Meds Student Joe Gabriel Cycles Across Canada for Charity

On Saturday June 1, Meds 2015 student, Joe Gabriel, left Victoria, BC, at the beginning of a solo cross-country cycling tour. He’ll be biking across Canada to Halifax until August 20th. The tour will be fully self-supported; Joe will be carrying 35+ pounds of camping gear, tools and clothes along with him on his bike. Along the way, Joe is raising money for ten community charities, one in each province, with an overall fundraising goal of $10,000, or $1000 per charity. He will be chronicling his trip through his travel blog http://www.cyclingforcanada.org/. The site also has detailed descriptions for each charity, as well as a link to make a secure online donation. Every cent of every dollar raised will be split equally among each charity.

Joe says he’s doing the tour for a number of reasons. Not only do “I think it’ll give me one of the greatest and most memorable challenges of my life, both mentally and physically, but it gives me the opportunity to raise a significant amount of money for smaller charities that will hopefully be able to use it in ways that have a useful impact on local community members.”

joe gabriel 2
Joe dips his bike into the Pacific in Victoria, at Mile 0 BC

On June 4, Joe blogged that he’d received $1000.00 in charitable donations. Going to http://www.cyclingforcanada.org/ lets us help him make that impact on charities across Canada. Writing from a campground located on a trout farm near Hope, BC. Joe says, “I’m as pumped as my tires.” Have a great and donation-filled trip, Joe!

2 Responses to Meds Student Joe Gabriel Cycles Across Canada for Charity

  1. Pingback: Undergraduate School of Medicine Blog » Meds student Joe Gabriel completes his ride

Leave a Reply

Post Timeline

Is Leadership a Physician Competency?
Published Mon, March 2, 2015

Are physicians “leaders”? Put another way, is “leadership” a necessary or even desirable attribute of the aspiring or practicing medical doctor? The recent revision of the competency framework of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons, and specifically the proposal to change the “Manager” competency to “Leader” has sparked some interesting conversation on this issue. The root of this controversy … Continue reading

CARMS Match Day 2015: What our students are experiencing and how to help them get through it.
Published Mon, February 23, 2015

For medical students in Canada, there are three days in the course of their career that stand out above all others: the day they receive their letter of acceptance to medical school; convocation (when they officially become graduate physicians); and Match Day. The most emotionally charged by far, is Match Day. For those of you not familiar, Match Day is … Continue reading

Put your own oxygen mask on first: Helping medical students develop good self-care habits
Published Mon, February 23, 2015

By Janet Roloson, M.Ed., Chartered Psychologist When you are on an airplane, you may have noticed how the flight attendant instructs you to put your own oxygen mask on first before assisting others. This is important because if you run out of oxygen, you cannot help others with their oxygen masks – or with anything else. The same general principle … Continue reading

In Defense of the Lecture
Published Tue, February 17, 2015

Medical Grand Rounds are a longstanding (dare I say, traditional) feature of the academic medical centre.  In fact, their durability and continuing appeal might be considered somewhat perplexing in an age of increasing, almost frantic, busy-ness, and easy access to medical information and prepared presentations ready for review at our convenience.  Here at Queen’s, they have become rejuvenated and are … Continue reading

Happiness, Wonderment, and Career Choice
Published Mon, February 9, 2015

By J. Peter O’Neill, M.D., M.Div. During the first week of medical school, I introduce myself to the first year class, and proudly say that I am happy in my career and then I give my entire careers curriculum in one breath. I say: “You were selected to medical school because of outstanding individual academic performance and excelling in the … Continue reading