Bats, Blogs, and Story Ideas

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While I was drafting this post, I had an unexpected visitor in my office in the form of a juvenile bat. Yep. A bat.

I followed the Queen’s Environmental Health & Safety bat protocol (yes, there is one. Find it here) and exited the room immediately, closing the door. I then had a colleague call to arrange for its removal.

Ok, there may have been some squealing-like-a-five-year-old while I was exiting the room, but since there was nobody here to see that, I can deny it happened (colleagues’ vacations and meetings were well-timed for my dignity). There may also have been some vocabulary that would earn a fine for the curse jar at my house.

Just a handful of people would know about my bat adventure… except I’m writing about it here.

My point is this: things happen all the time around the UGME offices, the medical building, and other places of importance for the UG program. Things for, to, or by our faculty, staff, and students; interesting things that are worth sharing. I’m not suggesting that we’re starting a weekly newspaper filled with notations of every bat sighting, or intramural sports scores. What I do know, however, is there are plenty of newsworthy things happening that go unnoticed.

Things like: innovative student activities or projects; research publications; special events; noteworthy field trips; students or faculty winning awards. If you’ve ever wondered why we posted about “X” but not about “Y” the simple reason most of the time, is we likely didn’t know about “Y” at all.

You may have noticed a bit of a pattern to our blog posts. Our associate dean, Dr. Sanfilippo posts roughly every other week. On the alternating weeks, members of the Education Team post, with the occasional committee update thrown in. I post under my own name, as well as curating those posted under the “Guest Blogger” ID.

Here’s where you come in. If you’re a member of the Queen’s UGME community and you have an idea or suggestion for a blog post, please feel free to get in touch. We could write something up with you as the source, or you could write the post yourself as one of our Guest Bloggers.

If your suggestion is time-dependent (like an event or something with a deadline), try to get in touch as early as you can.

I can’t promise that we’ll be able to follow-up on every suggestion with a published post, but a great starting point is letting us know. So, get in touch. Reach me by email (theresa.suart@queensu.ca ) or drop into my office on the 3rd floor at 80 Barrie. It’s currently bat-free.


Bat shown is for illustration purposes only… no pictures of my recent temporary office guest are available. 

One Response to Bats, Blogs, and Story Ideas

  1. Gerald Evans says:

    This blog post reminded me a an incident many years ago with a former Queen’s medical student. Many years ago, this person was working with me as a clinical clerk on ID, when they picked up a dead bat found one morning in my clinic at KGH. When sent off for testing (since it had been handled without PPE), it was positive for rabies virus and the clerk then went on to need rabies immunization and RIG. I still hear from him now & then. Needless to say he decided to pursue FM as a career instead of ID, after that experience.

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