Why a picture is worth more than 1000 words

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Whether it’s the dreaded Service Ontario snap-shot that haunts us on our driver’s licence, or the passport photo that looks like we’ve been through a car wash, many of us despise the photo requirements public life tosses at us.

To these government-issued ID requirements, add the MEdTech Profile picture request. Please. Because we really need everyone to upload pictures to their profiles.

There are a lot of different reasons people don’t want to post a picture to their MEdTech profile – not the least of which is sometimes a nice picture of ourselves is hard to come by (mainly because we’re too hard on ourselves and, trust me, as someone who hasn’t lost the “baby weight” and the baby in question is 11 years old, I get the vanity argument.)

Why bother? There are two key reasons we need these photos: for proper faculty and preceptor identification during course evaluations; and to avoid email directory confusion.

  1. Course evaluation: Getting accurate feedback

Every faculty member who teaches four or more hours is evaluated by our students as part of our ongoing course and faculty review processes. This ensures appropriate feedback and contributes to overall quality of educational experiences as well as meets accreditation standards. Additionally, evaluation of clerkship preceptors is expanding to include multiple short-term supervisors. The challenge for our students is that by the end of a semester or rotation, they have dozens of faculty members they have had limited contact with and they’re faced with a list of names and forms to complete.

Marketing researchers have long valued the power of images. According to experts at 3M and Zabisco, 90 percent of information transmitted to the brain is visual, and the brain processes visuals thousands of times faster than text. Also, 65 percent of people are visual learners.

For visual learners, that picture memory-jogger is essential: What we’ve heard from students is, by the end of the semester, with so many different instructors, they’re really not sure who they’re evaluating and they’d like to provide appropriate feedback. If there’s a picture affiliated with your MEdTech profile, this helps sort out who’s who.

  1. Email confusion: Sending the right message to the right person

With a last name like “Suart”, I rarely run into email directory confusion, it’s more misspellings I worry about. However, if we also had a Theresa Stuart in UGME as either a student, staff or faculty member, you can bet there’d be some confusion. Or ask Matt Simpson – but which one? Matt Simpson, Manager of the Education Technology Unit, or Dr. Matt Simpson, Department of Family Medicine? (By the way, welcome to UGME, Dr. Simpson!). Again, photo identifiers can help resolve these types of issues.

Remember that MEdTech is a password-protected learning management system and is only accessible by our students, staff and affiliated faculty.

 

Adding your photo to your MEdTech profile is an easy two-step process: Get a picture and Upload it to MEdTEch.

Get a picture you can live with:

A well-cropped selfie from your iPhone, a snap-shot by a family member, or call me, and I’ll come to your office and take one.

Upload it to MEdTech:

(Click on any of these images to see a larger view of the screen shots)

From your dashboard MEdTech page, after logging in: in the upper right hand banner of the page, click on “My Profile” (if you haven’t uploaded a picture, you’ll have the silhouette icon) Screen shot 2015-07-06 at 1.44.28 PM

 

 

 

On your profile page, move your mouse arrow over the silhouette icon and select “Upload Photo” Screen shot 2015-07-06 at 1.45.46 PM

 

 

 

 

Select “Browse” (lower left hand of the pop-up) and select your photo file name), Click “Upload.”Screen shot 2015-07-06 at 1.52.37 PM

 

 

Voila! You’re done.

 

 

 

Thanks to all faculty and staff who have already uploaded their photos.

Questions or concerns, please feel free to email me at theresa.suart@queensu.ca — or find me in the MEdTech directory.

 

 

 

One Response to Why a picture is worth more than 1000 words

  1. Jonathan Cluett says:

    Thank you for posting this Theresa! Your summary of the student opinion is accurate. We want to provide detailed and constructive feedback to our instructors, but it is difficult to remember each of them by name. The MEdTech photo easily resolves this.

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