Resources

Post Thumbnail

By Mark Swartz, Copyright Specialist Understanding a few of the basic concepts behind Copyright law can help explain why some images can be used in certain situations and others cannot. The most useful concept to consider when thinking about how images can be used is balance. A Balancing Act In the landmark Supreme Court case Théberge v Galerie d’Art du … Continue reading

Post Thumbnail

By Theresa Suart & Eleni Katsoulas Amongst the plethora of student feedback we solicit about our courses, you may wonder why we sometimes add in focus groups. What could be added to the more than a dozen questions on course evaluation and faculty feedback surveys? The information we gather in student focus groups doesn’t replace the very valuable narrative feedback … Continue reading

Post Thumbnail

After bringing another busy semester to a close, UGME curricular leaders took time to reflect on the past year and take part in workshops and discussion groups on a number of areas of the curriculum at their semi-annual Curricular Leaders Retreat on June 19. The aim of the retreat was to share information and to generate ideas and solutions to … Continue reading

Post Thumbnail

Dr. Anthony Sanfilippo, Associate Dean of Undergraduate Medicine has announced that Susan Haley has joined the staff of the UGME Student Affairs office as a career advisor. She will be working with Kelly Howse and Renee Fitzpatrick in UGME’s growing Career Advising group. An anesthesiologist, Dr. Haley has practiced in Kingston for 16 years. Prior to moving to Kingston, she … Continue reading

Post Thumbnail

We often spend a lot of time planning our classes, especially our case-based small group learning (SGL) sessions. We tailor our sessional learning objectives to the course objectives that have been assigned, selected solid preparatory materials, build great cases and craft meaningful questions for groups to work through. This makes sense, as the small group learning (SGL) format used in … Continue reading

Post Thumbnail

By Suzanne Maranda, Head, Bracken Health Sciences Library When I meet faculty in person, especially if I’ve not seen them in a while, or if they are new to Queen’s, they often embarrassedly admit that they never come to the library. Over the years, I’ve refined my answer: ”Oh, but you do; you probably just don’t know it. Most links … Continue reading

Is it a problem, or just a shrewd investment? By the end of his or her medical education, the average Canadian graduate will owe $71,721. That amount, which has increased by about 7.3% over the past 5 years, may seem either huge or trivial depending on your perspective and stage of life. Interpretation might be enhanced with a few more … Continue reading

I recently had the opportunity to attend the DevLearn 2014 Conference.   The conference was about discovering tomorrow’s learning technologies, strategies and practices today and joining the community of industry pioneers that are exploring the new learning universe and are defining the future of training and development. I jam packed my days with amazing learning sessions that I thought we … Continue reading

Post Thumbnail

At the fall Curricular Leaders’ Retreat, Lynel Jackson highlighted four new and improved MEdTech features that can assist faculty in presenting information for students and in planning learning events and courses. Adding Resources to Learning Events The EdTech team has completely redesigned the way resources (such as files, links, and quizzes) are added to the Learning Events and displayed to … Continue reading

Post Thumbnail

Are all exam questions created equal? Not really—different type of questions test different levels of understanding. In the UGME program, we use a variety of exam questions to assess student learning—broadly classified as multiple-choice questions (MCQs) and short-answer questions (SAQs). But within these broad categories are a range of types of questions designed to test different levels of cognition. We … Continue reading

Post Timeline

When your objective is to write learning objectives…
Published Mon, January 16, 2017

Several times over the last few weeks, I’ve had conversations with course directors and instructors about writing learning objectives. Many people – from award-winning educators to rookies and everyone in between – find writing learning objectives a challenge. The typical advice of write out who will do what under what conditions is vague, so it’s often not very helpful. “General” … Continue reading

Our hospital and institutional problems are formidable, but not unprecedented: Finding lessons (and validation) in the past.
Published Sun, January 8, 2017

“The study of history is an antidote to the hubris of the present – the idea that everything we have, everything we do and everything we think is the ultimate, the best.” David McCullough   Mr. McCullough’s wise words can also serve as a reminder that the various challenges we find so troublesome today almost always have parallels in the … Continue reading

Blogging on Blogs
Published Mon, December 19, 2016

I was initially a reluctant blogger. Perhaps even skeptical. The advice and impetus to proceed came largely from our trusty MedTech folks, particularly Matt Simpson and Lynel Jackson, with encouragement from Jacqueline Findlay and other UG office staff. They felt it was the best option to address my request (they might term it whining) for a means to communicate on … Continue reading

After working so hard and achieving success, why are so many medical students depressed?
Published Sun, December 11, 2016

The first time David thought about becoming a doctor, he was 13 years old, in the eighth grade. He recalls that everyone thought it was a great idea. As a bright, naturally curious and diligent student with an outgoing personality, it seemed to his parents, teachers and friends a natural and entirely appropriate decision. All were supportive. In fact, they … Continue reading

Online modules can enhance curriculum content delivery
Published Mon, December 5, 2016

Do you want to build an eModule? Online modules, or eModules, are one of the content delivery methods available for use in our UGME curriculum. As with any content delivery method, the teacher’s job is to define objectives, then organize and deliver new content to students. Online modules can deliver content efficiently and creatively but they’re not without potential pitfalls, … Continue reading