Meds Student Joe Gabriel Cycles Across Canada for Charity

On Saturday June 1, Meds 2015 student, Joe Gabriel, left Victoria, BC, at the beginning of a solo cross-country cycling tour. He’ll be biking across Canada to Halifax until August 20th. The tour will be fully self-supported; Joe will be carrying 35+ pounds of camping gear, tools and clothes along with him on his bike. Along the way, Joe is raising money for ten community charities, one in each province, with an overall fundraising goal of $10,000, or $1000 per charity. He will be chronicling his trip through his travel blog http://www.cyclingforcanada.org/. The site also has detailed descriptions for each charity, as well as a link to make a secure online donation. Every cent of every dollar raised will be split equally among each charity.

Joe says he’s doing the tour for a number of reasons. Not only do “I think it’ll give me one of the greatest and most memorable challenges of my life, both mentally and physically, but it gives me the opportunity to raise a significant amount of money for smaller charities that will hopefully be able to use it in ways that have a useful impact on local community members.”

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Joe dips his bike into the Pacific in Victoria, at Mile 0 BC

On June 4, Joe blogged that he’d received $1000.00 in charitable donations. Going to http://www.cyclingforcanada.org/ lets us help him make that impact on charities across Canada. Writing from a campground located on a trout farm near Hope, BC. Joe says, “I’m as pumped as my tires.” Have a great and donation-filled trip, Joe!

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