Resources

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We often spend a lot of time planning our classes, especially our case-based small group learning (SGL) sessions. We tailor our sessional learning objectives to the course objectives that have been assigned, selected solid preparatory materials, build great cases and craft meaningful questions for groups to work through. This makes sense, as the small group learning (SGL) format used in … Continue reading

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By Suzanne Maranda, Head, Bracken Health Sciences Library When I meet faculty in person, especially if I’ve not seen them in a while, or if they are new to Queen’s, they often embarrassedly admit that they never come to the library. Over the years, I’ve refined my answer: ”Oh, but you do; you probably just don’t know it. Most links … Continue reading

Is it a problem, or just a shrewd investment? By the end of his or her medical education, the average Canadian graduate will owe $71,721. That amount, which has increased by about 7.3% over the past 5 years, may seem either huge or trivial depending on your perspective and stage of life. Interpretation might be enhanced with a few more … Continue reading

I recently had the opportunity to attend the DevLearn 2014 Conference.   The conference was about discovering tomorrow’s learning technologies, strategies and practices today and joining the community of industry pioneers that are exploring the new learning universe and are defining the future of training and development. I jam packed my days with amazing learning sessions that I thought we … Continue reading

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At the fall Curricular Leaders’ Retreat, Lynel Jackson highlighted four new and improved MEdTech features that can assist faculty in presenting information for students and in planning learning events and courses. Adding Resources to Learning Events The EdTech team has completely redesigned the way resources (such as files, links, and quizzes) are added to the Learning Events and displayed to … Continue reading

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Are all exam questions created equal? Not really—different type of questions test different levels of understanding. In the UGME program, we use a variety of exam questions to assess student learning—broadly classified as multiple-choice questions (MCQs) and short-answer questions (SAQs). But within these broad categories are a range of types of questions designed to test different levels of cognition. We … Continue reading

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Have you ever used brainstorming in your teaching? If you want groups of students to come up with a variety of ideas quickly, brainstorming is one tried-and-true way to get creative juices flowing. Since the concept was introduced in Alex Osborn’s 1953 Applied Imagination, brainstorming has caught on in business, education, volunteer organizations and elsewhere to generate ideas and solve … Continue reading

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Incorporating technology into teaching should focus on providing high-quality learning experiences for students, not just adding the latest tech fad to your teaching toolbox. That was one of the messages shared by Sidneyeve Matrix, PhD, keynote speaker at the 7th annual Celebration of Teaching, Learning and Scholarship in Health Sciences Education. Sponsored by the Office of Health Sciences Education, the … Continue reading

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Do you have an ever-growing “to-be-read” (TBR) pile of books and journals that you’ve told yourself all year you’ll get to “in the summer”? And now it’s summer and the pile is daunting and the beach is calling. What to do? Try these five steps to get started. Weeding the list (or culling the pile): If it’s been a while … Continue reading

Two former Queen’s medical students, Thomas R. Cawthorn, MD and Curtis Nickel, MD, of the recently graduated class of Meds 2013 conducted ultrasound education research during their time as students at Queen’s School of Medicine.   They worked with Dr. Michael O’Reilly, Dr. Henry Kafka, and Dr.  Amer M. Johri, of Queen’s and Dr. James W. Tam, of Winnipeg.  Their results have been … Continue reading

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Graduation traditions worth keeping – Permanent Class President and Convocation Speaker
Published Sun, March 29, 2015

In their final few weeks as students, graduating medical classes elect two of their peers for special recognitions. For many years, one member has been designated to represent them and take responsibility for ensuring that their identity as a family of friends and professional colleagues is maintained through the years to come. Being elected Permanent Class President is therefore an … Continue reading

Students are welcome here
Published Mon, March 23, 2015

“You seem to have students involved in everything!” (a recent visitor to Queen’s Undergraduate Medical Education) One of the very striking aspects of Queen’s UGME is the consistent presence of students in the life of the program and how it is run. Queen’s has the positive philosophy that students are an asset and indeed an absolute necessity for assistance in … Continue reading

Service-learning: Asking questions to learn what’s happening
Published Mon, March 23, 2015

As discussed in a previous blog post, formalizing opportunities for service-learning is increasingly important to schools of medicine, both for the inherent merits of service-learning itself (for both learners and communities), as well as for accreditation considerations. Queen’s UGME has been exploring ways to address service-learning more systematically, including appointing a Service Learning Advisory Panel. One of the interesting things … Continue reading

MD Program Executive Committee Meeting Highlights – March 19, 2015
Published Mon, March 23, 2015

Faculty and staff interested in attending MD PEC meetings, should contact the Committee Secretary (Faye Orser, (orserf@KGH.KARI.NET)) for information relating to agenda items and meeting schedules. UPDATE: Learning Environment Panel:  A panel, assembled to discuss concerns relating to instances of mistreatment of medical students, has released its report and recommendations.  The panel reports that “although Queen’s ranks favorably compared to … Continue reading

No crying in medical school?
Published Mon, March 16, 2015

The 1992 motion picture “A League of Their Own” features a very memorable scene that has been coming to mind in light of recent discussions. In it, Tom Hanks brilliantly portrays a crusty former major league baseball star who, in the early 1940s, has been conscripted to manage a team of young women participating in a league set up to … Continue reading