Revised Policy: Student Initiated Extracurricular Learning Activities

The Teaching and Learning Committee is requesting comments on revisions made to the  policy on Student Initiated Extracurricular Learning Activities.  A summary of the changes are listed below. The full revised policy may be viewed by clicking here.   Please submit all comments no later than March 8, 2013 by using the “Discussion” Comments: Policy on Student Initiated Extracurricular Activities

Student Initiated Extracurricular Learning Activities have been in place for many years.  A policy is needed only to ensure that these activities complement but do not supersede planned curricular activities and to direct those activities that become part of the “Dean’s Letter”. The last version of this policy, 2007, has received only a few changes:

  • A new definition and background statement have been added specifying that these activities must not impinge on curricular time.
  • The new Student Liaison position in the Aesculapian Society which offers substantial assistance to students, UGME Office and Teaching and Learning Committee, has been woven into the procedures.
  • The procedures have been separated from the policy.
  • The Teaching and Learning Committee now assumes responsibility for vetting and approving these activities as part of their mandate to oversee opportunities for independent and lifelong learning.
  • The students’ submission of attendance records only will trigger the entry into Dean’s Letter.

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