone from being a scholarly interest of a few, to a bona fide field of study,” says Dr. Reznick. “It is a privilege to have contributed to that evolution. I am deeply honoured to be recognized by the Royal College and to have my name added to a list of such esteemed physicians and scholars.”

Dr. Reznick is one of the world leaders in surgical education and has helped transform postgraduate medical education and advanced education in specialized medical training.

“We’re very fortunate to have Dr. Reznick as part of the Queen’s faculty,” says Principal Daniel Woolf. “I’m thrilled that he’s being recognized once again for his substantial contributions to medicine, and that our students have the opportunity to benefit from his expertise as they prepare for careers in this challenging field.”

This honorary award of merit was named for Dr. James H. Graham, secretary-general of the Royal College from 1953 to 1979. The national award is a part of the Royal College’s awards and grants program and reflects the aim of the Royal College to improve the health of Canadians by leading in medical education, professional standards, physician competence, as well as in continually enhancing the health care system.

Robert Reid receives Advancement Champion Award

Published Wed Jan 16/13 2:00pm.

Robert Reid’s work to enhance educational opportunities through philanthropic support has earned him this year’s T. Geoffrey Flynn Advancement Champion Award.

“I work with Advancement because it’s a passion of mine. I have enjoyed a lot of great years working at Queen’s, and I have a strong alumni attachment,” says Dr. Reid (Meds’74), a professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology and head of the Division of Reproductive Endocrinology. “I believe appropriately applied advancement can have major benefits at all levels of the education process.” Read full story...

Stephen Scott named neuroscience chair and receives award.

Published Mon Jan 14/13 2:00pm.

Pioneering research into understanding brain function and measuring the effects of brain injury has garnered two major awards for a Queen’s University neuroscientist.

Stephen Scott has been named the university’s first GlaxoSmithKline-Canadian Institutes of Health Research (GSK-CIHR) Chair in Neurosciences, and he has been awarded the Barbara Turnbull Award.

The chair enables him to continue his world-leading research into understanding brain function while at the same time translating his findings into real-world clinical tools. The $50,000 Barbara Turnbull Award supports his contribution to the search for a spinal cord cure.

“I’m honoured to receive this incredible support for my work,” says Dr. Scott. “It will allow me to focus more of my time translating my research on how we control movements of our body to develop new ways to assess brain function and dysfunction.”

Dr. Scott’s research has produced the KINARM, the world’s first robotic system for measuring, with sensitivity and precision, the effects of brain injury on an individual’s ability to perform ordinary movements and tasks. The system is being used to examine a wide range of brain injuries, from stroke and concussion to fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. 

“The work of Dr. Scott and his team at Queen’s is unparalleled in Canada and indeed around the world,” says Dr. Steven Liss, Vice-Principal (Research) at Queen’s. “They are expanding the frontiers of knowledge while at the same time successfully translating their basic research findings into novel and innovative tools that benefit Canadians. We are extremely proud of them and the achievements in their field.” 

The KINARM is now in use at 35 research institutions worldwide, including Johns Hopkins University, Tokyo University and the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute. KINARM robotic systems have been used for clinical research at St. Mary’s of the Lake Hospital and Hotel Dieu Hospital for several years. The recent installation of two KINARMs at Kingston General Hospital, meanwhile, makes this Eastern Ontario health network the only one in the world to offer the breakthrough technology at all of its research hospitals.

The Barbara Turnbull Award is presented annually to the top-ranked spinal cord-related research grant in Canada, as identified by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR). Dr. Scott is the second Queen’s researcher to win the award since it was founded in 2001.

For more information on the Barbara Turnbull Foundation.

Identification and Management of Depression in Older Adults with Dementia

Published Fri Jan 11/13 12:00pm.

Presented by: Dr. Dallas Seitz

0800-0900
Friday January 18, 2013
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:

1.) To review the epidemiology and phenomenology of depression in older adults with dementia;
2.) To understand the evidence for pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatments for depression in dementia;
3.) Discuss local resources for managing depressed older adults with dementia.

Flyer attached here.

Drs. Ted Ashbury and Heather Murray Awarded CAME Certificate of Merit

Published Tue Jan 08/13 3:00pm.

Congratulations to Dr. Ted Ashbury (Anesthesia) and Dr. Heather Murray (Emergency), both of whom are very involved in Medical Education!  They have been awarded the Canadian Association for Medical Education (CAME) Certificate of Merit, which promotes, recognizes and rewards faculty committed to medical education in Canadian medical schools.

In Undergraduate Medical Education, Ted has developed and is the Course Director for Professional Foundations 2 and 3, pre-clerkship courses which teach about the intrinsic or non-medical expert roles of a physician.  He has also served as the Competency Lead for the Professionalism Role since the inception of the Competency Lead Role.  Ted has also served as a founding member of the UGME Curriculum Committee.

In Undergraduate Medical Education, Heather developed and is the Course Director of Critical Appraisal, Research and Learning (CARL) and the Critical Enquiry Course in pre-clerkship UGME.  She is also the Competency Lead for the Scholar role from years 1-4 and serves on the UGME Curriculum Committee.

These deserving colleagues will be recognized at the upcoming CAME Annual General Meeting, which is held in conjunction with the Canadian Conference on Medical Education (CCME) in Québec, QC on Sunday, April 21, 2013 at 17:30 at the Hilton Hotel Québec. Please join us in congratulating these individuals for their commitment to medical education in Canada.

Content from InfoMed Blog by Sheila Pinchin http://meds.queensu.ca/blog/undergraduate/?p=280

Dr. Susan Cole to be first Researcher in Residence for PARTEQ

Published Mon Jan 07/13 12:00pm.

Dr. Susan ColeQueen’s University researchers now have an opportunity to learn about commercializing their research from a colleague.

PARTEQ Innovations, the technology transfer office of Queen’s, is pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. Susan Cole as PARTEQ’s first Researcher in Residence.  As the co-inventor of PARTEQ’s most-licensed technology, Dr. Cole will mentor and assist researchers who may wish to consider protecting and commercializing their discoveries. She will also facilitate PARTEQ’s outreach into life sciences.PARTEQ

“One of the best ways for a researcher to understand what’s involved in commercializing their work is to hear about it from someone within their own ranks,” says John Molloy, President and CEO of PARTEQ. “Susan brings a unique perspective into how discovery research can have broad and long-lasting impacts.”

Dr. Cole, who is Canada Research Chair in Cancer Biology and Bracken Chair in Genetics and Molecular Medicine and a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, was previously Deputy Provost of Queen’s and is a former PARTEQ board member. She is the co-inventor, with Dr. Roger Deeley, Vice-Dean Research, Queen’s Health Sciences/Vice-President, Health Sciences Research, Kingston General Hospital, of the gene coding for a multidrug resistance protein (MRP). Their 1992 discovery was an important advancement in scientists’ understanding of drug resistance in tumours, as well as drug disposition in normal tissues.  Their breakthrough discovery has been issued 12 patents and it has been licensed to more than 30 companies worldwide, where it continues to contribute significantly to drug development and cancer research.

Research a priority for new head of medicine

Published Wed Jan 02/13 3:00pm.

Stephen Archer enjoyed his time as a medical student at Queen’s in the late 1970s and early ’80s, but that’s not why he accepted the job as head of the Department of Medicine.

“It was mostly the superb medical school, the existing strengths of the department and the quality of our fully accredited training program that brought me back to Queen’s – it wasn’t just fond memories,” says Dr. Archer. “I came back for the opportunity to run a great department, pursue my personal research, and help build a medical program I care about.”

Dr. Archer started his five-year term in November after spending four years as chief of cardiology at the University of Chicago.

He believes Queen’s produces great research and has a solid reputation. A fervent researcher himself, Dr. Archer has published more than 200 papers and won numerous awards, including the Research Achievement Award from the Canadian Cardiovascular Society and the Distinguished Scientist Award form the American College of Cardiology. His research focuses on defining the role of the mitochondria in the causation of diseases such as pulmonary hypertension and cancer.

Read full story...

Communication with Children Around the Dying Process or Death of a Loved One

Published Wed Jan 02/13 2:00pm.


Presented by: Dr. Stephen Singh

0800-0900
Friday January 4, 2013
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. Understand that death and dying are not beyond a young child's comprehension
2. Learn ways to feel more confident and competent when talking with children about dying or death
3. Learn ways to assist families in supporting their children

Flyer attached here.
Presentation slides attached here.

The Skill of Brokenheartedness: Euthanasia, Palliative Care and Power

Published Thu Dec 20/12 9:00am.

Hosted by: Janeta Kobes, CASC certified Specialist, Spiritual Care, KGH

0800-0900
Friday December 21, 2012
36 Barrie Street (host site)

Objectives:
1. To consider our dominant NA culture of death phobia
2. To consider grief as a valuable and necessary learned skill
3. To consider "quality of life" and "quality of death"

Please registered your site following the link: https://schedule.otn.ca/tsm/portal/nonclinical/details.do?request.requestId=23652229

Flyer attached here.

Queen's researcher first to successfully use biodegradable esophageal stent

Published Tue Dec 18/12 9:00am.

Queen’s University researcher Lawrence Hookey (School of Medicine) has successfully performed the first endoscopic procedure in North America using a biodegradable esophageal stent. The procedure was performed at Kingston General Hospital. The stents – essentially tubes inserted in the throat - are used to improve the quality of life for patients who have difficulty swallowing. Read full story...

Lymphedema in Advanced Cancer

Published Wed Dec 05/12 3:00pm.

Presented by: Vicki Campbell, Registered Fitter Board of Orthotics Certified

0800-0900
Friday December 7, 2012
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1) You will learn about current supportive therapies for managing lymphedema due to cancer
2) Strategies for managing limb discomfort

Flyer attached here.

Simulation Student Contest Winner

Published Fri Nov 30/12 1:00pm.
SIM-one is proud to announce David Clinkard, a student from Queen's University School of Medicine, as the winner of its inaugural Simulation Student Contest.

The SIM-one Simulation Student Contest was created to highlight the work of Ontario healthcare students who have used simulation to further develop their professional roles. The theme of the contest was: “How healthcare simulation transformed my learning”. Participants were required to submit an essay or video for evaluation.

In his essay submission, David Clinkard admits to knowing little about simulation prior to entering medical school. His perception and appreciation of simulation would dramatically change following his participation at his school's Clinical Simulation Centre (CSC). Not only did simulation develop David's critical technical skills, it also gave him a much better understanding of the team dynamics and leadership ability needed in today's clinical setting.

David's work will be highlighted at SIM-one's 2012 Ontario Simulation Exposition on December 5-7 in Toronto.

Read David Clinkard's essay HERE.

Working to save lives in Tanzania

Published Tue Nov 27/12 11:00am.

Dr. Karen Yeates, from the School of Medicine is using cell phone technology to create a cost-effective method of screening for cervical cancer in low-resource settings.

“We believe this method has the potential to save the lives of thousands of women residing in the poorest areas of the world,” says Dr. Yeates, co-director of the Queen’s School of Medicine Office of Global Health. “Using cell phones can help lower the barriers to large-scale screening and Pap smears in the developing world.”

Dr. Yeates and Olola Oneko at the Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre for Reproductive Health in Tanzania are implementing a project that will help evaluate the method. While examining a woman’s cervix, a trained non-physician healthcare worker will use a cell phone to take a photo and send it to a trained doctor. The doctor or his/her trained cerviography team members will examine the photo for any abnormalities and text back a diagnosis and recommended treatment.

Dr. Yeates recently received a $100,000 Rising Stars in Global Health grant from Grand Challenges Canada to implement her project. Grand Challenges Canada is funded by the Government of Canada and supports innovative ideas that can have a major impact on global health conditions. Dr. Yeates was one of 17 Canadians selected for the grant

Watch the Kilimanjaro Cervical Screening Project video.

Fighting cancer with cell phones: Innovation to save lives in Africa

Published Mon Nov 26/12 11:00am.
CNN)-- Only innovation can reduce illness and poverty in Africa, according to a program that is funding creative approaches to healthcare in developing countries.

More than 50,000 women die each year of cervical cancer in Africa, according to World Health Organization estimates, as more than 80% of the cases are detected in late stages. read full story...

Too Tired to Care: Compassion Fatigue

Published Thu Nov 22/12 2:00pm.

Presenter: Melissa Touw, APN


0800-0900
Friday Nov 23, 2012
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. To define compassion fatigue
2. To discuss signs and symptoms and impact on daily life
3. To identify self-care strategies for compassion fatigue

Students and Residents, add your voice to Canada’s largest physician workforce survey!

Published Mon Nov 19/12 7:00am.

The National Physician Survey (NPS) launched on November 12 and all residents and medical students in Canada are invited to participate. An invitation will be distributed by e-mail and the survey will take only 10-15 minutes to complete.  All responses will remain completely confidential. The input you provide will help shape the future of your chosen profession.

Complete the survey and you could win a $1,000 prize! Follow this link to learn more, or visit the NPS website to complete the survey.

Three School of Medicine researchers awarded Diamond Jubilee Medals

Published Thu Nov 08/12 2:00pm.

Four members of Queen’s School of Medicine are among the most recent recipients of Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal. The Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal is a way for Canada to honour Her Majesty for her service to this country. At the same time, honours significant contributions and achievements by Canadians.

“The fact that so many of our researchers are being recognized with Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medals is great testament to the quality of research happening here at Queen’s,” says Principal Daniel Woolf. “It’s a great honour to be able to count myself among them.” 

The  School of Medicine recipients include:

  • Susan P.C. Cole (Pathology, Deputy Provost) has been recognized for her outstanding contributions to cancer research focused on the study of the biochemical and molecular mechanisms that limit the effectiveness of cancer chemotherapy.
  • Elizabeth Eisenhauer (Oncology) is recognized for her commitment to the advancement of cancer therapy, supportive care and prevention across Canada and internationally.
  • T. Geoffrey Flynn (Biomedical and Molecular Sciences) is recognized for his commitment to the advancement of science, through his support of both research and teaching excellence. 

Other recipients include: Daniel Woolf (Principal and Vice-Chancellor), John Smol (Biology), Wendy Craig (Psychology), Steven Liss, Kerry Rowe (Civil Engineering)  and Will Kymlicka (Philosophy). These recipients join members of the Queen's community who have also received the medal and have been recognized through various other organizations.

"Open Wide - Take a Look" Oral Care

Published Wed Nov 07/12 10:00am.

Presented by: Dr. Ingrid Harle

0800-0900
Friday November 9, 2012
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. Understand the risk factors for the development of oral complications
2. Discuss basic and intensified oral care plans
3. Identify common oral problems
4. Discuss preventive and treatment measures for common oral problems

Presentation slides attached here.


AFMC Awards – Nominations due November 9th

Published Mon Oct 22/12 10:00am.

This is a reminder of the Call for Nominations for the AFMC Awards, due Friday, November 9th:

  • AFMC - President's Award for Exemplary National Leadership in Academic Medicine
  • AFMC Award for Outstanding Contribution to Faculty Development in Canada
  • AFMC - John Ruedy Award for Innovation in Medical Education
  • AFMC Young Educators Award
  • AFMC - May Cohen Equity, Diversity, and Gender Award
  • AFMC - Infoway, e-Health Award

Detailed information can be found at:

 http://www.afmc.ca/awards-e.php

CLIME 2013 – February 4-7, 2013 – Ottawa ON

Published Mon Oct 22/12 8:45am.

Registration Is Now Open for the 2013 edition of the Canadian Leadership Institute for Medical Education(CLIME).

This Institute, which was designed by Canadian experts in medical education will include sessions on:

  • Personal and Interpersonal Effectiveness
  • Leadership Styles and Skills
  • Change and Time Management
  • Conflict Resolution and Negotiation
  • Effective Teamwork & Collaborative Practice
  • Scholarship in Medical Education

More information about CLIME 2013 and how to register for this Institute can be found on the CAME website at http://www.came-acem.ca/mededconferences_clime_en.php.  To register now, click here.

Register early, as space is limited to 42 participants. You can also take advantage of the early registration rate, which is in effect until November 1, 2012

SEAMO announces Medical Education Development Program recipients and call for next round of applications

Published Mon Oct 15/12 9:00am.

Five physicians are to receive funding through SEAMO’s Medical Education Development Program (MEDP) to pursue studies in educational scholarship.
 
Dr. Richard Reznick, CEO of SEAMO and Dean, Queen’s Faculty of Health Sciences is pleased to announce the successful candidates for the first round of MEDP funding:

·       Dr. Eric Bruder, Department of Emergency Medicine
·       Dr. Jennifer MacKenzie,Department of Pediatrics
·       Dr. Devin Sydor, Department of Anesthesiology & Perioperative Medicine
·       David Taylor, Department of Medicine
·       Dr. Andrea Winthrop, Department of Surgery
 
The MEDP provides support to SEAMO-funded physicians interested in developing new skills and/or enhancing existing abilities in medical education, medical educationscholarship and research.
 
This program supports SEAMO’s objective to build an academy of SEAMO physician educational leaders and scholars with a critical mass sufficient to enable the continuous implementation of best principles and leading practices in medical education.  Through its endorsement of the Report and Recommendations of the 2010 Task Group on Allocations System Review (TGSAR), the SEAMO Governing Committee established the Medical Education Fund to finance and operationalize this strategy.
 
SEAMO is now accepting applications for a second round of MEDP funding.  The deadline for submissions is Friday, November 30, 2012.  For more information, refer to the backgrounder and application form CLICK HERE
If you have questions, please contact the office of Dr. Leslie Flynn, Interim Vice-Dean Education, Queen’s Faculty of Health Sciences

Phone:  613-533-6000 ext. 78273
Email:   mandyc@queensu.ca

Compassionate Care - A Patient Experience with Liz Shibley

Published Thu Oct 11/12 10:00am.

Presented by: Liz Shibley & Janeta Kobes

0800-0900
Friday October 12th, 2012
36 Barrie Street

Objectives;
1. Explore the meaning of "compassion"
2. Explore human characteristics that embody compassion
3. Explore compassion and self-care
4. Explore the value of compassionate care in meeting the needs of patients and families.

Michael A. Adams appointed Head, Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences

Published Sat Oct 06/12 8:00am.

Alan Harrison, Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) at Queen’s University, is pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. Michael Adams as the inaugural Head of the Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences for an initial term from October 1, 2012 to June 30, 2017. Dr. Adams has been in the role of Interim Head of the Department since November 1, 2010.

After completing his undergraduate and graduate education at the University of Western Ontario in 1985, Dr. Adams spent three years as a postdoctoral fellow at the Baker Medical Research Institute in Melbourne Australia. He joined Queen’s University in 1988 as an Assistant Professor, initially with a joint appointment between the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and the Department of Anesthesiology. Dr. Adams was granted tenure and promoted to Associate Professor in in 1994 and to Professor in 1998.  He was appointed as the Acting Head of the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology during the 2009/2010 academic year and as Interim Head of the newly integrated Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences in November 2010.

Dr. Adams is widely known and respected as a productive researcher and leading expert on the causes and consequences of cardiovascular and kidney disease, sexual dysfunction, and the development of new therapeutic strategies in prevention and treatment. His reputation as an educator is equally recognized. He has been instrumental in establishing and delivering multi-disciplinary cardiovascular science courses in numerous undergraduate, graduate and professional programs and he is a leading innovator in the use of online technologies for course delivery.

Dr. Adams’ work as a scholar and teacher has been recognized with numerous awards, including a PMAC/HRF-Medical Research Council of Canada Career Award in Medicine, the Mihran and Mary Basmajian Award for Excellence in Medical Research, and two Faculty of Health Sciences Education Awards.

In making this announcement, Dr. Harrison would like to thank Dr. Adams for his leadership during the transition of the basic sciences departments in the School of Medicine to the Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences.

John Austin Society - Medical History Lecture Series

Published Wed Oct 03/12 9:00am.
Residents are invited to attend the John Austin Society's Medical History Lecture Series.  The first lecture is entitled "Key Opinion Leaders:  Choreographing The Pharmaceutical Two-Step".  The pharmaceutical industry uses some physicians, called key opinion leaders or KOLs, as intermediaries to influence prescribing physicians. The KOL concept is owed in part to the work of sociologist Paul Lazarsfeld and his students, studying the influence of mass media on voting behaviour. In this presentation, I introduce that history in order to show how the pharmaceutical industry has successfully established a structure of influence it can use.

The first lecture will be presented by Dr. Sergio Sismondo on October 11th from 5:30-6:30pm at the University Club, 168 Stuart Street. Details of the 2012/2013 lecture series are available here.

 

Clinician Scientist, Department of Medicine

Published Mon Oct 01/12 12:00pm.
The Department of Medicine at Queen’s University is currently recruiting clinician scientists in a broad range of health disciplines. Qualified applicants will hold an MD degree (or equivalent); have completed postgraduate qualifications in a discipline relevant to the Department of Medicine; be eligible for licensure in Ontario; have a MSc or PhD in clinical epidemiology (or similar discipline); and must be eligible to receive funding from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. Successful candidates will be provided a minimum of 50% of protected time to pursue their individual research activities. There is an opportunity for one clinician scientist to assume a leadership and administrative position in the Clinical Evaluation Research Unit (CERU) at the Kingston General Hospital. CERU is a hospital-based methodological support unit for all types of clinical and health service research projects (see www.ceru.ca for more details.) Academic rank will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. For further information on the School of Medicine, please visit http://meds.queensu.ca/.

One of Canada’s leading universities, Queen’s has a long-standing reputation for academic excellence, research and a diverse and vibrant learning environment. With its strong tradition of public service, the University has helped to shape Canadian values and policies, educating notable political and cultural figures.

Queen’s University is located in the heart of the community in historic Kingston, midpoint between Montreal and Toronto, and the nation’s capital.

 

Review of applications will commence on March 1, 2012, and continue until the position is filled. Applications should include a full curriculum vitae and a description of research accomplishments and future directions.  Identification of three referees who can attest to the applicant’s research capabilities is requested. Applications are to be directed to: Dr. Daren Heyland. E-mail: dkh2@queensu.ca. The University thanks all who express an interest in these positions.

www.hr.queensu.ca

Queen’s is committed to employment equity and diversity in the workplace and welcomes applications from women, visible minorities, Aboriginal people, persons with disabilities, and persons of any sexual orientation or gender identity. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadian citizens and permanent residents will be given priority

Anne Croy recognized for outstanding contributions

Published Mon Sep 24/12 9:00am.

Queen’s University professor Anne Croy (Biomedical and Molecular Sciences) has been formally inducted into the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences (CAHS).

Dr. Croy is a world-leader in reproductive sciences. She has had a major impact on the understanding of maternal and infant health through her studies of changes in the immune and cardiovascular systems during pregnancy. In particular, her ground-breaking description of uterine Natural Killer (uNK) cells and their functions.

“I look forward with great anticipation to broad opportunities provided by this honour,” says Dr. Croy. “It enables me to work on behalf of the Canadian population, with leaders in all aspects of health care, to assess urgent issues and to provide unbiased information for the development of public policy.”

CAHS fellows are individuals who have a history of outstanding performance in the academic health sciences in Canada and who are recognized by their peers nationally and internationally for their contributions to the field.

Election to fellowship in the academy is considered one of the highest honours for individuals in the Canadian health sciences community.

The CAHS works in partnership with the Royal Society of Canada and the Canadian Academy of Engineering to form the three member academies of the Council of Canadian Academies.

William Pickett appointed Head, Department of Community Health and Epidemiology

Published Fri Sep 21/12 11:00am.

Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Alan Harrison is pleased to announce that William Pickett has been appointed as Head of the Department of Community Health and Epidemiology at Queen's University for an initial term from January 1, 2013 to June 30, 2018.

Dr. Pickett completed his post-secondary education at three Ontario universities receiving a BSc in biology from the University of Guelph in 1984, an MSc in epidemiology from Queen’s in 1990, and a PhD in preventive medicine from the University of Toronto in 1995.  Following the receipt of his PhD, he joined the Department of Community Health and Epidemiology at Queen’s, with a special joint appointment with the Kingston Frontenac Lennox and Addington Health. In 1999, Dr. Pickett joined Queen’s full-time, being promoted to to Associate Professor in 2000 and to Professor in 2008. he also holds a cross‐appointment in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Queen’s and an adjunct appointment in the Department of Medicine at the University of Saskatchewan.

Maintaining an active program of research in the areas of child health, injury control science, and applied emergency medicine research, Dr. Pickett has undertaken significant studies funded by a number of agencies including the Canadian Institute for Health Research, the Public Health Agency of Canada, the National Institute of Occupational Health and Safety, and the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care Career Scientist Program. He has published 190 articles in peer‐reviewed journals as well as numerous abstracts, editorials, case reports and book chapters, in non‐peer reviewed journals.

Since 1996, Dr. Pickett has delivered fourteen courses to graduate level students primarily involving epidemiological methods. He has received several departmental awards for graduate teaching and supervision and he continues to supervise a number of undergraduate and graduate students. He served as the Director of the MSc Program in epidemiology at Queen’s from 2007-11, and has been an active contributor to the department’s teaching programs in undergraduate life sciences and medicine.

In making this announcement, Dr. Harrison would like to extend his sincere appreciation to Dr. William Mackillop for the outstanding leadership that he has provided to the Department of Community Health and Epidemiology since January 2002.

Dr. Roumen Milev reappointed as Head, Department of Psychiatry

Published Thu Sep 20/12 10:00am.
Alan Harrison, Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) at Queen’s, and Sherri McCullough, Tom Buchanan and Glen Wood, Chairs of the Boards of Directors for Hotel Dieu Hospital, Kingston General Hospital, and Providence Care are pleased to announce that Roumen Milev has been reappointed as Head of Psychiatry at Queen’s University, Hotel Dieu Hospital, Kingston General Hospital and Providence Care for a second term from July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2017. Dr. Milev was first appointed head of the department on October 1, 2007. Dr. Milev is also the Program Medical Director of Mental Health for Kingston General Hospital and Hotel Dieu Hospital.

Dr. Milev obtained his medical degree, doctorate in forensic psychiatry, and specialty in psychiatry in Sofia, Bulgaria. He subsequently re-trained in psychiatry and was appointed as a Lecturer at Leeds University in England. He relocated to Canada in 1995 to take up a position as Clinical Lecturer in Psychiatry with the University of Saskatchewan in Regina. He was promoted to Clinical Assistant Professor in 2000. Dr. Milev came to Queen’s in 2001 as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry. He was promoted to Associate Professor in 2005 and to Full Professor in 2009. Dr. Milev also holds a cross-appointment in the Department of Psychology. He has served as Chair of the Division of Adult Treatment and Rehabilitation Psychiatry, Deputy Head of Department for the Providence Care Site, and Program Clinical Director for the Adult Treatment and Rehabilitation Services Program.

Dr. Milev was instrumental in the development of a nationally and internationally recognized Mood Disorders Research and Treatment Service at Queen’s, and he has a consistent record of scholarly publication. He serves on or chairs numerous committees and he is frequently invited to speak at conferences in Canada and internationally.

Dr. Milev’s scholarship and contributions to the education of medical students and residents has been recognized internationally. Dr. Milev has been elected by his peers as a Fellow in the American Psychiatric Association, the Royal College of Psychiatrists (UK), and as an inaugural Fellow of the Canadian Psychiatric Association.

Dr. Stephen L. Archer appointed as Head, Department of Medicine

Published Wed Sep 19/12 11:00am.

Alan Harrison, Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) at Queen’s, and Sherri McCullough, Tom Buchanan and Glen Wood, Chairs of the Boards of Directors for Hotel Dieu Hospital, Kingston General Hospital, and Providence Care are pleased to announce that Stephen Archer has been appointed as Head of Medicine at Queen's University, Hotel Dieu Hospital, Kingston General Hospital, and Providence Care for an initial term from November 1, 2012 to June 30, 2018.

Dr. Archer is married to Dr. Kathie Doliszny and they have 3 children, the youngest of whom attends Queens. He is an avid hockey player, enjoys playing the classical guitar, reading and photography. Dr. Archer was awarded his MD at Queen’s University in 1981 as a Gold Medal in Medicine recipient the. After interning at the Royal Columbian Hospital in New Westminster, British Columbia, he completed his training in medicine and cardiology at the University of Minnesota. He joined the Department of Medicine at the University Minnesota in 1988, attaining the rank of Associate Professor in 1992 and Professor in 1997. Dr. Archer also worked as a staff cardiologist and Director of the Echocardiography Laboratory at the Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Medical Center from 1988 to 1997. In 1998, he was appointed as Professor of Medicine and Physiology, Heart and Stroke Chair in Cardiovascular Research, and Director of the Cardiology Division at the University of Alberta. In 2007, Dr. Archer assumed the role of Harold Hines Jr. Professor of Medicine and Director of the Heart and Vascular Research Group at the University of Chicago. From 2007 to 2010, he also served as Chief of the Cardiology Section at the University of Chicago. In 2008, he was selected as a Pritzker Scholar at the University of Chicago.

An internationally renowned cardiologist and translational physician-scientist, accomplished author and dedicated educator, Dr. Archer’s clinical interests include pulmonary hypertension, persistent ductus arteriosus, strategies for improving cardiovascular care, and training the next generation of physician-scientists. He has published 200 papers and his translational cardiovascular research has been recognized with numerous awards, including most recently in 2011 the Distinguished Scientist Award in the Translation Domain from the American College of Cardiology.  His discovery of an epigenetic basis for pulmonary hypertension was selected by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute as one of their Top Discoveries of 2010.  He also is the recipient of the 2004 Research Achievement Award from the Canadian Cardiovascular Society and the 2011 Award of Merit from the Cleveland Clinic Respiratory Institute.

He is the past chair of the American Heart Association’s (AHA) Cardiopulmonary and Critical Care Council and past-president of the Chicago Board of the AHA. In the latter capacity he led the AHA, Chicago Affiliates participation in the creation of a regional system of care for patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction (Mission Lifeline), culminating in system implementation in May 2012. In recognition of this achievement he has been named the Chicago AHA Coeur d’Or recipient for 2013.

In making this announcement, the Provost and Board Chairs would like to express their appreciation to Dr. John McCans for his excellent leadership and many contributions during the ten years that he served as Head of the Department of Medicine.

Mala Joneja honoured for work promoting patient-centred care

Published Thu Sep 13/12 1:00am.

Mala Joneja has earned an inaugural Associated Medical Services (AMS) Phoenix fellowship for her program aimed at exposing resident physicians to the concept of compassionate, patient-centred care.

“I applied for the fellowship because the opportunity was very much in line with what I value in medical education, namely the balance between technical expertise and human compassion,” says Dr. Joneja, Associate Program Director of the Core Internal Medicine training program in the Department of Medicine.

Dr. Joneja, who also serves as the Program Director for the Rheumatology residency program, is interested in improving the educational activities for resident physicians. In particular, she will examine the impact the ‘hidden curriculum’ has on resident physicians as they engage with the medical education system and the teaching hospital hierarchy.

Her program will ask resident physicians to examine their experiences and reflect on a critical incident in their day-to-day work where patient-centred care was lacking. The resident physicians will share their experiences with their peers, and Dr. Joneja intends to collect the submissions for future resident physician training.

Dr. Joneja has observed patients and their families advocating for more compassionate physicians in recent years, and notes that many hospitals have put patient-centred care at the top of their agenda. She’s encouraged to see the trend spread to medical education through the support of groups such as the AMS Phoenix Project. As one of seven fellows, she looks forward to sharing her ideas with likeminded medical educators and drawing on the support network created by the AMS Phoenix Project.

More information about the AMS Phoenix Fellowship

Dr. Gordon Jones reappointed as Head, Department of Emergency Medicine

Published Sun Sep 09/12 10:00am.

Alan Harrison, Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) at Queen’s, and Sherri McCullough, Tom Buchanan and Glen Wood, Chairs of the Boards of Directors for Hotel Dieu Hospital, Kingston General Hospital, and Providence Care are pleased to announce that Gordon Jones has been reappointed as Head of the Department of Emergency Medicine at Queen’s University, Kingston General Hospital, Hotel Dieu Hospital and Providence Care for a second term from July 1, 2012 to June, 30 2017. Dr. Jones was first appointed Head of the Department on January 1, 2007.

After graduating with his MD from Queen’s University in 1982, Dr. Jones remained at Queen’s where he completed a one-year internship in family medicine followed by three years of residency training in emergency medicine. In 1986, he joined the staff of the Sudbury General Hospital as a full-time emergency physician and in 1987 he was appointed as the Medical Director of the Land Ambulance Paramedic Program in Sudbury.Dr. Jones returned to Queen’s in 1988 as an Assistant Professor in what was then the Division of Emergency Medicine within the Department of Surgery. He was promoted to Associate Professor in 2007.). Throughout his career at Queen’s and the Hospitals, Dr. Jones has served as Medical Director of the Regional Base Hospital for Southeastern Ontario where he gained provincial and national recognition for his expertise in the paramedic/pre-hospital field, as Chair of the Section on Pre-hospital Care for the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians, as a member of the Executive for the Provincial Base Hospital Advisory Group, as Chair of the Provincial Base Hospital Medical Advisory Committee,  and as chair of the Medical Advisory Committee working group to improve critical care transfers to KGH.

A highly respected clinical educator, Dr. Jones is a three-time recipient of the Clinical Skills Teaching Awards from Queen’s University. As Undergraduate Program Director for the Department of Emergency Medicine since 2005, he has developed new objectives for the clerkship rotation in emergency medicine and he has participated in the curriculum renewal process for the School of Medicine. Dr. Jones has authored or co-authored several articles primarily related to pre-hospital care that have been published in peer-reviewed journals or presented at national meetings.

Dr. Ralph M. Meyer reappointed as holder of the Edith and Carla Eisenhauer Chair in Clinical Cancer Research and Director, NCIC Clinical Trials Group

Published Fri Sep 07/12 10:00am.

Queen’s Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic), Dr. Alan Harrison is very pleased to announce the reappointment of Dr. Ralph Meyer as holder of the Edith and Carla Eisenhauer Chair in Clinical Cancer Research and as Director of the NCIC Clinical Trials Group (NCIC CTG) for a second term from July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2017.

After attending the University of Guelph, Dr. Meyer undertook his undergraduate medical training at McMaster University, receiving his MD in 1978. Following his internship at the Ottawa General Hospital, he completed his residency training in both internal medicine and hematology at McMaster. He joined the faculty in the Department of Medicine at McMaster University in 1984 where he rose through the ranks, attaining the rank of Professor in 1997. He served as Head of the Hematology Program at the Juravinski Cancer Centre from 1999 to 2006, as Director of the Division of Hematology in the Department of Medicine from 2000 to 2006, and as Director of the Division of Hematology for the Hamilton Regional Laboratory Medicine Program from 2000 to 2006.

Dr. Meyer was recruited to Queen’s from McMaster in April 2006 as Director Designate of the NCIC CTG. He assumed the dual role of holder of the Eisenhauer Chair and Director of the NCIC CTG in April 2007. A tenured Professor in the Department of Oncology, Dr. Meyer also holds cross-appointments in the Departments of Medicine and Community Health and Epidemiology. As a hematologist, he also holds appointments in hematology and medical oncology at Hotel Dieu Hospital, Kingston General Hospital and the Cancer Centre of South Eastern Ontario.

As Director of the NCIC CTG, Dr. Meyer is responsible for ensuring the quality of its scientific agenda and operational processes. He also takes an active part in the development, execution and analysis of many of the Group's trials. His own research interests are in the hematologic malignancies and the generation of clinical trials evidence for use in health care policies. He has authored more than 80 peer-reviewed papers and, in 2008, Dr. Meyer’s scholarly contributions were recognized by his being honoured with the Lymphoma Foundation Canada Commitment Award.

Dr. Glenn D. Brown reappointed as Head, Department of Family Medicine

Published Fri Sep 07/12 10:00am.

Alan Harrison, Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) at Queen’s, and Sherri McCullough, Tom Buchanan and Glen Wood, Chairs of the Boards of Directors for Hotel Dieu Hospital, Kingston General Hospital, and Providence Care are pleased to announce that Glenn Brown has been reappointed as Head of Family Medicine at Queen’s University, Hotel Dieu Hospital, Kingston General Hospital and Providence Care for a second term from  July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2017. Dr. Brown was first appointed Head of the Department on  July 1, 2007.

After graduating from McMaster University, Dr. Brown completed his residency training in family medicine and enhanced skills in anesthesia and emergency medicine at Queen’s. He subsequently spent a number of years delivering family medicine and anesthesia services in northern Ontario and as a family physician in Napanee. Dr. Brown served as Chief of Staff at Lennox and Addington County General Hospital in Napanee and as Director of Emergency Medicine.

Dr. Brown was cross-appointed to the Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine in 2008 and he was promoted to the rank of Associate Professor in 2009.  Prior to his appointment as Head of Department, Dr. Brown served as a preceptor for residents and medical students in the Queen’s Family Medicine program. He was also the departmental Director of Postgraduate Education from 1997 to 2003 with responsibility for the Enhanced Skills Program, the first program of its kind in Canada to receive full accreditation. Dr. Brown has also served as departmental Director of Medical Education.

Dr. Brown is a founding member of the Healthcare Network of Eastern Ontario, which was a pre-cursor to the now established Local Health Integration Networks (LHIN). He was the founding Chair of the Primary Health Care Council for the South East LHIN, he is the Canadian representative for the Association of Chairs of Family Medicine (Canada) to the American Association of Departments of Family Medicine. He is the Chair of the Family Medicine Council of the Ontario Faculties of Medicine. A highly productive and esteemed scholar, Dr. Brown has frequently been invited to speak at conferences and seminars in Canada and the United States and is involved internationally in health policy issues related to primary care and public health.

Jacalyn Duffin elected to Royal Society of Canada

Published Thu Sep 06/12 10:00am.
Dr. Jacalyn Duffin (School of Medicine) has been elected by society members for her outstanding contributions to medicine.

Dr. Duffin is the Hannah Chair for the History of Medicine and a practicing physician and historian. Duffin is one of the first scholars to fully-integrate history into medical curricula. For her book Medical Miracles, Dr. Duffin went through the Vatican archives to study more than 1,400 miracles from 1588 to 1999.

“This recognition of my work is humbling and I am ever so grateful for the support of colleagues who believe in the value of humanities research in medical education and practice,” Dr. Duffin says.

Dr. Duffin will be recognized at a Royal Society banquet in November.

The Royal Society of Canada was established under an Act of Parliament in 1882 as Canada’s national academy. It helps promote Canadian research, scholarly accomplishment and advises governments, non-governmental organizations and Canadians on matters of public interest.

CLIME Registration Now Open

Published Thu Sep 06/12 9:00am.
CLIME 2013 / ICLÉM 2013 – February 4-7, 2013 – Ottawa ON
 
We are pleased to inform you that CAME, in collaboration with the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, the Medical Council of Canada, the Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada, and the College of Family Physicians of Canada, will be sponsoring the 2013 edition of the Canadian Leadership Institute for Medical Education(CLIME).
 
This Institute, which was designed by Canadian experts in medical education, will take place in Ottawa from February 4 to 7, 2013.  CLIME 2013 will be presented in English (with small working groups in French and in English) and will include sessions on:
 
  • Personal and Interpersonal Effectiveness
  • Leadership Styles and Skills
  • Change and Time Management
  • Conflict Resolution and Negotiation
  • Effective Teamwork & Collaborative Practice
  • Scholarship in Medical Education
More information about CLIME 2013 and how to register for this Institute can be found on the CAME website.  To register now, click here.  We encourage you to register early, as space is limited to 42 participants. You can also take advantage of the early registration rate which is in effect until November 1, 2012.   CAME members receive a discounted rate on registration fees - $200 in savings!  Join CAME to enjoy member benefits.
 

CPD Fall Programs

Published Tue Aug 21/12 2:00pm.
The Office of Continuing Professional Development is pleased to offer our lineup of fall programs including Infectious Diseases on Wednesday, October 3rd, "Doc I Can't Sleep" on Saturday, October 20th, the 35th Annual Memorial Program from Thursday, October 25th to Friday, October 26th, and Educating Family Physicians in Palliative Care from Thursday, November 15th to Sunday, November 18th. Please click here for more details.

Update from CAIR

Published Mon Aug 20/12 9:00am.
The Canadian Association of Internes and Residents (CAIR) is pleased to reveal the new layout for its quarterly newsletter,
CAIR Update, which can be downloaded here.  Please note that there is a resident wellbeing leadership opportunity offered for the upcoming International Conference in Physician Health. CAIR, in partnership with the conference organizers and the Canadian Medical Foundation, is seeking residents to serve as workshop moderators for this important event. The deadline for entries is August 31, 2012.

Dr. Kimberly Dow appointed Acting Head of the Department of Paediatrics

Published Wed Aug 01/12 8:00am.

Alan Harrison, Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) at Queen’s, and Sherri McCullough and Tom Buchanan, Chairs of the Boards of Directors for Hotel Dieu and Kingston General Hospitals are pleased to announce that Dr. Kimberly Dow has been appointed Acting Head of the Department of Paediatrics at Queen’s University, Hotel Dieu Hospital and Kingston General Hospital for the period September 1, 2012 to June 30, 2013.

Dr. Dow received her MD from Queen’s University and subsequently completed  residency training in paediatrics and a neonatology fellowship at Harvard Medical School. She joined the Department of Paediatrics in 1982 at the rank of Lecturer and was promoted to Assistant Professor in 1983, to Associate Professor in 1989, and to Professor in 1998.  During her career at Queen’s and the Academic Health Sciences Centre, Dr. Dow has held several academic and clinical leadership appointments. She served as Head of the Department of Paediatrics at Queen’s, Hotel Dieu Hospital and Kingston General Hospital from 1998 to 2008 and was the Program Medical Director (Paediatrics) at Kingston General and Hotel Dieu Hospitals from 2006 to 2008. Dr. Dow is currently cross-appointed to the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

Dr. Dow is a recognized expert in neonatology and her research has focused on the cellular mechanisms of neuronal growth during development, mechanisms of hypoxic neuronal injury and, more recently, on evidence-based quality improvement initiatives in neonatal intensive care. She has published extensively and her research has been funded by numerous agencies including the Canadian Institutes for Health Research, the Hospital for Sick Children Foundation, the Heart and Stroke Foundation and the Physicians’ Services Incorporated Foundation.

External to Queen’s, Dr. Dow is currently Chair of the Canadian Paediatric Surveillance Program Steering Committee and a member of the Steering Committee for the Canadian Neonatal Network. She is also past Chair of the Program Committee of the Association of Medical School Paediatric Departments and was a member of the Paediatric Task Force for the Ontario Health Services Restructuring Committee.

In making this announcement, the Provost and Board Chairs would like to express their gratitude to Dr. Sarah Jones for the leadership she has provided as Head of the Department of Paediatrics since March 1, 2010.

Michael D. Kawaja appointed Associate Dean, Life Sciences and Biochemistry, Faculty of Health Sciences

Published Wed Jul 11/12 2:00pm.

Queen’s University Provost, Dr. Alan Harrison, is pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. Michael Kawaja as Associate Dean, Life Sciences and Biochemistry in the Faculty of Health Sciences. This appointment is for an initial five-year period from 1 July 2012 to 30 June 2017.

Dr. Kawaja completed his undergraduate studies in biology at Acadia University and his doctoral degree in anatomy at the University of Western Ontario in 1989.  He subsequently undertook two MRC-funded postdoctoral positions, first at the University of California in San Diego and second at the Samuel Lunenfeld Institute at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto.  In 1993 Dr. Kawaja commenced his MRC-funded scholarship position as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology at Queen's University. He was promoted to Associate Professor in 1999, and to Professor in 2004.

Dr. Kawaja has held numerous operating grants from CIHR (MRC), Heart and Stroke Foundation, Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation, and Ontario Mental Health Foundation.  He has also held a Premier’s Research Excellence Award.  He has served as a panel member of CIHR Scholarships, CIHR Neuroscience, Alzheimer Society of Canada, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada, Ontario Mental Health Foundation, and Ontario Ministry of Research and Innovation Early Researcher Awards.  His research focuses on gaining a greater understanding of the reparative mechanisms in the mammalian central and peripheral nervous systems, as a consequence of injury and disease.

Dr. Kawaja is a highly regarded educator, having twice (2008, 2010) won the “Most Engaging Lecturer” from Queen’s Life Science students.

In making this announcement, the Provost expresses sincere gratitude to Dr. Kenneth Rose, who held the position of Associate Dean Life Sciences and Biochemistry from 2007 to 2012, for his outstanding service to the Faculty and the University.

Globalink joins top students with Queen’s researchers

Published Fri Jul 06/12 10:00am.

Queen’s researchers are connecting with international undergraduate students in a unique program designed to attract talent from around the world and introduce Canada as a leading research and innovation destination.

This year, Queen’s welcomes six international students through the Globalink program, including Kaushal Baid from India, who arrived in May to work for three months with Wendy Wobeser (Medicine) on her research into drug-resistant HIV strains. Read more...

Life Before Death - A Multi-award Winning Documentary Series

Published Thu Jun 28/12 10:00am.
Hosted by: Dr. Deb Dudgeon

0800-0900
Friday June 29, 2012
36 Barrie Street

Objectives:
1. To understand issues worldwide related to management fo pain

Dr. Anthony J. Sanfilippo reappointed Associate Dean, Undergraduate Medical Education

Published Wed Jun 27/12 9:00am.

Alan Harrison, Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) at Queen’s University is pleased to announce that Dr. Sanfilippo has been reappointed Associate Dean, Undergraduate Medical Education within the School of Medicine in the Faculty of Health Sciences from July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2017.

After graduating from Queen’s with a BSc (Hons) degree in Life Sciences in 1976 and an MD in 1981, Dr. Sanfilippo undertook his residency training in internal medicine at Kingston General Hospital and his clinical fellowship training in cardiology at Queen’s. He subsequently completed two years of postgraduate research fellowship training at Harvard University and Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Dr. Sanfilippo returned to Queen’s in 1989 as an Assistant Professor in the Division of Cardiology within the Department of Medicine and clinical cardiologist at Hotel Dieu and Kingston General Hospitals. He was promoted to Associate Professor in 1994 and to Professor in 2005.

A three-time recipient of the Faculty of Medicine Excellence in Clinical Teaching Award, Dr. Sanfilippo has also received an Aesculapian Society Teaching Award for undergraduate teaching and a Department of Medicine Award for Excellence in Postgraduate Teaching. He has developed numerous educational sessions at this Academic Health Sciences Centre and throughout Canada.

Dr. Sanfilippo has headed the Echocardiography Laboratories at both teaching hospitals, and under his direction the laboratory expanded its activities considerably. His research interests have involved echocardiography, valvular heart disease and, in manifestations of cardiac disease in women. He serves on several national and provincial committees and is Past President of the Canadian Society of Echocardiography; he was the recipient of the Society’s Achievement Award in 2007. He has held numerous administrative positions in the Department, the Hospitals, and the Faculty. Dr. Sanfilippo has also served as Deputy Head of the Department of Medicine, and as Program Medical Director for the Medicine Program at Kingston General.

Dr. Sanfilippo led the creation of the new “Foundations” curriculum for the School of Medicine. This involved a complete redesign and conversion of the Queen’s undergraduate medical education curriculum into a leading edge, competency-based program.

Dr. D. Robert Siemens appointed Head, Department of Urology

Published Wed Jun 27/12 9:00am.

Dr. Siemens has been appointed as Head of Urology at Queen's University, Hotel Dieu Hospital and Kingston General Hospital for an initial term from July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2017. These appointments are announced by: Alan Harrison, Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) at Queen’s, and Sherri McCullough and Chris Cunningham, Chairs of the Boards of Directors for Hotel Dieu and Kingston General Hospitals.

Dr. Siemens obtained his medical degree from Queen’s University in 1992 and, following five years of postgraduate training at Queen’s, he completed a fellowship in oncology at the University of Iowa. He returned to Queen’s as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Urology in 2000 and he was promoted to the rank of Associate Professor and granted tenure in 2006. In 2011, he was promoted to the rank of Professor. Dr. Siemens is cross-appointed to the Departments of Oncology and Biomedical and Molecular Sciences.

A respected clinician, researcher and educator, Dr. Siemens is a role model for students and trainees with his caring, inquisitive and compassionate approach to patients and their families. He has made a major contribution to the Faculty’s educational programs, particularly at the postgraduate level. As Residency Program Director from July 2001 to June 2010, Dr. Siemens played a key role in revamping the postgraduate curriculum in the Department. He has supervised countless students at the undergraduate and postgraduate levels and he has served on the Royal College Examination Committee for Urology. He is well regarded as a teacher and supervisor by his students. In 2005 Dr. Siemens was recognized by the Canadian Medical Association with the CMA Young Leaders Award and in 2010 the Canadian Association of Medical Education Certificate of Merit Award.

Dr. Siemens’ research interests have focused on the effects of micro-environmental changes on cancer behavior and particularly the ability of cancer cells to evade immune detection. As well, he is interested in epidemiology and clinical outcomes in genito-urinary oncology, specifically in quality of surgical care  of prostate and bladder cancers. He has published over 100 peer-reviewed papers and book chapters and he has been invited to speak at numerous national and international events. Dr. Siemens has received research grants from the Canadian Urological Association Scholarship Fund, Prostate Cancer Canada, American Urological Association, and CIHR with special interest in novel treatments for prostate and bladder cancer.

Dr. Siemens has served, and continues to serve, on numerous Departmental, Faculty, Hospital and specialty committees and he is committed to advancement of the scholarly and academic aspects of his profession.

In making this announcement, the Provost and Board Chairs would like to express their deep gratitude to Dr. James Wilson for the outstanding leadership that he has provided while serving as Head of the Department from 1997 to 2012.

New Strategic Plan released

Published Tue Jun 26/12 11:00am.
The new Strategic Direction for the Faculty of Health Sciences and School of Medicine Strategic Plan 2012-2016 have been released.  These documents outline othe new Faculty vision, a new mission for the School of Medicine, plus the strategic priorities that will be undertaken as we move forward. Residents are encouraged to visit the School of Medicine website featuring  a video summary and online copies of these documents.

Broken Heart Syndrome: A Case of Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Secondary to Cancer-Related Pain Crisis

Published Tue Jun 19/12 10:00am.
Presented by: Dr. Stephen Singh

0800-0900
Friday June 1, 2012
36 Barrie Street

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
(1) Explain the Mayo-Clinic criteria for diagnosis of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC)
(2) List at least three precipitating factors for the development of TC
(3) Explain to patients why investigation of potential complications of pain crisis could help improve quality of life

Flyer attached here.

Dr. Elizabeth E. Eisenhauer appointed Head, Department of Oncology

Published Mon Jun 11/12 10:00am.

Elizabeth Eisenhauer has been appointed as Head of Oncology at Queen's University, Hotel Dieu Hospital and Kingston General Hospital for an initial term from July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2017. These appointments are announced by: Alan Harrison, Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) at Queen’s, and Sherri McCullough and Chris Cunningham, Chairs of the Boards of Directors for Hotel Dieu and Kingston General Hospitals.

Dr. Eisenhauer obtained her MD from Queen's University in 1976 and subsequently completed training in both internal medicine and hematology, obtaining fellowships from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons (Canada) in 1980 and 1981.  She holds an appointment at the rank of Professor in the Department of Oncology and she has cross-appointments in the Departments of Medicine and Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

In 1982, Dr. Eisenhauer was appointed as the Director of the Investigational New Drug Program (IND) of the National Cancer Institute of Canada, Clinical Trials Group (NCIC CTG) where her major responsibilities lie in identifying and bringing into clinical trial novel cancer agents. Since then, the IND Program has conducted 190 studies that have included almost 5,200 patients and tested more than 100 new anti-cancer drugs. New agents tested in these trials have included drugs subsequently tested in randomized controlled trials and with benefits demonstrated with that testing, some have been adopted as standard treatments. Other Program accomplishments have included forwarding the methodology of phase I-II clinical trials, serving as a platform for training new investigators, and facilitating the career development of Canadian investigators with interests in evaluating new anti-cancer drugs. In 2002, she was appointed to the board of directors of the NCIC and in 2006, she became the Institute’s President.

Dr. Eisenhauer’s accomplishments have been recognized nationally and internationally. This recognition has included delivering the 1998 Michel Clavel Memorial Lecture Plenary Session at the NCI-EORTC Investigational New Drug Symposium, being awarded the National Cancer Institute of Canada (now Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute) O. Harold Warwick Prize in 2002, and the Society of Gynecologic Oncology of Canada Presidential Medal in 2010, and most recently delivering the NDDO Honorary Award Lecture at the Targeted Anti-Cancer Therapy Congress. In 2008, Dr. Eisenhauer was appointed Chair of the Research Action Group of the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer and Co-Chair of the Canadian Cancer Research Alliance.

In making this announcement, the Provost and Board Chairs would like to express their gratitude to Dr. James Biagi for the outstanding leadership that he provided while serving as Acting Head of the Department from July 1, 2010 to June 30, 2012.

Faculty Promotions and Tenure 2012: Congratulations!

Published Thu Jun 07/12 1:00pm.

Dean Richard Reznick is very pleased to extend proud congratulations on behalf of Queen's University and our faculty, students and staff in the Faculty of Health Sciences to these faculty members whose outstanding teaching, scholarly and clinical work have been recognized through promotion to new ranks and/or the granting of tenure:

Promotion to Associate Professor:

Michael J. Beyak – Medicine, Gastroenterology
James J. Biagi – Oncology
Anne K. Ellis – Medicine, Allergy
Rachel M. Holden -– Medicine,Nephrology
Sarosh Khalid-Khan – Psychiatry
Jessica K. Jones – Psychiatry
Sarah A. Jones – Pediatrics
Alan  E.G. Lomax – Biomedical & Molecular Sciences and Medicine
K.C. Lawrence Leung – Family Medicine
Michel Melanson – Medicine, Neurology
Elaine O. Petrof  – Medicine, Infectious Diseases
Margo Rivera – Psychiatry
Richard van Wylick – Pediatrics
Christine A. White – Medicine, Nephrology
Wendy L. Wobeser –Medicine, Infectious Diseases

Tenure:

Gregory A.L. Davies – Professor, Obstetrics & Gynecology
Mary Anne Jamieson – Associate Professor,Obstetrics & Gynaecology
Shawna L Johnston – Associate Professor, Obstetrics & Gynaecology
Damian P. Redfearn –  Associate Professor, Medicine, Cardiology

Tenure and Promotion to Associate Professor

Alice Aiken – School of Rehabilitation Therapy
Xiaolong Yang -­Pathology & Molecular Medicine

Promotion to Professor:

Danielle Blouin ­ Emergency Medicine
Christine P. Collier  - Pathology and Molecular Medicine
Gerald A. Evans – Medicine,nfectious Diseases
David P. LeBrun  - Pathology & Molecular Medicine
Linda McLean – School of Rehabilitation Therapy
Martin Paré – Biomedical & Molecular Sciences
Steven P. Smith – Biomedical & Molecular Sciences
Joan E. Tranmer – School of Nursing

Research team awarded prestigious National Institute of Health grant

Published Mon May 28/12 9:00am.
Queen’s University professor Daren Heyland and his research team at the Kingston General Hospital Clinical Evaluation Research Unit (CERU) received a grant from the National Institute of Health (NIH) to advance research into meeting the nutrition needs of high risk, critically ill patients.

The TOP UP Trial is examining whether “topping up” with intravenous nutrition - providing more energy and protein - can improve the survival rates of the critically ill.

“Our previous work has shown that providing more energy and protein to patients with a Body Mass Index of less than 25 or more than 35 may be associated with better survival in critically ill patients,” says Dr. Heyland, who is also a staff physician at KGH. “The National Institute of Health is the United States premiere medical research agency providing funding for health research. It’s rare for a Canadian researcher to receive funding from this organization.” Read full story...

Showcase shines the spotlight on patient-oriented research at KGH

Published Fri May 25/12 3:00pm.

Kingston General Hospital celebrates the research achievements that have made it a national and global leader in patient-oriented research on May 29, 2012 at an open public event.

The second annual KGH Research Showcase will shine the spotlight on research programs, discoveries and innovations at KGH as well as our local hospital and university partners. Featuring live demonstrations, research exhibits and panel discussions, the Research Showcase offers the public a rare glimpse into the groundbreaking discoveries that turn into life-saving innovations.

“It’s a tremendous opportunity for people in the community to learn how patients are benefiting from the research and innovation taking place at KGH and with our hospital partners,” says Dr. Roger Deeley, KGH Vice President, Health Sciences Research. “It’s also an opportunity for researchers to network with their peers, spark collaborations and grow their research programs.”

Two expert-led panel discussions open to the public will take place: At 12:30 – 2:00 p.m. on recognizing the signs and symptoms of anxiety disorders and depression, and at 7:00 – 8:30 p.m. on new approaches to diagnosing concussions in children who play hockey.

Date: May 29, 2012

Location: Kingston General Hospital, Connell 3 (Old Cafeteria)

Time: Open house from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. and 5:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

Panel discussions:

  • 12:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. – Hear me, understand me and support me: living with anxiety disorder and depression
  • 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. – Hockey and the brain: An overview of pediatric concussions in minor hockey

This event is free of charge and open to all KGH staff, members of the regional research community, students and the general public.

To learn more and register for one of our panel discussions, visit www.kghconnect.ca

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MEDIA: Interviews with expert panellists can be arranged in advance of the May 29 event on request.

Kingston General Hospital is a community of people dedicated to transforming the patient and family experience through innovative and collaborative approaches to care, knowledge and leadership. As southeastern Ontario’s leading centre for complex-acute and specialty care,  and home to the Cancer Centre of Southeastern Ontario,  KGH serves almost 500,000 people through its Kingston facility and 24 regional affiliate and satellite sites. Fully affiliated with Queen’s University, KGH is a research and teaching hospital which is home to 2,400 health-care students and 160 health researchers. KGH was ranked in 2011 as one of Canada’s Top 40 Research Hospitals by Research Infosource.To learn more, visit www.kgh.on.ca or join the conversation at www.kghconnect.ca

Media contact:

Theresa MacBeth
KGH Communications & Public Affairs
613-549-6666 x 4851
613-540-4789 cell
macbetht@kgh.kari.net

Ottawa's Experience with Methadone Rotation: Retrospective and Prospective Studies

Published Thu May 24/12 3:00pm.
Presented by: Dr. Peter Lawlor & Dr. Raphael Chan

0800-0900
May 11, 2012
36 Barrie Street

Dr. Chandrakant Tayade received the Early Researcher Award from the Ministry of Research and Innovation

Published Tue May 22/12 11:00am.
Preventing endometriosis
Project title: Blocking the growth of blood vessels as a new treatment for endometriosis
Lead researcher: Dr. Chandrakant Tayade

Endometriosis is a painful condition that often leads to infertility. The only solution is surgery – but it is successful only 50 percent of the time. Queen’s University researcher Dr. Chandrakant Tayade is exploring a promising new preventative treatment which, if successful, could change the lives of the 8.5 million women and teens in North America who suffer from endometriosis.

Fall 2012 MCCQE Part II Application Now Available Online

Published Mon May 07/12 4:00pm.
The examination will be held on Saturday, October 27 and Sunday, October 28, 2012 (some centres will open both days and other centers on either Saturday or Sunday).
 
IMPORTANT:  In order to be eligible for the fall 2012 MCCQE Part II, candidates must satisfactorily complete a minimum of 12 months (52 weeks) of postgraduate clinical medical training no later than June 30, 2012.
 
  • Family Medicine eligible residents:  Please consult the New Certification Examination in Family Medicine and the MCCQE Part II.
  • The base examination fee for the fall 2012 MCCQE Part II is C$2,150; the main application deadline is Wednesday, May 30, 2012.
  • All eligible candidates will be required to first apply online (by 11:59 p.m., Eastern Time (ET)) on Wednesday, May 30 if they do not wish to incur a late fee), with a Visa or MasterCard payment, then submit the required paper forms and documentation to the MCC office within ten (10) business days of their online application.
  • Late fees will apply for applications submitted online after 11:59 p.m. ET on Wednesday, May 30, 2012.
  • The final application deadline is Monday, July 23, 2012 (before 11:59 p.m. ET).
  • See the MCC Website to complete an online application and access the application steps.

Canada's Rising Stars in Global Health Grand Challenges Competition

Published Thu May 03/12 1:00pm.
Dr. Karen Yeates has submitted an entry to Canada's Rising Stars in Global Health Grand Challenges Competition (Grand Challenges Canada is based at the Sandra Rotman instiute for Global Health, U of T). The submission features mobile technology used in cervical cancer screening in the Kilimanjaro region of Tanzania. Please watch Dr. Yeates' video, create an account and vote!

Job Posting: Curatorial Assistant - YCW-HO

Published Sun Apr 22/12 11:00pm.
Job Posting: Curatorial Assistant - YCW-HO
Young Canada Works in Heritage Organizations
Summer Student

Please note: this position is subject to funding by Young Canada Works. Applicants must be registered as a Young Canada Works candidate to be eligible for the position. Please go to www.youngcanadaworks.gc.ca for a detailed list of requirements.

Job Description
The Curatorial Assistant will conduct research and compile reports detailing the history, use, and significance of several objects in our collection, including an iron lung and artefacts relating to the First World War.  They will produce an information package on the medical history of the First World War to be distributed to members of the public.  The Curatorial Assistant will also work with the Curator to develop an exhibition relating to respiration and ventilation, including selecting topics and themes, identifying objects for display, and creating text panels.
The Curatorial Assistant will interact with the public, as they will greet visitors and lead tours one day a week, and will take part in the delivery of special events and educational programming as required.

They will also be given the opportunity to participate in a summer's end professional development learning opportunity held at area heritage sites.

Qualifications:
Candidates for this position will be senior undergraduate or graduate students in Museum Studies, History, History of Medicine or a related discipline.  Excellent English oral and written communications skills are required.  The successful candidate will be able to demonstrate research skills and experience working with primary and secondary documents (i.e. research papers, reports, etc).  Knowledge of PC computer platforms (Word, Excel, Outlook) is required.  The candidate should be self-directed and motivated, as well as able to work in a team environment.

Previous museum experience, archival research, and a working knowledge of a second language, such as French, will be considered assets.

Applicants must meet all Young Canada Works in Heritage Organizations (YCW-HO) eligibility criteria.
In order to comply with the terms of the YCW-HO grant program, applicants must:
·          be legally entitled to work in Canada;
·          be a Canadian citizen, permanent resident or have refugee status in Canada; NB: Non-Canadian students holding temporary work visas or awaiting permanent status are not eligible.
·          be between 16 and 30 years of age at the start of employment;
·          be registered in the YCW candidate inventory (www.youngcanadaworks.gc.ca);
·          be willing to commit to the full duration of the work assignment;
·          not have another full-time job (over 30 hours a week) while employed with YCW;
·          have been a full-time student (as defined by their educational institutions) in the semester preceding their job with YCW; and
·          intend to return to full-time studies in the semester following their job with YCW.

Position Details: The expected wage is $11.00 per hour, with a 35-hour work week (includes weekends), from May 22, 2012 to August 31, 2012. Dates are dependant on grant funding and may be revised. Occasional evening work may be required.
To apply for this position, please submit your cover letter and résumé by 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, 3  May 2012 to the attention of Pamela Peacock, Curator, by email to peacockp@kgh.kari.net, or by mail / hand-delivery to: Museum of Health Care at Kingston, Ann Baillie Building National Historic Site, 32 George Street, Kingston, Ontario K7L 2V7

We thank everyone for your interest in this position; please note that only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

Dr. Martin W. ten Hove appointed Acting Head, Department of Ophthalmology

Published Tue Apr 17/12 3:00am.

Dr. Alan Harrison, Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) at Queen’s University, Mrs. Sherri McCullough, Chair of the Board of Directors for Hotel Dieu Hospital, and Ms. Leslee Thompson, President and Chief Executive Officer of Kingston General Hospital, are pleased to announce that Dr. Martin ten Hove has been appointed Acting Head of Ophthalmology at Queen’s University, Hotel Dieu Hospital and Kingston General Hospital for the period April 1, 2012 to June 30, 2013.

Following the receipt of his MD from Queen’s University in 1989 and the completion of his postgraduate training in neuro-ophthalmology as a McLaughlin Fellow at the University of Miami in 1995, Dr. ten Hove returned to Queen’s as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Ophthalmology. He served as the Department’s Postgraduate Program Director from the time of his appointment until 2000 and he was promoted to Associate Professor and awarded tenure in 2001. Dr. ten Hove previously served as Acting Head from 2003 to 2004 and he has been the Deputy Head of the Department of Ophthalmology since 2005.

Dr. ten Hove is actively involved in research into the neural mechanisms underlying visual attention. He has often been invited to present his work at national and international meetings. He has served on the Examination Committee of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, on the Royal College Specialty Committee for Ophthalmology, and on the editorial boards for the Canadian Journal of Ophthalmology and the Journal of Neuro-ophthalmology. He has worked with ORBIS, the CNIB and the University of West Indies to bring tertiary level ophthalmology to remote locations to help fulfill their educational and clinical needs.

In making this announcement, the Provost and Board Chairs wish to express their appreciation for the excellent leadership provided by Dr. Sherif El-Defrawy during his eight year tenure as Head of the Department of Ophthalmology.

Executive Vice-Dean Faculty of Health Sciences

Published Mon Apr 02/12 11:00am.
Dean Richard Reznick is pleased to announce that Dr. Iain Young has been appointed Executive Vice-Dean, Faculty of Health Sciences effective March 1, 2012. This position replaces the role that Dr. Young has held as Vice-Dean Academic and is in recognition of added responsibilities. In his capacity as Executive Vice-Dean, Dr. Young will have overall responsibility for providing oversight of faculty planning, faculty support, and operations related to the strategic plan of the Faculty. Dr. Young will continue to lead human resource management as it pertains to faculty members within the Faculty and to serve as chief academic affairs officer for the School of Medicine. In addition, Dr. Young will provide oversight of academic reviews, searches for leadership positions and engage in leadership development; he will support the design and development of benchmarks of academic performance consistent with the University Academic Plan and the Faculty of Health Sciences Strategic Plan; contribute to the development and implementation of strategic planning and executive policy; and liaise with the Chiefs of Staff and Medical Advisory Committees of the affiliated teaching hospitals regarding academic affairs.

Dr. Young received his MD from McGill University in 1982. After completing his internship in internal medicine at the Royal Victoria Hospital and McGill and residency training in anatomic pathology at Queen’s in 1987, he was appointed as an Assistant Professor in what was then the Department of Pathology at Queen’s. Dr. Young was promoted to Associate Professor and granted tenure in 1993 and promoted to Professor in 2003.

From 2002 to 2009, Dr. Young was Head of the Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine. Prior to that time, he served in a number of leadership positions including Director of Postgraduate Education in Pathology, Director of the Anatomic Pathology Residency Program, and Chief of the Divisions of Anatomic Pathology at Hotel Dieu and Kingston General Hospital. Since 2009, he has held the position of Vice-Dean Academic in the Faculty of Health Sciences. From January to April 2011, Dr. Young also served as Acting Dean for the Faculty, Acting Director of the School of Medicine, and Acting Chief Executive Officer of the Southeastern Ontario Academic Medical Organization. Regarded as an expert in diagnostic nephropathology and recognized as an excellent teacher, Dr. Young has received teaching awards from undergraduate medical students and residents, most recently the Aesculapian Society Lectureship Award and the RSA Prentice Award for Excellence in Resident Teaching.

Assistant Dean, Regional Education Faculty of Health Sciences

Published Wed Mar 28/12 2:00pm.
Dean Richard Reznick is pleased to announce the creation of the new decanal portfolio of Assistant Dean, Regional Education. In recognition of the increasing importance of distributed/integrated medical education to the strategic direction of the Faculty, this Assistant Deanship replaces the previous position of Director, Regional Education Development. Dean Reznick is equally pleased to announce that Dr. Eugene Dagnone has been appointed as the inaugural Assistant Dean, Regional Education  effective March 1, 2012.

In 1968 Dr. Dagnone received his MD from the Queen’s School of Medicine, following which he completed his internship at the University of Saskatchewan. He returned to Queen’s for residency training in internal medicine in 1970 and, in 1972, he joined the Department of Surgery as a Lecturer. He was promoted to Assistant Professor in 1975, Associate Professor in 1976 and Professor in 1994.

From 1975 to 1986, Dr. Dagnone served as the initial Chair of the Division of Emergency Medicine within the Department of Surgery. He was Medical Director of the Emergency Department at Hotel Dieu Hospital from 1972 to 1988 and Medical Director of Kingston General Hospital from 1999 to 2002. A highly respected educator in the School of Medicine, he has served as Director of the Phase III Clinical Clerkship since 1997 and as Director, Regional Education Development since 2002.

Dr. Dagnone is held in very high esteem within the field of emergency medicine. He has authored and participated in dozens of scholarly articles, position papers and, of special note, 28 reports for the Government of Ontario. He has also participated in more than two dozen hospital and emergency department reviews and he has sat on numerous committees for the Ontario Ministry of Health, the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, the Ontario Medical Association and the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians. Since 1993, Dr. Dagnone has been an external consultant to the Steering Committee on Review of Hospital and Community Emergency Services in Ontario.

Associate Dean, Finance and Administration Faculty of Health Sciences

Published Wed Mar 28/12 2:00pm.
Dean Richard Reznick is pleased to announce that Mr. David R. Edgar has been appointed as Associate Dean, Finance and Administration for the Faculty of Health Sciences effective March 1, 2012. The elevation of this post to Associate Dean is in recognition of Mr. Edgar’s longstanding service and contributions and the on-going importance of his portfolio to the academic strategy of the Faculty

Mr. Edgar received his undergraduate degree from Queen’s University, followed by an MBA with a specialism in public administration and an MSc in strategic focus from Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh. He is currently a doctoral candidate at Heriot-Watt in the Edinburgh School of Business. In addition, Mr. Edgar is a Certified Management Accountant and a Fellow in the Institute of Chartered Secretaries and Administrators.

Mr. Edgar joined the Faculty as Business Officer in 1988, and he is currently the Assistant Dean, Operations and Finance. In addition to his decanal responsibilities he has been the chief financial officer for the Southeastern Ontario Academic Medical Organization (SEAMO) since its inception in 1994. He has also served as Secretary to Faculty Board and the School of Medicine since 2007.

ICRE and ICOSET 2012 registrations now open

Published Tue Mar 27/12 4:00pm.
Registration is now open for three unique educational forums designed to advancing residency training. All three will be hosted by the Royal College in Ottawa during the third week in October.

International Conference on Surgical Education and Training (ICOSET)
October 17-18, 2012. Click here to register.

International Conference on Residency Education (ICRE)
October 18-20, 2012. Click here to register.

International Resident Leadership Summit (IRLS)
October 20-21, 2012. Click here  to register.  
 
These events are part of the Royal College’s continued commitment to advancing the highest standards in residency education.

Andrew Craig earns top award from Canadian Cancer Society

Published Tue Mar 27/12 11:00am.
Andrew Craig has been announced as the recipient of the Canadian Cancer Society’s 2011 Young Investigator Award.

“My research program has really been developed by creative, highly-skilled and motivated students, faculty, and post-doctoral fellows. I look at the award as something to share with all of them,” says Dr. Craig, an associate professor in the Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences and member of the Queen’s Cancer Research Institute. Read full story...

Family Medicine Earns Top Residency Award

Published Fri Mar 23/12 9:00am.

The Department of Family Medicine’s Residency Program has won this year’s Professional Association of Internes and Residents of Ontario (PAIRO) Residency Program Excellence Award.

The award recognizes programs that provide positive and rewarding experiences for their residents, while producing expertly trained physicians. The Family Medicine program is the third Queen’s residency program to win this prestigious award since it was established in 2006. Queen’s General Surgery won the first award in 2006, followed by Anesthesiology in 2009.

“This latest award from PAIRO is a testament to how incredibly committed our faculty are to their residents at Queen’s”, says Richard Reznick, Dean, Faculty of Health Sciences. “Three programs from one school in six years is fantastic. We are delighted that PAIRO has recognized the outstanding work of the Department of Family Medicine.”

The award recognizes the dedication of the faculty and staff at the department’s three existing sites: Kingston & 1000 Islands, Belleville-Quinte and Peterborough-Kawartha. In July, the department will launch its fourth site, Queen’s Bowmanville-Oshawa-Lakeridge (QBOL).

“This award was initiated and supported by our residents from all sites and is a testament to all of our preceptors, allied health care professionals and staff who support our residents’ education,” says Karen Schultz, Program Director, Queen’s Family Medicine. “Their hard work and the positive atmosphere they create are clearly providing a supportive, strong, innovative learning environment that our residents really appreciate. It doesn’t get better than that.”

Dr. Schultz will receive the award on behalf of the department in Toronto in May. PAIRO will also make a $1,000 donation to the department’s residency program education fund.

The latest recognition comes on the heels of Queen’s postgraduate medical education’s most successful accreditation review in recent memory.

Queen's Med student recognized for breast cancer fundraising

Published Thu Mar 22/12 1:00pm.

Poonam Batra (Med '12) was one of two Queen's students singled out by The Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation for their exceptional contributions during last fall’s inaugural national Post-Secondary Team Challenge during the CIBC Run for the Cure.

Poonam Batra (Med '12) receives a CIBC Education Award for raising one of the largest donations by an individual for the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation in the CIBC Run for the Cure.

"I have been incredibly lucky and blessed with the support I have received from friends and family. They were the reason I was able to raise funds well beyond anything I could have hoped for," says Poonam Batra (Med '12), who received a CIBC Education Award after raising one of the largest amounts by a post-secondary student in Canada.

Ms Batra's main motivation was to raise awareness about breast cancer. Two years ago she was diagnosed with the disease despite having no risk factors. Sharing her story with family members, friends and colleagues in her department resulted in the creation of "Team Purple – Queen’s Medicine and Friends," which has had tremendous success supporting Run for the Cure.

Queen's Rugby Team player Colin Greenwood (Sc'13) was presented with a Team Captain Leadership Award for helping his team members raise the most funds by a post-secondary team in Ontario, more than $30,000

Medical students empowering young people to reach their potential with MedExplore

Published Fri Mar 16/12 9:00am.

A new program led by Queen’s medical students will provide training in skill development, networking and career exposure to several local communities, including the Four Directions Aboriginal Student Centre and the Tyendinaga Technical School in the Bay of Quinte.

“The program is aimed at enhancing skills to promote ownership within the realm of health in the Aboriginal community,” says Renee Pang (Meds ’13), who is leading the initiative through MedExplore. “It’s very exciting to work with them as they build their futures.”

MedExplore is a program run out of the Queen’s Office of Global Health that aims at developing leadership and mentorship programs for populations underrepresented in medicine. The program strives to foster interest in health care and potentially recruit future students into medical professions. However, it is designed to offer students useful skills regardless of the career they choose. Read more...

Allingham named Canada Research Chair in Structural Biology

Published Fri Mar 16/12 9:00am.
John Allingham is one of Queen's two new Canada Research Chairs (CRC).

Dr. Allingham (Biomedical and Molecular Sciences), Canada Research Chair in Structural Biology, is working on developing new drug compounds that will specifically inhibit the ability of disease-causing cells to invade our bodies.

"I feel incredibly grateful and privileged to hold a place among some of the greatest scientists and innovators in Canada," says Dr. Allingham. "I am also very proud to work in the company of the stellar basic and clinical science community at Queen's, and to have the amazing opportunity to explore novel ways to inhibit the invasive properties of cancer cells and microbial pathogens."

Dr. Mohammed Zulkernine (School of Computing), has been named the Canada Research Chair in Software Dependability, is investigating a variety of methods and tools for building reliable and secure software systems.

"Having two professors from Queen's University named as Canada Research Chairs in these areas of research is important. Software security and anti-cancer drugs are crucial to securing safe and successful communities and improving health outcomes. These are examples where Queen's leads in addressing the most challenging and complex problems facing the world today" says Dr. Steven Liss, Vice-Principal (Research).

In total, $124.5 million is being allocated among 132 Canada Research Chairs to undertake new, cutting-edge research at 36 Canadian postsecondary institutions.

Dr. Zongchao Jia, receives Queen's highest prize for research

Published Mon Mar 12/12 3:00pm.

Two scientists have received the Queen's Prize for Excellence in Research for the impact they’ve made in their respective fields.

Zongchao Jia’s (Biomedical and Molecular Sciences) research into bacteria helps make drinking water safer and organic chemist Victor Snieckus (Chemistry) has made major discoveries in the area of molecule synthesis, leading to anti-AIDS and anti-inflammatory drugs and grain crop protecting agents.

Dr. Jia is a Killam Research Fellow and the Canada Research Chair in Structural Biology.

His research group has determined that certain bacteria, including E. coli, have evolved by making an enzyme called AceK in order to survive under nutrient-deficient conditions. By revealing, AceK’s three-dimensional structure, Dr. Jia’s group has gained understanding into how this enzyme works and how intervention strategies can be explored to lock AceK in the high-nutrient state, thereby reducing the bacteria’s chance to survive under low-nutrient conditions such as in drinking water.

Dr. Snieckus (Chemistry) holds the Alfred Bader Chair in Organic Chemistry and director, Snieckus Innovations, a new Queen's initiative in its Industrial Park. He is internationally recognized for major technologies in how molecules are assembled and assisting pharmaceutical and agrochemical industry in development of new drugs and crop-yield enhancing agents.

Much of his work is related to boron, which he calls “the chemical element of the 21st century.” Boron compounds, in addition to being useful in synthesis of pharmaceuticals, are used as antifungal agents, detergents, in bulletproof vests, in emergency shutdown systems for nuclear reactors, and are now being developed as light-emitting devices and semi-conductors.

“The highest form of recognition from Queen’s for research conducted at the university is reflected in the Prize for Excellence in Research, where outstanding individuals are recognized by their peers,” says Steven N. Liss, Vice-Principal (Research). “This is the opportunity to recognize on an annual basis the outstanding accomplishments of our leading researchers and the work they have conducted at Queen’s that has led to significant discoveries, scholarly achievement and important innovations.

“The contributions of the 2011 winners, Drs. Jia and Snieckus, to the fields of biochemistry and structural biology, and synthetic organic chemistry, respectively, have far-reaching impact and advance the reputation of Queen’s as a world-class research-intensive university.”

Drs. Jia and Snieckus will deliver public lectures on Tuesday March 20th at 7pm in Chernoff Hall Auditorium, 90 Bader Lane.

Matched to Queen's? Congratulations!

Published Wed Mar 07/12 1:00pm.
Congratulations to all of the medical students who matched to Queen's.  You will receive your orientation packages later this month and in the meantime, please check out the New Resident section of our website for information on Queen's, Kingston, and much more.  We're looking forward to welcoming you to our community in July and if you have any questions, just email us at pgme@queensu.ca.

Babies the key to explaining hiccup reflex

Published Wed Mar 07/12 9:00am.

New research explains the mysterious hiccup reflex as a burping mechanism allowing young, feeding mammals to consume more milk.

The hiccup has long remained an enigma for clinicians and researchers, who have struggled to connect the physical mechanisms of a hiccup to a plausible evolutionary advantage. Read more...

Leading-edge postpartum health clinic targets cardiovascular disease risk

Published Wed Feb 29/12 3:00pm.

A Queen’s obstetrics professor has founded one of the first clinics in the world to use pregnancy and the postpartum as a key opportunity in a woman’s life to focus on disease prevention.

“This clinic is an extremely novel idea—no one else is doing this at present,” says Graeme Smith, who is also a practicing obstetrician at Kingston General Hospital (KGH).

Pregnancy is a stress test in that it can reveal underlying health issues in the mother that may indicate an increased risk of future heart disease. Around 20 per cent of expectant mothers experience at least one of six indicators during pregnancy including pre-eclampsia, high blood pressure, gestational diabetes, preterm birth, a growth restricted baby, or placental abruption leading to delivery. Read more...

Dr. Sarah Jones in CBC Radio 2 Documentary

Published Wed Feb 29/12 1:00pm.
Dr. Sarah Jones, Head of Pediatrics at Queen's is the subject of  The Hand of Fate, a documentary segment that aired Feb. 29th on The Current. In the summer of 2009, Sarah Jones was a pediatric surgeon hanging out with her family at their home in the country when an accident severed three of her fingers and part of her thumb. So how does a person whose work brings such a sense of purpose confront the consequences of one random moment?  Read more...

Queen's soft tissue replacement technology gets a funding boost

Published Wed Feb 29/12 11:00am.
A new process for transforming discarded human fat into a soft-tissue substitute for use in reconstructive surgery is laying the groundwork for creating an Ontario-based regenerative medicine initiative focused on developing products for reconstructive and cosmetic surgery. “Human fat is an abundant and accessible source of stem cells and proteins that can be used in tissue engineering,” says Lauren Flynn, Queen’s University chemical engineer who pioneered the process. “We use tissues that are normally discarded during surgery, to develop non-immunogenic structures that have shown great promise in promoting natural soft tissue regeneration.” Read more...

Medical Education Scholars

Published Fri Feb 17/12 10:00am.

The School of Medicine at Queen’s University is currently seeking Medical Education Scholars to join an academy of educational leaders, enabling continuous implementation of best principles and leading practices in medical education. Qualified applicants will hold an MD degree (or equivalent), have completed postgraduate qualifications prior to appointment, be eligible for licensure in Ontario and have outstanding emerging or established research programs in medical education. Successful candidates will be provided a minimum of 50% protected time to pursue research activities. They will also be expected to contribute to the teaching, supervision and mentorship of undergraduate, graduate and postgraduate students. Academic rank will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. For further information on the School of Medicine, please visit http://meds.queensu.ca/.

Review of applications will commence in May 2012 and continue until the positions are filled.  Applications should include a full curriculum vitae, a description of research accomplishments and future directions, and evidence of involvement in, and commitment to, medical education.  Identification of three referees who can attest to the applicant’s research capabilities and educational experience is requested. Applications are to be directed to: Dr. Richard Reznick, Dean, Faculty of Health Sciences, c/o Gail Knutson, Senior Staffing Officer, Macklem House, 18 Barrie Street, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada, K7L 3N6. E-mail:  gail.knutson@queensu.ca. The University thanks all who express an interest in these positions.

One of Canada’s leading universities, Queen’s has a long-standing reputation for academic excellence, research and a diverse and vibrant learning environment. With its strong tradition of public service, the University has helped to shape Canadian values and policies, educating notable political and cultural figures.

Queen’s University is located in the heart of the community in historic Kingston, midpoint between Montreal and Toronto, and the nation’s capital.

Queen’s is committed to employment equity and diversity in the workplace and welcomes applications from women, visible minorities, Aboriginal people, persons with disabilities, and persons of any sexual orientation or gender identity. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadian citizens and permanent residents will be given priority.

Health Professionals for a New Century:

Published Wed Feb 15/12 1:00pm.

Queen’s joins Canadian university collaborative to lead global health education innovation

Queen’s University and a consortium of four other Canadian universities are representing North America in a global initiative to transform the way we educate health care professionals world-wide. 

Following a rigorous international competition, the U.S Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) Board on Global Health chose only three other groups, (called “Innovation collaboratives”) based in India, Uganda and South Africa.

Dr. Margo Paterson, director of the Office of Inter-professional Education and Practice (OIPEP) is leading the Queen’s team.

The Canadian partnership: Canadian Interprofessional Health Leadership Collaborative (CIHLC) has worked together for many years and contributed to writing this proposal.

“We are excited to have this opportunity to consolidate our past experiences and build capacity around the topic of collaborative health leadership over the next few years of the CIHLC project,” says Dr. Paterson.

The CIHLC includes Queen’s, the University of Toronto, the University of British Columbia, Northern Ontario School of Medicine and Universite Laval as well as their affiliated networks across multiple sites in Canada, the United States and globally.

“We are really proud to have Queen’s a play a significant role in innovating the training of health care professionals worldwide through this Canadian partnership,” says, Dr. Richard Reznick, dean Faculty of Health Sciences. “I believe the Faculty of Health Sciences has much to contribute to this project, through our expertise in inter-professional education, competency-based medical education and global successes in community-based rehabilitation.”

CIHLC and the other “collaboratives” are intended to incubate and pilot ideas for reforming health professional education called for in the seminal Lancet Commission report (2010) and will be a key part of IOM’s new Global Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education, to be launched in March 2012.

For more information about this project (U.S. IOM site):

http://www.healthprofessionals21.org/index.php/news-a-events/105-iom-selects-four-innovation-collaboratives

Bell creates world's first chair in anti-stigma research at Queen's

Published Tue Feb 07/12 12:00pm.

Bell Canada and Queen's University have announced a world-first with the establishment of a new $1-million research initiative to help fight stigma associated with mental illness.

The Bell Mental Health and Anti-Stigma Research Chair will enable Queen’s Faculty of Health Sciences to advance its anti-stigma research, scholarship and outreach programs. Read more...

Roger G. Deeley reappointed Vice-Dean Research in the Faculty of Health Sciences and Vice President Health Sciences Research at Kingston General Hospital

Published Mon Feb 06/12 2:00pm.
Roger Deeley has been reappointed as Vice-Dean Research in the Faculty of Health Sciences at Queen’s University and Vice President Health Sciences Research at Kingston General Hospital and for the Kingston teaching hospitals for a second five-year term commencing January 1, 2012. These appointments are announced by Dr. Alan Harrison, Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) at Queen’s University, and Ms. Leslee Thompson, President and Chief Executive Officer at Kingston General Hospital. Read more...

A New Health Care System for all Canadians: From Consensus to Action

Published Wed Feb 01/12 10:00am.

Dr. Jeff Turnbull is Ottawa Hospital Chief of Staff and the immediate past president of the Canadian Medical Association. Since earning his M.D. at Queen’s University, he has combined clinical practice, education and research with senior management roles at both the University of Western Ontario and the University of Ottawa. In 2001, he was appointed chair of the Department of Medicine and, in 2008, Chief of Staff at The Ottawa Hospital. Read more...

Heart drug may be effective for managing certain cancers, study finds

Published Fri Dec 16/11 9:00am.

Researchers at Queen’s University have identified a new mechanism that could potentially explain why the body’s immune system sometimes fails to eliminate cancer. The new findings shed light on the possible cause of immune resistance in cancer cells, and indicate that nitroglycerin, a relatively safe and low-cost drug used for more than a century to treat angina, may be effective for managing certain cancers.

“This discovery may lead to new approaches for the treatment of patients with certain forms of cancer,” said Charles Graham, a professor in the Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences who lead the Queen’s research team with Robert Siemens of the Department of Urology and Kingston General Hospital.
The researchers looked at the role that hypoxia, or low oxygen content in tissues, plays in the ability of some cancer cells to escape detection, and subsequent destruction, by the body’s immune system.

They discovered that hypoxia in a cancer cell is linked to the overproduction of a key enzyme, ADAM10, which makes the cell resistant to attack by immune cells. However, when cells were treated with a nitric oxide mimicking agent such as nitroglycerin, hypoxic conditions were overcome and the cancer cells lost their resistance to an immune system attack. The results indicate that nitroglycerin could potentially be used to boost the body’s natural immune response to cancer.

The research leading to these findings is funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CHIR) in partnership with the Terry Fox Foundation Training Program in Transdisciplinary Cancer Research.

The discovery builds on the Queen’s team’s 2009 findings related to the role of nitric oxide in suppressing tumour growth in prostate cancer. The researchers conducted the first-ever clinical trial using low doses of nitroglycerin to treat prostate cancer.

More than 10 patents have been issued to Queen’s research discoveries involving the the use of nitroglycerin and similar compounds in cancer treatments. PARTEQ Innovations, the technology transfer office of Queen’s, has licensed some of this intellectual property to Nometics Inc., a Queen’s spinoff company, which is developing products and therapies based on this and related research.

The study results have been published online and in an upcoming issue of the American Association of Cancer Research peer-reviewed journal Cancer Research.

Survival rates increase with chemotherapy alone in patients with limited-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma

Published Mon Dec 12/11 11:00am.

New research led by the NCIC Clinical Trials Group (CTG) at Queen’s University has proven patients with limited stage Hodgkin’s lymphoma have a better chance of long-term survival if they undergo a standard chemotherapy regimen as opposed to radiation-based treatment.

“These results will influence current treatment practices and lead to more patients being treated with chemotherapy alone,” says Dr. Ralph Meyer, professor of oncology at Queen’s and director of the NCIC CTG. “This trial exemplifies the importance of academic groups conducting trials that assess long-term patient outcomes.” Read full article...

Bleeding disorder experts named researchers of the year

Published Tue Nov 29/11 9:00am.
Queen’s pathology and molecular medicine professors Paula James and David Lillicrap were named Researchers of the Year by the National Hemophilia Foundation in Chicago for their work in helping to improve the lives of patients living with bleeding disorders. Read more...

House of Horrors

Published Mon Nov 28/11 12:00pm.
Just in time for Hallowe’en, and in celebration of Canadian Patient Safety Week, on the evenings of  Nov. 1 and 2 a total of 52 students from Rehabilitation Therapy (Occupational and Physical Therapy), Medicine and Nursing as well as Pharmacy residents and staff participated in Read more...

Inaugural Head, Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences

Published Sun Nov 27/11 10:00pm.
Applications and nominations are invited for the position of Head of the Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario. For this tenured position, we are searching for an outstanding academic with proven leadership and administrative skills. Read more...

Dean of Health Sciences earns prestigious fellowship

Published Mon Nov 14/11 9:00am.

RCSI Honourary DegreeRichard Reznick has been granted an honourary fellowship from the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI). This fellowship is the highest honour the college can give and only a few are awarded each year.

“I have been extremely privileged over the years to have interacted with the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons in Ireland,” says Dr. Reznick, dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences.” We have exchanged views, shared information, and collaborated on many issues. To be recognized by the college with an honorary fellowship is a great honour that is a highlight of my professional career.”

The Royal College of Surgeons is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to improving human health through education, research and service. Founded in 1784, originally to train surgeons, today it provides education and training in the healthcare professions at both undergraduate and postgraduate level. RCSI has been granting the honourary fellowship since 1784.

Along with receiving the honour, Dr. Reznick will be appearing as a guest lecturer speaking on Better, Faster, Cheaper ... Pick Two.

PGME Fall Newsletter Now Available

Published Tue Nov 08/11 10:00am.
The Fall 2011 edition of the PGME Resident Newsletter is now available.  It has been emailed to all residents, Program Directors, and Program Assistants.

Vice-Dean (Health Sciences) and Director, School of Rehabilitation Therapy Faculty of Health Sciences

Published Fri Nov 04/11 10:00am.
Applications and nominations are invited for the position of Vice-Dean (Health Sciences) and Director of the School of Rehabilitation Therapy at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario. We are searching for an outstanding academic with proven administrative and fundraising experience. The ideal candidate will be a visionary and innovative leader who is able to mobilize resources and engender a strong and vigorous academic environment. As Vice-Dean and Director, the successful candidate will draw on strong interpersonal and organizational skills Read more...

Head of the Department of Medicine Position

Published Thu Nov 03/11 5:00pm.
Applications are invited for the position of Head of the Department of Medicine at Queen’s University, Hotel Dieu Hospital, Kingston General Hospital and Providence Care, which are fully affiliated teaching hospitals. We are searching for an academic physician with proven administrative experience and leadership skills who is engaged in the practice of medicine and who, as Head, will draw on strong interpersonal and organizational skills to develop and manage teams that will foster excellence in teaching, patient care and research within the Department and the region. The qualified applicant must be eligible for licensure in Ontario. Read more...

Good grades for postgraduate medical education review!

Published Wed Oct 12/11 11:00am.
Queen’s postgraduate medical education has received its most successful accreditation review in recent memory.

“The reviewers told us they were blown away by Queen’s. They complimented us virtually each and every time we met with them,” says Richard Reznick, Dean, Faculty of Health Sciences, and Director, School of Medicine.

The accreditation team of 20 physicians and educators conducted a detailed review of the teaching programs, inspected and analyzed the teaching sites, and examined the medical school and postgraduate medical office.

The team was most impressed by faculty members’ pride in being ‘Queen’s doctors’ and program directors’ energy, commitment and ‘parental view’ of responsibility to their residents. They praised faculty members’ creativity and the university’s cutting edge simulation efforts.

The accreditation team is recommending full approval to the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and the Canadian Family Physicians of Canada for 27 of Queen’s 29 programs. The two other programs will receive provisional approval.

Dr. Reznick credits the faculty, teachers, program directors and 10 partnering hospitals for the successful accreditation review. He also praised Ross Walker, Associate Dean, Postgraduate Education, and his team for the hard work they put in each day on behalf of the trainees.

Dr. Reznick shares his thoughts about the accreditation review on his blog.

New Medicine building fosters enhanced learning opportunities

Published Tue Sep 27/11 8:00am.

From the outside, the new School of Medicine Building stands as an architecturally stunning addition to campus. What’s going on inside the facility is just as impressive.

“It’s going to be an exciting year in undergraduate medical education. Many of our faculty have redesigned and enhanced their learning events, with a greater balance of lectures and independent group learning,” says Anthony Sanfilippo, Associate Dean, Undergraduate Medical Education. Read more...

Hundreds celebrate opening of new home for Queen's School of Medicine

Published Fri Sep 23/11 11:00am.
With bagpipes, balloons and a balmy breeze off Lake Ontario, an enthusiastic crowd of more than 400 Health Sciences donors, alumni, students, faculty and university and city officials celebrated the grand opening today of the university’s stunning new School of Medicine building. Read more...

To view more more pictures of the opening, visit Scott Adamson’s blog site at http://scottadamson.ca/blog/new-medical-building-grand-opening/

 

The Queen's Health and Human Rights Conference

Published Wed Sep 21/11 10:00am.
The Queen's Health and Human Rights Conference is an award-winning, annual event coordinated by the students of Queen's University. This inter-disciplinary conference unites speakers from various academic disciplines and professions, and invites discourse on both local and global issues within the realm of Health and Human Rights.  More Information...

Congratulations to Dr. Terence Ozolins

Published Sun Sep 04/11 7:00pm.

Congratulations to Dr. Terence Ozolins for his recent success in receiving a CFI award!   Well done!

Terence Ozolins (School of Medicine) has been awarded $120,000 for his research on structural malformations of the heart. These malformations are the most common birth defect and recent evidence suggests structural defects may also have long-term unwanted effects on heart function. Dr. Ozolins is seeking to discover why these malformations occur and develop intervention strategies that improve patient health.”

Class of 2015 is off to a great start!

Published Wed Aug 31/11 11:00pm.

Faculty and UGME staff coming into 132a in the new Meds building on the morning of Tuesday, August 30 were treated to a very encouraging sight:  the class of 2015 was sitting in their new chairs, at the new tables, discussing in groups!  Just as all of the planners had hoped!  It was the beginning of a short series of talks, and getting to know staff, faculty and students from the class of Meds 2014…
Read full story...

International Award for Excellence

Published Fri Aug 19/11 10:00am.

Dr. Lindsay Davidson, Loretta Walz, and Dr. Nancy Dalgarno, win International Award for Excellence in the area of learning and education.

Lindsay Davidson and Loretta Walz of Queen’s UGME, and Nancy Dalgarno, of Queen’s Health Sciences Interprofessional Education, won the International Award for Excellence from Ubiquitous Learning, an organization that sponsors a scholarly journal, a conference, a book series and an online community.  The article published in the journal, Simple Technology Facilitating Complex Communities: A New  Paradigm for Interprofessional Education? was selected by the editors  for the award from the ten highest-ranked papers emerging from the  referee process. For a summary of the project Learning with Cases which was the focus of the article, see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qNP4WXvzbrQ or go to https://meds.queensu.ca/courses/community/learningwithcases.

As the winning authors the three authors are invited to present a featured session at the upcoming Ubiquitous Learning Conference to be held at the University of California, 11 to 12 November 2011, in Berkeley, California. They will be formally acknowledged in a short presentation. 

Congratulations to these three educators in health sciences on their valued contribution.

Street Health Services - Kingston

Published Thu Aug 18/11 10:00am.
Are you a general practitioner? Health care service provider?
Do you have questions about Hepatitis C:

  • Testing?
  • Diagnosis?
  • Treatment?
  • Follow-up?
Are you interested in learning more about Hepatitis C co-infection? Curious about treatment options and disease progression? Would you like to know more about the current challenges faced by people with Hepatitis C?

The Street Health Centre has a multidisciplinary clinical health team that will assist you or your practice. Download a flyer about their services and contacts.

Finding could reduce antibiotic use in critically ill patients

Published Mon Aug 15/11 8:00am.

Measuring the levels of a natural body chemical may allow doctors to reduce the duration of antibiotic use and improve the health outcomes of critically ill patients.
“Infection is a common and expensive complication of critical illness and we’re trying to find  Read more...

Dean of Health Sciences praised for innovations in surgical education

Published Fri Jul 15/11 3:00pm.

The dean of Queen’s Faculty of Health Sciences recently joined a small, illustrious group of Canadians who have received an honorary fellowship from the Royal College of Surgeons in Edinburgh.

The College, founded in 1505, recognized Richard Reznick for his commitment to surgical eucation, simulation, research and academia.

“I am humbled to be honoured by one of the world’s oldest medical colleges and considered in the same light as some of the surgical icons who have received honorary fellowships in the past,” he says. Read Full Story...

Master of Science Physical Therapy Program at Queen's

Published Mon Jul 11/11 8:00am.

With help from Goldman Sachs, students applying to the Master of Science Physical Therapy Program at Queen's will get a helping hand.

The Goldman Sachs Scholars Fund has been established with a grant of $346,000 (USD) made to Queen’s University at Kingston by the Goldman Sachs Gives program, on the recommendation of Goldman Sachs employee, David Torrible, a Queen’s graduate, in honour of parents, Geoffrey and Elizabeth Torrible.

The funds will be used to provide scholarships to students at the University who qualify for financial aid under the University's financial aid policy, with a preference for eligible full-time students in the Master of Science Physical Therapy program in the School of Graduate Studies. First preference will be given to students who self-identify as the children of immigrant parents (parents born outside of Canada), or students from a rural or remote area of Canada. Qualification for funding will also be based on good academic standing which includes good communicative and interpersonal skills.

Dale Dauphinee Fellowship

Published Fri Jul 08/11 2:00pm.
Congratulations to Michelle Gibson on winning the Dale Dauphinee fellowship granted by the Medical Council of Canada  Read more...

Queen's doc heads up Wait Time Alliance

Published Tue Jul 05/11 2:00pm.
Christopher Simpson has been elected as the incoming chair of the Wait Time Alliance (WTA), a federation of 14 medical and surgical specialty societies whose members are concerned about delayed access to care for their patients. Read full story...

Gold Poster Award to Da Duan

Published Mon Jul 04/11 3:00pm.
Dr. Alain Beaudet, President, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, presents CIHR - Gold Poster Award to Da Duan, Queen's University.
more...

Finding reduces swine fetal loss, nets researcher prestigious award

Published Fri Jun 24/11 11:15am.

A new drug that stimulates the growth of new blood vessels in the uterus lining of pigs could be on the market in a couple of years. The drug will significantly impact the commercial swine industry by addressing spontaneous fetal loss and increasing litter size.
Queen’s Chandra Tayade has received a prestigious award from the American Society for Reproductive Immunology (ASRI) for his research. Read more...

First diagnostic test for hereditary children's disease

Published Thu Jun 23/11 4:00pm.
A breakthrough in genetic research has uncovered the defect behind a rare hereditary children’s disease that inhibits the body’s ability to break down vitamin D. This discovery has led researchers to develop the first genetic and biochemical tests that positively identify the disease. Read more...

2011 Convocation

Published Fri Jun 17/11 3:00pm.

© 2011 Photograph by Jackie DuffinConvocation celebrations for the Class of 2011 were held on May 27th at Grant Hall. Surrounded by family, friends, faculty, staff and community members 98 students received their MD degrees after four years of inquiry, discovery and hard work.  A highlight of the afternoon was the delivery of a moving address by honorary degree recipient, Dr. Izzeldin Abuelaish.  His message of courage, justice, perseverance and human kindness will be drawn on as a source of inspiration for all who were privileged to hear it.

The Class of 2011 will soon begin their residency training spread across 13 learning sites in both Canada and the United States. As a group, these young physicians will be pursuing careers in 19 different medical specialties with 27 graduates having chosen Family Medicine.

Congratulations to the Class of 2011 and to the faculty, staff and families who supported them through the first chapter of what promises to be productive and fulfilling medical careers!
© 2011 Photograph by Jackie Duffin

UGME Curriculum Map

Published Thu Jun 09/11 4:00pm.

In an effort to facilitate the effective review of the content and structure of the UGME curriculum extensive work has been done over the past several months to complete a preliminary version of a curriculum map.

The UGME curriculum map is housed live in MEdTech Central and captures a variety of information.  For each learning event in UGME the map presently records an overview of the session’s content, its curricular objectives, the applicable Medical College of Canada presentations, and any applicable Hot Topics (Hot Topics are items that the school is required to track by the Liaison Committee for Medical Education).  The map also stores information like the teacher, students, and all resources, including pod casts, associated with a learning event.  The information stored in the curriculum map is searchable through MEdTech’s Curriculum Search feature and the Learning Events tab.

A curriculum map is meant to be ‘alive’ and should be constantly updated.  To that end teaching faculty across UGME are invited to review their learning events on MEdTech Central and edit them as appropriate.  Work is ongoing towards improving the curriculum mapping process and to that end some minor changes will be made to the MEdTech interface this fall.

UGME Curriculum Leaders' Retreat:

Published Wed Jun 08/11 2:00pm.

Course Directors, Competency Leads, Year Directors and other curriculum leaders in Queen’s UGME gathered at the Radisson Hotel on May 20, 2011 for a day-long retreat on teaching and curriculum.  Organized by Dr. Elaine Van Melle and the UGME Teaching and Learning Committee, the topics of communication among courses, strategies for small group learning, and developing and using online modules were selected through a survey of Course Directors.   Read more...


After Colon Cancer Surgery, Early Chemo May Pay Off

Published Tue Jun 07/11 9:15am.

SATURDAY, June 4 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer, a new study suggests that the sooner chemotherapy starts following the operation, the better the prognosis.

For every month after the first four weeks post-surgery that chemotherapy is delayed, odds of survival decrease measurably, the Canadian researchers found.

"What our research has indicated is that giving chemo early rather than later after surgery is associated with improved survival," said study lead author Dr. James J. Biagi, a medical oncologist and head of the oncology department at Queens University, in Kingston, Ontario. "Giving it later appears to be detrimental."

"But at the same time, we also believe that it still might be worthwhile having a patient look to chemotherapy even if they wouldn't be starting until the three-month point," Biagi added. Traditionally, oncologists avoided recommending chemo after...       Read Full Story

Queen's celebrates government support for Medical School building

Published Fri Jun 03/11 1:00pm.
With fresh paint still gleaming in its elegant new School of Medicine building, Queen’s University held a celebration today to recognize the generous support of federal and provincial governments in funding the $77-million state-of-the-art facility.

Ontario Minister of Training, Colleges and Universities John Milloy, with Kingston and The Islands MPP John Gerretsen, helped Principal Daniel Woolf, Dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences Richard Reznick, President of the medical student government “TJ” Thurashen Jeyalingam, former Health Sciences dean David Walker and former principal Tom Williams symbolically lay the cornerstone of the new building at the corner of Arch and Stuart Streets.

“We are extremely grateful to our partners from the federal and provincial governments for their magnificent investment in medical education at Queen’s,” said Principal Woolf.  “This new building is much more than just modern facilities. With it comes a spirit of renewal and revitalization. We look towards positive change in the way we educate our health professionals, and we expect Queen’s to be at the leading edge of emerging novel educational processes.”

“Having one of the premier teaching facilities in North America will help Queen’s continue to attract the best medical students, faculty and staff, and provide an unparalleled educational experience for our doctors of tomorrow,” said Dean Reznick, noting that more than 40 per cent of doctors working in Southeastern Ontario received their education at Queen’s. “Our beautiful new facility aligns with the government’s priority to increase the number of well-trained and well-educated health care professionals in our region, in the province and in the country.”

Following the ceremony, current medical students led guided tours of the 5-storey building, including a hands-on demonstration in the surgical skills and simulation lab, equipped with high-tech mannequins, observation rooms and recording facilities.

The new School of Medicine building received a Government of Canada investment of $28.8 million through the Knowledge Infrastructure Program (KIP) and $28.8 million from the Ontario government through the 2009 Budget. The balance of $19.4 million will be provided by gifts from alumni, friends, faculty and students, of which 98 per cent has been secured including $500,000 pledged by current and future students and $1.5 million from Queen’s Clinical Teachers Association.

Work will continue over the summer to complete the finishing touches on the facility, which will be fully functional for the start of the academic year. A grand opening for the facility is scheduled for Sept. 22.

Thank you.

Published Tue May 31/11 5:00am.
I am writing on behalf of the Queen’s University Genetically Engineered Machine (QGEM) Team. We are writing to thank you for the School of Medicine’s contribution to the 2010 team. With your help we were able to complete all of our experiments and make working DNA constructs. Your support was integral to our success at the International Genetically Engineered Machine Competition (iGEM).  Read more...

Congratulations to Dr. Chandrakant Tayade

Published Thu May 26/11 4:00pm.
We are pleased to announce that Dr. Chandrakant Tayade is the recipient of the 2011 J. Christian Herr Award for excellence in reproductive immunology research from the American Society for Reproductive Immunology.
This award was given to him at the 31st Annual Meeting of The American Society for Reproductive Immunology that took place in Salt Lake City, Utah, May 19-22, 2011.

Distinguished Service Award winners announced

Published Wed May 18/11 2:00pm.
David Walker, alumnus and former dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences. Dr. Walker, a highly visible supporter of Queen’s, used his leadership skills to get the new Medical School building off the ground during his tenure as dean. Read more...

Researchers discover protein that could help prevent the spread of cancer

Published Fri May 13/11 3:00pm.

A protein capable of halting the spread of breast cancer cells could lead to a therapy for preventing or limiting the spread of the disease.

“Cancer researchers want to design new therapeutic strategies in which the metastasis or spreading stage of cancer can be blocked,” explains Andrew Craig, lead researcher and a professor in Queen’s Department of Biochemistry and Cancer Research Institute. “Patients stand a much better chance of survival if the primary tumor is the only tumor that needs to be treated.” Read Full Article

Proposed Workload Standard for the New Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences

Published Thu May 05/11 9:00am.

The mandate of the Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences is to promote and enhance learning and scholarship in the biomedical and molecular sciences. All faculty members appointed to the Department are expected to contribute to this mandate through effective participation in:  Read more...

Researchers discover protein that could help prevent the spread of cancer

Published Tue May 03/11 12:00pm.

A protein capable of halting the spread of breast cancer cells could lead to a therapy for preventing or limiting the spread of the disease.

“Cancer researchers want to design new therapeutic strategies in which the metastasis or spreading stage of cancer can be blocked,” explains Andrew Craig, lead researcher and a professor in Queen’s Department of Biochemistry and Cancer Research Institute. “Patients stand a much better chance of survival if the primary tumor is the only tumor that needs to be treated.” Read Full Article

Extracting stem cells from fat for tissue regeneration

Published Tue May 03/11 7:00am.
Stem cells extracted from body fat may pave the way for the development of new regenerative therapies including soft tissue reconstruction following tumor removal or breast mastectomy surgery, the development of tissue-engineered cartilage or bone, and the treatment of cardiovascular disease.

An interdisciplinary team of Queen’s University researchers led by Dr. Lauren Flynn, a professor in the Departments of Chemical Engineering and Anatomy and Cell Biology, has been working with stem cells extracted from samples of human fat and is developing new methods in the lab to develop these cells into mature tissue substitutes.

Read Full Article...

Seeking Volunteers

Published Sat Apr 23/11 11:00pm.
Do you have an interest in health care or in ensuring that the patients at Kingston General Hospital receive the best care?  We are seeking individuals to volunteer in programs throughout the hospital both in patient and non-patient care.  We have exciting opportunities in which you not only get to improve the patient experience, you get to learn about careers in health care and the way in which the hospital functions.  Our volunteers committed over 80,000 hours last year alone.  We invite you to consider joining the KGH team.  Visit our website (http://www.kgh.on.ca/en/workwithus/volunteeratkgh/Pages/default.aspx) to find out more.

Professors rewarded for outstanding contributions

Published Fri Apr 22/11 11:30pm.

Two Queen’s professors have received prestigious awards for their work in the field of pharmacology and toxicology.
Louise Winn (Pharmacology and Toxicology and Environmental Studies) has received the 2011 Women in Toxicology Mentoring Award from the Society of Toxicology (SOT). The international award recognizes an outstanding record of achievement in the mentoring of women in the discipline of toxicology. Read Full Article...

Let there be light: new medical school building nears completion

Published Wed Apr 06/11 9:00am.
Queen’s new medical school building on the corner of Arch and Stuart Streets is now 85 per cent complete, says senior project manager Mike Finn (shown standing on the top level of what has been dubbed “the glass lantern” Read more...

Congratulations Dr. Tron

Published Tue Mar 29/11 3:00pm.
The Canadian Association of Pathologists has made Dr. Tron the William Boyd Lecturer for 2011. The lecture will take place in Vancouver, British Columbia on June 5th, 2011.

Dr. Jim Brien Receives Pfizer Senior Scientist Award

Published Wed Mar 23/11 3:00pm.
Another stellar member of the Department of Pharmacology & Toxicology is being recognized for his contributions!  

It is a great pleasure for me to inform you that Dr. Jim Brien has been selected to receive the Canadian Society for Pharmacology and Therapeutics (CSPT) Pfizer Senior Scientist Award.  This award is given to a member of CSPT for significant contributions to the advancement and extension of knowledge in the field.  

The Pfizer Award is the most prestigious award for contributions to the field of Pharmacology and Therapeutics in Canada, and it recognizes outstanding achievements during a scientist's career.  A number of Canada's leading researchers have received the award over the years.

Dr. Brien will receive the award and will deliver the Pfizer Prize Oration, describing his research achievements, during the CSPT Annual Meeting in Montreal in May.

Needless to say, we in Pharm & Tox are extremely proud of Jim for his well-deserved receipt of this honour.

Teaching Improvement Project Systems Course (TIPS) for Faculty and Residents

Published Tue Mar 22/11 1:00pm.
Teaching Improvement Project Systems Course (TIPS) for Faculty and Residents
Thursday, April 7th & Friday, April 8th, 2011 (8-4 each day)
Bracken Library, Queen's University

This is an intensive workshop which includes presentations, discussions and individual work. The objectives are achieved
through experience in defining objectives, planning lectures/seminars and demonstrations, preparing in structural
materials and practising teaching skills. Participants prepare and present two ten-minute teaching sessions from their
own lectures/seminars ("microteaches"). Each of these is videotaped for private viewing and evaluation followed by
individual discussion with a leader. The basis for this workshop is the Teaching Improvement Project System (TIPS) developed by the University of Kentucky Centre for Learning Resources through grants from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation and DHEW.PHS, for the improvement of teaching in the health sciences. Since its inception in 1975, TIPS programs have reached several thousand educators in the United States and Canada.

Family medicine professor wins prestigious international award

Published Tue Mar 22/11 10:00am.

Ruth Wilson, a family physician with the Queen’s Family Health Team, recently received a prestigious international medical award.

The family medicine professor is one of only two recipients of the Wonca 5-Star Doctor Award – the highest award for doctors from the World Organization of National Colleges, Academies and Academic Associations of General Practitioners/Family Physicians (Wonca).

“This is a tremendous honour. I’ve had a lot of people come up to me jokingly asking how it feels to be one of the best doctors in the world,’” says Dr. Wilson, who is past president of the College of Family Physicians of Canada. Read more...

Dr. Louise M. Winn has received the 2011 Women in Toxicology Mentoring Award

Published Thu Mar 17/11 9:00am.
Dr. Louise M. Winn of the Department of Pharmacology & Toxicology and the School of Environmental Studies, has received the 2011 Women in Toxicology Mentoring Award from the Society of Toxicology (SOT). The award recognizes an outstanding record of achievement in the mentoring of women in the discipline of Toxicology. It was presented at the SOT annual meeting, which was held in Washington DC from March 6 to 10, and was attended by over 8,000 registrants.

U.S. health care reforms should use model developed by Queen's professor

Published Tue Mar 15/11 10:00am.

A model of health care developed by a Queen's University doctor should be studied and copied as a way to reform health care in the U.S.

The U.S. is facing a problem of adding 40 million people to its health care system if President Obama's health care reforms are passed and Ontario’s Family Health Team Model (FHT) could help ease the burden.

"What we are saying is that Ontario’s FHT model is a very effective and efficient way of providing health care," says Walter Rosser, professor in the Department of Family Medicine. “It should be part of the solution for health system reform in both Canada and the United States.”

The United States has a similar program known as patient-centered medical homes but it’s used on a much smaller scale.

Ontario has the largest example of this type of health care model being used in North America, so medical officials everywhere are interested to learn how effective it is on a large scale.

“There are a few patient-centered medical homes developed in the U.S. and some experts are thinking FHTs may become the model that will be used very widely in the U.S.,” says Dr. Rosser who is also a doctor at Kingston General Hospital.

Dr. Rosser is one of several pioneers of FHTs, first implemented in 2005. FHTs use experts from various disciplines – such as physicians, nurses, nurse practioners, dietitians, social workers – all working closely together to take care of people. It also uses an innovative incentive-based funding system that generates higher income for doctors. Preliminary observations suggest patients and doctors are happier. The program, which only operates in Ontario, is now expanding from 170 FHTs today to 200 FHTs in the near future.
Whether the FHT model spreads across the U.S will depend on their government.

“Because our results are still preliminary, government officials want to wait a little longer to see how effective these Ontario FHT models are,” says Dr. Rosser.

Dr. Rosser co-authored the recommendation in an article published in the March-April issue of Annals of Family Medicine.

Canadian Association for Medical Education (CAME) 2011 Certificate of Merit Award Winner:

Published Mon Mar 14/11 2:00am.
Dr. Lindsay Davidson. What a wonderful recognition of your terrific educational contributions.
You bring pride to the Faculty and we benefit from your outstanding achievement.
 All my best,
Richard

Queen's Team won in the National Health Care Team Challenge

Published Mon Mar 14/11 12:00am.
On Friday March 11  our  FHS Queen's Team of Jenn Bossio (Clinical Psychology), Nicole Leakey (OT) , Laura Lu (Nursing) , Lucinda Ling (PT) and Karim Mohamed (Medicine) participated in the National Health Care Team Challenge held at the University of Toronto. Read more...

George Lovell and Zongchao Jia Awarded 2011 Killam Research Fellowships

Published Wed Mar 02/11 10:00am.

Natural Sciences – Biochemistry

Zongchao Jia, Queen’s University, Structural studies of a bifunctional kinase/phosphatase AceK and its applications in water-borne disease suppression and biotechnology

Dr. Jia’s research will focus on the impact of a protein found within
E. coli called AceK that could be targeted to inhibit bacterial growth in water and food sources. He will also examine the possibility of using AceK in the creation of biomolecules with reduced cost and CO2 emission. A well-published scientist, Dr. Jia has been recognized through many awards and research grants and his work is often cited by other research groups. More information: http://structure.biochem.queensu.ca

Social Sciences – Historical Geography

W. George Lovell, Queen’s University, Enduring conquest: a cultural history of the Guatemalan Maya

The fellowship will give Professor Lovell time to synthesize four decades of research on how the Guatemalan Maya have survived cycles of conquest, allowing him to produce a book that documents remarkable cultural resilience and speaks to the strength of the human spirit. An internationally recognized scholar of Maya peoples in Guatemala, he is currently on sabbatical leave as visiting professor in Latin American history at the Universidad Pablo de Olavide in Spain. Read full story

 

Former Dean leads provincial action team

Published Tue Feb 22/11 8:00am.

The immediate past dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences is heading a new provincial action team to address the increasingly serious challenge of providing appropriate care for elderly and long-term patients in Ontario's health care system. Read more...

New educational DVD improves female pelvic exam instruction

Published Fri Feb 18/11 3:00pm.
Two years ago, Robert Reid realized he gave the same tutorial to every medical student at each gynaecology clinic he conducted. Was there a way, he wondered, to transform this tutorial into an educational film for medical students?


Along with medical student Bryden Magee, Dr. Reid, a Queen’s University professor in Obstetrics and Gynaecology, and Chair of the Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility at Kingston General Hospital, began working with volunteers to film demonstrations of pelvic and bimanual exam techniques.
“Bimanual exams are the type of pelvic exam that medical students watch but often have no idea what’s really going on,” explains Dr. Reid, whose own tutorial was included in the final 17-minute DVD.

The team also hired professional artist Kathy Piercy to produce anatomical renderings that demonstrate the internal examination techniques used by doctors during a pelvic exam.

To test the ability of the DVD to convey information and instill confidence among inexperienced medical students the team tested students before and after viewing key segments of the DVD. The students’ knowledge and confidence in conducting a first pelvic examination was vastly improved after they watched the DVD.

Additionally, a follow-up research study found that inexperienced medical students who watched the DVD all scored highly on a practical pelvic-exam assessment without additional coaching. Fifty-three per cent of these students received an honours grade of 80 per cent or higher.

Pelvic exams are usually taught through a combination of lectures, plastic models or simulators, or with the assistance of volunteer female Gynaecological Teaching Associates (GTA) who are available for repeat pelvic examinations at a cost of $200 per medical student.

“The cost to the medical schools of hiring GTAs for a large cohort of medical students can amount to thousands of dollars per year,” says Dr. Reid. “Due to scheduling challenges students may receive their hands-on training from the GTAs months before their first clinic experience and essential steps may be forgotten. Better alternatives are needed.”

The Academic Professionals in Obstetrics and Gynaecology (APOG) has already endorsed the video as an education tool for universities across Canada. Dr. Ruth Ronn, a resident now working with Dr. Reid, will present the latest research on the effectiveness of the DVD at a national conference of the American Association of Professors of Obstetrics and Gynaecology in San Antonio, Texas, in March.

Acting Head of Oncology

Published Mon Dec 20/10 3:00pm.
Dr. James Biagi's appointment as Acting Head of Oncology at Queen's University, Hotel Dieu Hospital and Kingston General Hospital has been extended for a six-month period from January 1, 2011 to June 30, 2011.

Dr. Russell J. Hollins appointed Acting Head of Otolaryngology

Published Tue Dec 14/10 3:00pm.
Russel Hollins has been appointed Acting Head of Otolaryngology at Queen's University, Hotel Dieu Hospital and Kingston General Hospital for an 18-month term from January 1, 2011 to June 30, 2012.

Dr. Rosser will be inducted as a Member of the Order of Canada

Published Wed Nov 17/10 8:00am.
Dr. Rosser will be inducted as a Member of the Order of Canada tomorrow (Wednesday, November 17, 2010) The Investiture Ceremony begins at 10:28 a.m. and can be seen via C.P.A.C.. On behalf of the Department of Family Medicine at Queen's University, our best wishes are extended to Dr. Rosser.

Queen's professor and alumni receive Order of Canada

Published Wed Nov 17/10 7:00am.
The former head of Queen's family medicine department has been named to the Order of Canada. Walter Rosser stepped down as head of the department three years ago and is now semi-retired. He was cited for his leadership in the discipline of family medicine and primary care research, and for his contributions to the establishment of practice-based research networks in Canada. Read more...

Michael A. Adams appointed Interim Head

Published Wed Nov 03/10 1:00pm.
Vice-Dean Academic Iain Young and I are pleased to announce that Principal Daniel Woolf has appointed Professor Michael Adams as the Interim Head of the Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences for a two-year term commencing November 1, 2010. In this position, Professor Adams will play an integral role in leading the implementation and. Read more...

Queen's computer-assisted surgery projects receive NSERC funding

Published Tue Nov 02/10 9:30am.
Two Queen's research projects looking at improved outcomes for joint surgery have received National Science and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) funding. James Stewart and Randy Ellis (School of Computing) each received close to $300,000 over the next three years. Read more...

$1.5 million supports international study on mobility loss in seniors

Published Tue Nov 02/10 9:00am.
Queens University researchers are leading an international study exploring both individual and community factors that keep people from remaining physically active. Read more...

Michael McGrath has been reappointed

Published Mon Nov 01/10 10:00am.
Michael McGrath has been reappointed as Head of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at Queens University and at Kingston General and Hotel Dieu Hospitals for a second term from July 1, 2010 to June 30, 2013. These appointments are announced by Dr. Daniel Woolf, Principal of Queens University, Read more...

Family Medicine professor leads $11.7 million project to help fight chronic disease

Published Mon Oct 25/10 9:00am.
A new, ground-breaking project led by a Queens University professor is going to improve the primary care management of Canadians battling five chronic diseases.
Richard Birtwhistle chairs the Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network (CPCSSN) a national project just announced by the federal government Read more...

Head of the Department of Oncology, Position Available

Published Thu Oct 21/10 3:00pm.
Applications are invited for the position of Head of the Department of Oncology at Queens University and Kingston General Hospital and Hotel Dieu Hospital, fully affiliated teaching hospitals. We are searching for an academic physician who is engaged in the practice of oncology Read more...

Dr. James J. Biagi appointed Acting Head, Department of Oncology

Published Mon Oct 18/10 10:00am.
James Biagi has been appointed Acting Head of Oncology at Queen's University, Hotel Dieu Hospital and Kingston General Hospital until December 31, 2010. These appointments are announced by Dr. Daniel Woolf, Principal of Queen's University, Mrs. Sherri McCullough, Chair of the Hotel Dieu Hospital Board of Directors, and Mr. Chris Cunningham, Chair of the Kingston General Hospital Board of Directors. Read more...

Dr. Annette H. McCallum appointed Head, Department of Diagnostic Radiology

Published Tue Sep 21/10 9:00pm.
Annette McCallum has been appointed Head of Diagnostic Radiology at Queens University, Hotel Dieu Hospital, Kingston General Hospital and Providence Care for an initial five-year term from July 1, 2010 to June 30, 2015. These appointments are announced by Daniel Woolf, Principal of Queens University, and Sherri McCullough, Chris Cunningham and Glen Wood, Chairs of the Boards of Directors for the respective Hospitals. Read more...

Dean On Campus

Published Mon Aug 16/10 7:00am.
I would like to dedicate this edition of Dean on Campus to a special colleague who has been a friend to all of us for the last 16 years. Paul Rosenbaum, Chief Operating Officer of the Southeastern Academic Medical Organization (SEAMO) has indicated to me his desire to retire Read more...

Dean (and Jake) On Campus

Published Tue Aug 03/10 7:00am.
Its been three weeks! We are settling in, have been to Chien Noir twice, Mia Gelato too many times, and have had only one complaint about our barking Portuguese Water Dog Jake. Read more...

Dr. Richard Reznick, Dean, Faculty of Health Sciences & Director School of Medicine

Published Mon Jul 12/10 3:00pm.

Dr. Reznick has been appointed to the position of Dean, Faculty of Health Sciences at Queens University and Chief Executive Officer of the Southeastern Ontario Academic Medical Organization (SEAMO). He is appointed full professor with tenure in the Department of Surgery. Read more...

Senate renews Centre for Studies in Primary Care

Published Thu Jun 03/10 12:00pm.
The Faculty of Health Sciences 10-year-old Centre for Studies in Primary Care has been renewed by the University Senate for an additional five years starting in July. Read more...

Three Queen's professors named Cancer Care Ontario research chairs

Published Tue Jun 01/10 2:00pm.
Michael Brundage (Oncology), Gabor Fichtinger (School of Computing) and Penelope Bradbury (Oncology) received three of the six chairs awarded, valued at a total of $2.5 million over five years. Read more...

School of Medicine merges Basic Sciences departments

Published Tue Jun 01/10 2:00pm.
University Senate has approved the merger of the School of Medicines five Basic Sciences departments into a new Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences. Read more...

Dr. Brian M. Bennett appointed Dean for Graduate and Postdoctoral Education

Published Mon May 10/10 3:00pm.
Principal Daniel Woolf and Dean David Walker are pleased to announce that Dr. Brian M. Bennett has been appointed Associate Dean for Graduate and Postdoctoral Education in the Faculty of Health Sciences for an initial term from May 1, 2010 to June 30, 2015. Read more...

Family medicine residency program expands to Durham Region

Published Thu Apr 29/10 11:00am.
Family Medicine residents from Queens School of Medicine and citizens of Oshawa and Durham region will benefit from the expansion of the universitys community-based residency program to the new... Read more

Military and Veteran Health Research Forum 2010 (Nov. 16-17)

Published Mon Apr 19/10 11:00am.
The Royal Military College of Canada and Queens University are pleased to host the first Canadian Military and Veteran Health Research Forum from November 16-17, 2010, at the Four Points Sheraton Hotel in Kingston, Ontario. This national forum will be an important gathering of health professionals and researchers interested in military and Veteran health research... Read more

School of Medicine submits document for University Academic Planning Process

Published Wed Apr 14/10 11:00am.
The Prinicpal's Academic Planning process has asked each Faculty to submit a document by April 15. The Schools of Medicine, Nursing and Rehabilitation Therapy have completed the first stage of this process on schedule... Read more

Queen's students rise to Challenge

Published Tue Mar 30/10 4:00pm.
A team of six Queen's University students won the inaugural Provincial Health Care Team Challenge at the National Health Sciences Students' Association conference in Hamilton two weeks ago... Read More

Conscientious Objection

Published Thu Mar 25/10 1:00pm.
Dr Ellen Tsai, will once again will be offering her presentation Conscientious Objection on Monday April 26, 2010 from 12:00pm - 1:00pm at the Gibson 1 classroom at St Mary's of the Lake... Admission is Free.

Queen's Health Sciences gets new Dean

Published Tue Mar 16/10 11:00am.
Richard Reznick is Queen's new Dean of Health Sciences and Director of the School of Medicine. His 5-year term commences July 1, 2010. He will be appointed full professor... Read More

Sarah A. Jones appointed Head, Department of Paediatrics

Published Tue Mar 09/10 10:00am.
Sarah Jones has been appointed as Head of Paediatrics at Queens University, Hotel Dieu Hospital and Kingston General Hospital for an initial term from March 1, 2010 to June 30, 2015. These appointments are announced by the Principal of Queens University and the Chairs of the Boards of Directors for Hotel Dieu Hospital and Kingston General Hospital. Read more...

Med students, faculty donate $2M to new building

Published Wed Jan 20/10 8:00am.

Queens medical students have pledged a half-million dollars to the universitys new school of medicine building.

At the annual general meeting of the Aesculapian Society last week, the students surprised Health Sciences Dean David Walker with two cheques one for $10,500 and another representing $500,000 that will be collected over the next several years through an optional $100 annual fee. Read more in the Campus News Centre.

Medical Miracles: Doctors, Saints, and Healing in the Modern World

Published Tue Nov 17/09 2:00pm.
If you missed the first two sittings because of the crowd, this repeat is being offered at the request of the Queen's medical class of 2013.

Dr. Jacalyn Duffin, Hannah Chair for the History of Medicine, Queen's University

Dr. Duffin's lecture will be based upon her book "Medical Miracles: Doctors, Saints, and Healing in the Modern World" which recently received the Jason A. Hannah Medal of the Royal Society of Canada. She will recount her research into stories of illness, prayer, and treatment in the Vatican Archives and Library, exploring how medicine and religion derive meaningful signs from particular instances of human distress. Dr. Duffin has examined Vatican sources on 1400 miracles from six continents and spanning four centuries.

The lecture will be held on Tuesday, November 24th, 2009 at 2:30 p.m. in Biosciences Building Room 1102.

Medical Miracles: Doctors, Saints, and Healing in the Modern World

Published Tue Oct 13/09 7:00pm.
The Museum of Health Care presents a public lecture by physician and historian Dr. Jacalyn Duffin, Hannah Chair for the History of Medicine, Queens University on Tuesday, November 3rd , 2009 at 7pm at Botterell Hall Room B139 (18 Stuart Street, Queen's University). 

The presentation in entitled  Medical Miracles: Doctors, Saints, and Healing in the Modern World will recount intimate stories of illness, prayer, and treatment a womans breast tumor melts away; a mans wounds knit exploring how medicine and religion derive meaningful signs from particular instances of human distress. Duffins examination of Vatican sources on 1400 miracles from six continents and spanning four centuries recently received the Jason A. Hannah Medal for an important publication in the history of medicine.

Admission is free and all are welcome. Refreshments will follow at the Museum of Health Care (32 George Street).

For more information, contact: Museum of Health Care, 613-548-2419, museum@kgh.kari.net or visit www.museumofhealthcare.ca.

Patient Safety Challenges and Opportunities

Published Thu Oct 08/09 2:00pm.
The Faculty of Health Sciences is pleased to welcome Philip Hassen, CEO of the Canadian Patient Safety Institute and President-elect of the International Society for Quality and Safety, to Queen's University on Monday, October 26th. Mr. Hassen will be providing a presentation on "Patient Safety Challenges and Opportunities" at 12:30 PM in Botterell Hall B147.  Everyone is welcome to attend this session to gain greater insight into Patient Safety and its importance.

New School of Medicine Building Groundbreaking

Published Thu Oct 01/09 10:00am.
The groundbreaking ceremony for the New School of Medicine Building will happen on Friday, October 23 at 11am at the corner of Arch St. & Stuart St. Everyone welcome. Click here to view the invitation.

Chronic pain treatments work better together, says Queen's anesthesiologist

Published Wed Sep 30/09 4:00pm.
People who suffer from debilitating neuropathic pain may get more relief and sleep better by combining two commonly-prescribed drugs.

A new, federally-funded study by Queen's University researchers has found that taking the drugs together is a more effective treatment than taking either of them individually. Read more...

Public lecture on the development of the electrocardiogram in recognition of World Heart Day

Published Thu Sep 24/09 9:00am.
The Museum of Health Care, in partnership with the Heart & Stroke Foundation of Ontario, presents the 13th annual Margaret Angus Research Fellowship Evening Presentation, to be held during the week of World Heart Day (27 September 2009).  

2009 Margaret Angus Research Fellow Leanne Shapton, a fourth-year Life Sciences student at Queens University, will present on the development of the electrocardiogram and its impact on cardiac patient care.

The presentation will be held on Thursday, October 1 at 7:00 p.m. at the Glaxo Wellcome Clinical Education Centre (Louise D. Acton Building, 31 George St., Queens University). Refreshments will follow at the Museum of Health Care (32 George St.). Admission is free and all are welcome.

For more information, please see http://www.museumofhealthcare.ca.

Health Research Roadmap: creating innovative research for better health and health care

Published Tue Sep 15/09 9:00am.
Dr. Kerry Rowe, Vice‐Principal (Research) at Queen's cordially invites you to a Public Dialogue entitled "Health Research Roadmap: creating innovative research for better health and health care" with special guest Dr. Alain Beaudet, President Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).

This event will take place on Friday, September 18, 2009 3:30 4:30 p.m in the Ban Righ Elspeth Fireside Room. Faculty, Post‐doctoral Fellows, Graduate, and Undergraduate Students welcome.

Dr. Helen Caldicott to present on nuclear power and climate change

Published Fri Sep 11/09 11:00am.
Dr. Helen Caldicott, Physician, Author, Educator and Activist, will be giving a talk entitled "Nuclear power is not the answer to climate change " Thursday, October 15th, 8:00pm at Etherington Auditorium. 

As the subject of the National Film Board of Canadas Oscar winning documentary If You Love This Planet, Dr. Helen Caldicott inspired a generation to work towards nuclear disarmament. Dr. Caldicott continues her mission with her most recent books Nuclear Power is Not the Answer and War in HeavenAs the world struggles with the nuclear question, Dr.  Caldicott will address the greatest, immediate threat to the planet with passion, vision and clarity.

This is event is sponsored by Physicians for Global Survival, The Sisters of Providence (JPIC office), The Community Coalition Against Mining Uranium,   Queens University Department of Pediatrics, OPIRG Queens University, Kingston Green Party, Kingston New Democratic Party.

Queen's Health and Human Rights Conference

Published Tue Sep 08/09 11:00am.
The Health and Human Rights Conference is an annual event coordinated by the students of the School of Medicine in collaboration with students from other departments at the university. Speakers from various faculties, professions and backgrounds share their unique perspectives on health and human rights and these themes are explored in the context of both global and local community issues, with the aim of illustrating our interconnectedness as global citizens.

The theme of this years conference is  "Creating the Space to Question" and it will take place on October 2nd (4pm-8pm) and October 3rd (9am-7pm) in the Biosciences building.

Please visit http://www.queenshhrc.ca to register and to find out more about this event.

John F. Rudan appointed Head, Department of Surgery

Published Thu Aug 27/09 5:00pm.
John Rudan has been appointed as Head of Surgery at Queens University, Hotel Dieu Hospital and Kingston General Hospital for an initial five-year term effective July 1, 2009. These appointments are announced by the Principal of Queens University and the Chairs of the Boards of Directors for Hotel Dieu Hospital and Kingston General Hospital. Read more...

Victor A. Tron appointed Head, Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine

Published Thu Aug 27/09 5:00pm.
Victor Tron has been appointed as Head of Pathology and Molecular Medicine at Queens University, Hotel Dieu Hospital and Kingston General Hospital for an initial five-year term effective July 1, 2009. These appointments are announced by the Principal of Queens University and the Chairs of the Boards of Directors for Hotel Dieu Hospital and Kingston General Hospital. Read more...

Dr. Patch Adams to visit Queen's in September

Published Thu Aug 20/09 11:30am.

The Queens University Aesculapian Medical Undergraduate Society invites you to a special presentation by Dr. Patch Adams (Yes, the REAL Patch Adams) - Medical doctor, clown, social advocate, and the subject of the Academy & Golden Globe Award-nominated film starring Robin Williams.

Dr. Patch Adams will give a presentation entitled "The Joy of Caring" on Thursday, September 10th, 2009 from 5:006:30 PM at the Biosciences Complex in Room 1101 (first floor).   His presentation is open to all members of the Faculty of Health Sciences and admission is free.

More information about the presentation can be found here (PDF).

Queen's doctor awarded Canadian Orthopaedic Association fellowship

Published Tue Aug 18/09 11:00am.
Dr. Ryan Bicknell has been named the North American Travelling Fellow of the year by the Canadian Orthpaedic Association. The prestigious fellowship is awarded to only one young surgeon in Canada each year. Dr. Bicknell specializes in elbow and shoulder reconstruction, arthroplasty, arthroscopy and sports injuries. Read more...

Queen's study aims at early diagnosis for ADHD and Parkinson's disease

Published Mon Jul 13/09 1:00pm.
Eye movement tests developed by Queen's University researchers to aid in understanding childhood brain development and healthy aging may also help in the diagnosis of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and detecting the early onset of Parkinson's disease. Read more...

Queen's health researchers receive $8 million

Published Mon Jul 06/09 1:30pm.
Researchers studying eye movement in brain function, urinary incontinence, malignant melanoma and chemotherapy for lung cancer are among 13 Queen's University projects receiving $8 million this year from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR). Read more...

Dr. Sherif El-Defrawy reappointed Head, Department of Opthalmology

Published Tue Jun 30/09 9:00am.
Sherif El-Defrawy has been reappointed as Head of the Department of Ophthalmology at Queens University, Hotel Dieu Hospital and Kingston General Hospital for a second five-year term commencing July 1, 2009. Read more...

Doctors should discuss end of life with terminal patients and families, says Queen's expert

Published Tue Jun 16/09 1:00pm.
Doctors treating people with advanced terminal diseases should openly discuss their patients' approaching death and help them make preparations with their families, says a Queen's University expert in end-of-life care. Read more...

Web site launched for new medical school building

Published Fri Jun 05/09 2:00pm.
A new web site has been developed to provide information on the progress of the new medical education building at Queens.  For more information, please visit http://meds.queensu.ca/building/.

Queen's and KGH receive $1.65M to help science grads move from lab to workforce

Published Fri Jun 05/09 11:00am.
The Human Mobility Research Centre (HMRC), a collaboration between Kingston General Hospital (KGH) and Queens University, has received $1.65 million to give graduates in the bone and joint health technologies program a head start in their careers. Read more...

Queen's celebrates funding for new medical school building

Published Tue Jun 02/09 9:00am.
It's now official: pre-construction work will begin shortly on a new home for Queen's medical school.

"The new medical school building will become the home base for our students, our classrooms and labs, which have been scattered in cramped and aged facilities across campus," said Dr. David Walker, Dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences. "The facility will include state of the art simulation labs, and expanded distance teaching programs so that we can continue providing an excellent education to students across southeastern Ontario."
Read more...

Dementia drugs may put some patients at risk, Queen's study shows

Published Mon Jun 01/09 3:00pm.
Side effects associated with several commonly-prescribed dementia drugs may be putting elderly Canadians at risk, says Queen's University Geriatrics professor Sudeep Gill. Read more...

Kingston doctors ride to support cancer research at Queen's

Published Mon Jun 01/09 3:00pm.
Queens cancer researchers are participating in Canada's largest annual motorcycle event dedicated to fighting prostate cancerthe Motorcycle Ride for Dad. Last years Ride for Dad in Kingston alone raised over $100,000 and funded five prostate cancer research projects at Queens. Read More...

Governments fund new home for Queen's medical school

Published Tue May 26/09 11:00am.
The federal and provincial governments have announced $58 million for a state-of-the-art building to house expanded teaching, research, administrative and student facilities, that are currently scattered in several buildings, some of which are a century old. Read more...

Dr. A. H. Boag appointed Acting Head, Dept. of Pathology and Molecular Medicine

Published Tue May 26/09 9:00am.
Tom Williams, Principal of Queens University, and Sherri McCullough and William Richard, Chairs of the Boards of Directors for Hotel Dieu and Kingston General Hospitals are pleased to announce that Alexander (Sandy) Boag has been appointed Acting Head of Pathology and Molecular Medicine at Queens University, Hotel Dieu Hospital and Kingston General Hospital until December 31, 2009. Read more...

3rd Annual Celebration of Teaching Day: Learning from Each Other

Published Wed May 20/09 11:00am.
The Office of Health Sciences Education invites you to the 3rd Annual Celebration of Teaching Day: Learning from Each Other on Friday June 12, 2009 from 8:15am to 1:30pm.  Please visit the web site to register and find out more information on the day.

Researchers receive $1.2 million from Canadian Cancer Society

Published Tue May 12/09 10:00am.
Three Queens researchers will receive more than $1.2 million in cancer research funding from the Canadian Cancer Society.  Read more...

Dr. Michael Adams appointed Acting Head, Dept. of Pharmacology & Toxicology

Published Wed May 06/09 1:00pm.
Principal Tom Williams is pleased to announce that Michael Adams has been appointed Acting Head of the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology for the period July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2010 while Thomas Massey is on administrative leave. Read more...

Queen's University Cardiovascular Conference 2009

Published Tue Apr 28/09 2:00pm.
Queen's University is proud to host the 2009 Queens Cardiovascular Conference on June 12 & 13.

This is a multidisciplinary international conference involving many of the best minds in cardiovascular science. For more information, please view the conference brochure.

Eye Specialist Wins Award For Excellence in Clinical Teaching

Published Wed Apr 22/09 2:00pm.
A Hotel Dieu Hospital eye specialist has been singled out from the medical teaching faculty at Queens University to receive a PAIRO Excellence in Clinical Teaching Award.

Dr. James Farmer, a comprehensive ophthalmologist who specializes in ocular pathology, has been honoured by the Professional Association of Interns and Residents of Ontario (PAIRO) as a remarkable clinical teacher who teaches and inspires Queens medical residents during their residency training.

Queen's Medical Student Golf Tournament website launched

Published Tue Apr 14/09 9:00am.
The official website for the Queen's Medical Student 6th annual golf tournament (Sept. 25th at Smuggler's Glen, Gananoque) has been launched. Please visit http://www.queensmedgolf.com

Anesthesiology wins provincial honours

Published Tue Apr 07/09 1:00pm.
The Department of Anesthesiology has been chosen as the recipient of the 2009 Professional Association of Interns and Residents of Ontario (PAIRO) Residency Program Excellence Award. Read more...

Inaugural Peter Morrin Memorial Lecture

Published Tue Mar 31/09 1:00pm.
You are cordially invited to the Inaugural Peter Morrin Memorial Lecture on Monday, April 6th, 2009 at 5 PM in Etherington Hall Auditorium. 

The Inaugural Peter Morrin Memorial Lecturer is Dr. Donal ODonoghue and he will be speaking on " Kidney Care: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow".  For more information, please see  http://meds.queensu.ca/cpd/che/morrin.

All are welcome. Refreshments will be provided.

Town Hall Meeting on Basic Sciences Restructuring Initiative

Published Mon Mar 30/09 9:00am.
The Faculty of Health Sciences will convene a Town Hall Meeting to launch the Basic Sciences restructuring initiative on Wednesday April 1, 2009 from 4:30 5:30 pm in the Biosciences Complex, Room 1101.

The purposes of the meeting are to explain the rationale for embarking on the restructuring initiative for the Basic Science Departments and to describe the systematic framework that will be used to guide the design process.

All faculty students and staff in the Faculty of Health Sciences are urged to attend.

Advisory Group for Restructuring Basic Medical Sciences

Published Mon Mar 16/09 2:00pm.
Dean David Walker has struck a Restructuring Advisory Group, the purpose of which is to recommend an optimal organizational structure for the Basic Sciences within the School of Medicine. Read more...

Faculty of Health Sciences Spring 2009 Newsletter

Published Wed Feb 25/09 8:00am.
The Spring 2009 Faculty of Health Sciences Newsletter from Dean David Walker is now available here for direct download as a PDF file.  Previous editions of the newsletter can be found here.

5th Annual NaHSSA Conference

Published Wed Feb 25/09 8:00am.
The National Health Sciences Interprofessional Student Conference, Career Fair, & Interprofessional Workshops provide an opportunity to learn and network with fellow students and health professionals from across the country.  The conference will run from March 21-22nd 2009 at the Holiday Inn & Queens University. For more information, please visit the conference website at www.nahssa.ca.

Long-term care facilities short on infection prevention, study shows

Published Fri Feb 20/09 1:30pm.
Infection prevention and control resources and programming in Canadian long-term care facilities fall short of recommended standards, a new Queens University study shows. Read more...

New study looks at outcomes for seniors admitted to Intensive Care

Published Wed Feb 18/09 12:00pm.
A new Queens University study will investigate the quality of life and survival of patients 80 years and older admitted to intensive care units across Canada. The first of its kind in Canada, this is the largest study ever undertaken on the subject.  Read more...

Medical student receives Rhodes Scholarship

Published Fri Feb 06/09 9:00am.
Second-year honours medical student Raed Joundi has been awarded a Rhodes Scholarship to study at Oxford University in England for three years starting this fall.  Read more...

Dean David Walker launches new Medical School Excellence Fund

Published Mon Jan 19/09 11:00am.
Dean David Walker is pleased to announce the establishment of the Medical School Excellence Fund. This new Fund will allow the School of Medicine to invest in emerging opportunities and student focused priorities. Read more...

Election Results for the Aesculapian Society 2009 Council

Published Mon Jan 19/09 10:00am.
The members of the Aesculapian Society Council for 2009 have been announced.  The newly elected members include Karmen Krol (AS President), Ken Collins (VP Internal), Payam Yazdan-Ashoori (VP Academic),  Chris Brown (VP External, Jr.),  Michael Surkont (Speaker), Alan Tam (Senator), John Doan & Raed Joundi (AMS Reps), Cary Fan (MEdTech Officer), Daniel Demsey (Treasurer), Jakub Sawicki (Student Initiatives Liaison), Jesleen Rana (Global Health Liaison, Jr.), Amy Glicksman (Social),  Elizabeth Miller (Women's Athletics), and Jon WM Lau (Men's Athletics).

Click here to view the full council list as well as contact information for each member.

Interprofessional Education and Patient Safety Forum & Workshops with Dr. Lorelei Lingard

Published Thu Jan 15/09 9:00am.
Dr. Lorelei Lingard from the University of Toronto will be visiting Queen's to speak about Interprofessional Communication and Patient Safety in a forum as well as two workshops.

FORUM #5: Interprofessional Education and Patient Safety
A presentation by Dr. Lingard with Q&A and group discussion to follow.
Tuesday, February 3, 2009
5:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Ban Righ Hall, Lower Dining Room

Workshop: Integrating IPE Communication into Pre & Post Licensure Education
Wednesday, February 4, 2009  
9:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
Bracken Library, eLearning Lab  (Room 128)

Patient Safety and Interprofessional Collaborative Practice
Wednesday, February 4, 2009
1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Kingston General Hospital, HMRC Conference Room (Room 6214)

Please RSVP to Forum and Workshops to office.ipep@queensu.ca by Wednesday, January 21, 2009

Dr. Iain D. Young appointed Vice-Dean Academic, Faculty of Health Sciences

Published Thu Jan 08/09 4:00pm.
Principal Tom Williams and Dean David Walker are pleased to announce that Dr. Iain Young has been appointed as Vice-Dean Academic in the Faculty of Health Sciences for an initial term from March 1, 2009 to June 30, 2014. Read more...

The Future of Medical Education at Queen's University

Published Tue Jan 06/09 11:00am.
The Medical Education Advisory Committee invites you to a special presentation by Dr. Nick Busing, President & CEO of The Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada, entitled "The Future of Medical Education at Queens University".  The presentation will be held on Thursday January 15th, 2009 from 4:30 to 6:00 p.m at the Biosciences Complex in Room 1102. More information can be found here.

Treatment for men's pelvic pain found ineffective

Published Fri Dec 19/08 11:00am.
A commonly prescribed drug for men suffering from a painful pelvic condition failed to significantly reduce patients' symptoms in an international study led by Queen's University professor and urologist at Kingston General Hospital, Curtis Nickel. Read More...

Pathology professor named first KGH Research Chair

Published Wed Dec 17/08 11:00am.
Queens Pathology and Molecular Medicine professor Jeremy Squire has been appointed Kingston General Hospitals first-ever Research Chair in Molecular Pathology. Read more...

New neurological network aims to be world leader

Published Thu Dec 04/08 11:00am.
Queens neuroscientists are joining forces with colleagues at York and Western universities to better understand how the brain works, especially in human movement control and perception, and how disease and injury can disrupt these functions. Read more...

Top medical student receives highest scholastic award

Published Mon Dec 01/08 11:00am.
The College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC) honoured Kate Morgan (Meds 09) as a recipient of the 2008 CFPC Medical Student Scholarship on Saturday, Nov. 29 at the CFPCs annual Family Medicine Forum held in Toronto. Read more...

Queen's neuroscientist wins national award for spinal research

Published Tue Nov 04/08 11:00am.
Queen's University professor of Physiology Ken Rose has been selected as the 2008 recipient of the prestigious Barbara Turnbull Award for research in the area of spinal cord injury - an affliction that affects millions of Canadians. Read more...

Pregnancy disorder signals need to screen for heart disease, study shows

Published Mon Nov 03/08 11:00am.
High blood pressure experienced during pregnancy could be a woman's earliest warning that she is at risk of developing heart disease - the number one killer of Canadian women - says Queen's University professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graeme Smith. Read more...

New School of Medicine Web Site

Published Thu Oct 23/08 9:00am.
The MEdTech Unit, in conjunction with Undergraduate and Postgraduate Medical Education, is pleased to announce the launch of our new School of Medicine website, which is now live at http://meds.queensu.ca. Along with a new look and feel you will notice that we have amalgamated a lot of previously scattered content, and joined the Undergrad and Postgrad websites under a single School of Medicine umbrella.

As a result of this re-organization the Faculty of Health Science web site has been moved to a new location, and is now available at http://healthsci.queensu.ca.

We are interested to know what you think about the new site. Please send any comments or suggestions to medtech@queensu.ca.

Queen's receives $4.7 million in new research funding

Published Thu Oct 02/08 12:00am.
Five Queen's University researchers have received $4.7 million in new funding from the federal and provincial governments. Read more...

New funding for Queen's health researchers

Published Wed Sep 24/08 12:00am.
Queen's University researchers involved in a dozen projects related to health technologies and pharmaceuticals have received more than $2.7 million in provincial funding. Read more...

Queen's oncologist to head national cancer research action group

Published Mon Sep 22/08 12:00am.
A renowned Queen's University cancer researcher is the new chair of the Research Action Group of the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer, and co-chair of the Canadian CancerRead more

Appointment and Reappointment Announcements

Published Fri Sep 05/08 12:00am.
Please follow the links below to read about recent appointments and reappointment of Department Heads: Appointment and Reappointment Listing

Queen's oncologist named one of first Cancer Care Ontario Research Chairs

Published Mon Jun 23/08 12:00am.
A Queen's University oncologist has received one of the first of seven Cancer Care Ontario Research Chairs announced today in Thunder Bay. Queen's cancer researcher and medical oncologist at Kingston General Hospital Christopher Booth will receive $500,000 over five years to help fund his research on patterns of care. Queen's News Centre

Queen's School of Medicine Magazine, Vol. 1, Number 1

Published Tue Jun 17/08 12:00am.
This inaugural publication of Queen's Medicine Magazine has been published by Queen's University to provide news and information about the School of Medicine to faculty, students, staff, alumni, friends and colleagues. Download a copy of the magazine here. (6.3 MB)

Educational Scholarship Survey Reminder

Published Mon Jun 09/08 12:00am.
Have you filled out the survey on Faculty Interest and Experience in Educational Scholarship? The Office of Health Sciences Education is in the process of identifying resources and strategies to support faculty engagement with educational scholarship as part of their career advancement. We are inviting all Health Sciences faculty to fill out a brief survey that was distributed via email. If you have not done so, please click on the link below and fill out the survey by Monday, June 16. Click Here to take survey

Celebration of Teaching Day - June 6th

Published Tue May 27/08 12:00am.
Have you registered yet for the June 6 Faculty of Health Sciences Celebration of Teaching Day? If not, please do so soon, as the numbers are limited and we are filling up quickly. You can join us for the full day or any session that might interest you. To register and see further details please go to http://meds.queensu.ca/celebrateteaching.

New Resource for Developing a Teaching Dossier Launched

Published Wed Apr 30/08 12:00am.
The Office of Health Sciences Education has created a web-based resource on teaching dossiers. At this site faculty can learn about dossiers, see examples of effective dossiers and actually create their own dossier. The section on how to assess a teaching dossier will be useful for promotion committee members and department heads.

Queen's medical students want more training in intellectual disabilities

Published Thu Apr 10/08 12:00am.
According to results from a recent Queens-led study, medical students want more training to help them treat people with intellectual disabilities. Queen's Press Release

Website launch

Published Tue Apr 01/08 12:00am.
The Office of Interprofessional Education and Practice website was launched today. The site is available by going to http://meds.queensu.ca/oipep/ or using the Quick Access List above.

Newsletter No. 21, April 2008

Published Tue Apr 01/08 12:00am.
The Faculty of Health Sciences Newsletter for April 2008 is now available for downloading here.

5th Annual School of Medicine Student Bursary Golf Tournament

Published Tue Apr 01/08 12:00am.
The 5th annual School of Medicine Student Bursary golf tournament will be held Friday, September 26th, 2008 (Homecoming Weekend) at Smuggler's Glen Golf Course in Gananoque. Download the Registration Form as a PDF HERE, or download it as a Word document HERE.

Queen's flags at half mast to remember John Basmajian

Published Thu Mar 20/08 12:00am.
Queens flags are at half mast in honour of Dr. John Basmajian, a distinguished physician and inventor of medical devices, who passed away March 18. Campus News

ITS Security Advisory

Published Tue Mar 18/08 12:00am.
ITS has posted an important security advisory on their website warning Queen's account holders not to respond to e-mail they receive asking you to confirm your e-mail identity. These are scam e-mails, and they are attempting to steal your account details. Please delete these messages and do not respond to them. Some known e-mail subjects are as follows: * ***verify YOUR Queensu EMAIL NOW*** * *****Under Maintainance***** For further information, please see the ITS notice: http://www.its.queensu.ca/internal/alerts/extviewalert.php?id=47dee82b620ed

Queen's research links stress and breast cancer

Published Sat Mar 08/08 12:00am.
Research findings from a Queen's University study have for the first time uncovered a possible biological link between severe psychological stress and an increased risk ofNEWSwire

Queen's scientist wins prestigious Killam Fellowship Award

Published Sat Feb 23/08 12:00am.
Queen's professor of Biochemistry and Physiology, Colin Funk is among 10 outstanding researchers to be named a new Killam Research Fellow for 2008. Queen's NEWSwire

New findings for breast cancer survivors

Published Fri Feb 15/08 12:00am.
New findings from a clinical trial coordinated at Queen's show that women who survive breast cancer - the most common form of cancer among Canadian women - are more likely to die...Queen's NEWSwire

Researcher aims to improve breast cancer treatment

Published Sat Jan 12/08 12:00am.
As one of the university's "young investigators" cancer researcher Waheed Sangrar is exploring new ways to improve current treatments for breast cancer. Full story