Education

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Critics only make you stronger. You have to look at what they are saying as feedback. Sometimes the feedback helps, and other times, it’s just noise that can be a distraction. Robert Kiyosaki   Separating the useful feedback from the noise in students’ comments on faculty evaluation questionnaires is an annual challenge for all university instructors– not just at Queen’s … Continue reading

Welcome to 2015!  I have a few resolutions for my teaching I’d like to share with you from some reading over the holiday.  Feel free to add yours too!  Resolution  1:  Be learner-centred. I’ve written about this before, but translating learner-centred theory into practical advice is very helpful. Education happens in the brain, and giving learners the opportunity to use … Continue reading

For a teenage boy growing up in a small town, the local auto mechanic can become a best friend and key to social success. I had great admiration for one in particular who would let me watch and explain what he was doing as he went about trying to resuscitate whatever antiquated pile of spare parts I was currently passing … Continue reading

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By Suzanne Maranda, Head, Bracken Health Sciences Library When I meet faculty in person, especially if I’ve not seen them in a while, or if they are new to Queen’s, they often embarrassedly admit that they never come to the library. Over the years, I’ve refined my answer: ”Oh, but you do; you probably just don’t know it. Most links … Continue reading

Is it a problem, or just a shrewd investment? By the end of his or her medical education, the average Canadian graduate will owe $71,721. That amount, which has increased by about 7.3% over the past 5 years, may seem either huge or trivial depending on your perspective and stage of life. Interpretation might be enhanced with a few more … Continue reading

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Beyond competencies – What should every Canadian medical graduate be able to do? Consider this: When you find yourself a passenger on an aircraft coming in for a tricky landing on a stormy night, would you be more comforted by the knowledge that your pilot is an expert in aeronautics and aircraft design, or that he/she has demonstrated the ability … Continue reading

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The word “education” has etymological roots that are both interesting and revealing. It evidently derives from the Latin “educo”, roughly translated “I lead forth” or “I raise up”. “Educatio” is “a breeding; a bringing up; a rearing”. The word “education” has been defined in various ways, but definition that I prefer is simpler and more consistent with the origin and … Continue reading

We’re thankful for our students! It’s Thanksgiving again, and an opportunity for us to express gratitude. This year, we have had the gift of several groups of students working with us in Undergraduate Medical Education and we’d like to showcase their efforts and publicly thank them for their help in making our program even better! Making DIL work! Beginning with … Continue reading

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Formalizing opportunities for service-learning is increasingly important to schools of medicine, both for the inherent merits of service-learning itself (for both learners and communities), as well as for accreditation considerations. The Future of Medical Education in Canada (FMEC) report places a strong emphasis on social accountability, and service-learning is integral to carrying out this mandate: “Central to these social accountability … Continue reading

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Have you ever used brainstorming in your teaching? If you want groups of students to come up with a variety of ideas quickly, brainstorming is one tried-and-true way to get creative juices flowing. Since the concept was introduced in Alex Osborn’s 1953 Applied Imagination, brainstorming has caught on in business, education, volunteer organizations and elsewhere to generate ideas and solve … Continue reading

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Are you up to the challenge?
Published Mon, January 26, 2015

Queen’s medical students have issued a challenge to the entire UGME community to change some habits in February with the #keepsmewell positive wellness challenge. Spearheaded by the Mental Health and Wellness committee, the challenge includes month-long goals such as eat balanced breakfasts and sleep 7 hours a night as well as weekly challenges that include such things as make a … Continue reading

Feedback requested on New or Updated Policies
Published Fri, January 23, 2015

Prior to a new or amended policy or regulation being submitted for final approval, it must be published for review and comment by faculty and/or students within the School of Medicine.  Feedback received will be directed to the Policy Sponsor. In the event that major changes are made based on this feedback, a new draft will be posted for additional comments. In keeping with … Continue reading

A Fragile Trust – Reflections on the Dalhousie Controversy
Published Mon, January 19, 2015

A patient reports to a hospital outpatient procedure unit early one morning for an electively planned, medically necessary surgical procedure. They divulge personal and sensitive information to a clerk. They disrobe at the request of a registered nurse. They allow a phlebotomist to start an intravenous line in their arm. They allow a resident physician to carry out a physical … Continue reading

Figuring out what’s important in a faculty evaluation report
Published Mon, January 12, 2015

Critics only make you stronger. You have to look at what they are saying as feedback. Sometimes the feedback helps, and other times, it’s just noise that can be a distraction. Robert Kiyosaki   Separating the useful feedback from the noise in students’ comments on faculty evaluation questionnaires is an annual challenge for all university instructors– not just at Queen’s … Continue reading

Educational Resolutions for the New Year
Published Mon, January 5, 2015

Welcome to 2015!  I have a few resolutions for my teaching I’d like to share with you from some reading over the holiday.  Feel free to add yours too!  Resolution  1:  Be learner-centred. I’ve written about this before, but translating learner-centred theory into practical advice is very helpful. Education happens in the brain, and giving learners the opportunity to use … Continue reading