Education

This week, I’ve invited one of our soon-to- be-graduating students, Elizabeth Clement (Meds 2016), to report on the LEAD (LEadership Enhancement and Development) program, an initiative she and a group of her colleagues have conceived and completed over the past year. When Liz, Alia Busuttil and Graydon Simmons first came to me with this idea, I must admit to thinking … Continue reading

Post Thumbnail

It’s been a busy four days at the Canadian Conference on Medical Education in Montreal – five or six days for those involved in business meetings and pre-conference workshops that started on Thursday. In addition to attending sessions, plenaries and business meetings, Queen’s contributors were lead authors, co-authors, supervisors, and collaborators with colleagues from other universities. We presented posters, led … Continue reading

Post Thumbnail

This weekend many involved in undergraduate medical education at Queen’s are heading to Montreal for the annual Canadian Conference on Medical Education (CCME). From faculty, to students, to administrative staff, we’re attending as presenters, workshop facilitators, and in several other roles. As described on its website, CCME is the largest annual gathering of medical educators in Canada. Attendees include Canadian … Continue reading

Post Thumbnail

By Theresa Suart & Eleni Katsoulas Writing and editing test questions is an ongoing challenge for most instructors. Creating solid multiple choice questions (MCQs) that adequately address learning objectives can be a time-consuming endeavor. Sometimes you may have existing questions that are pretty good, but not quite where you need them to be. Similar to a house reno versus new … Continue reading

Post Thumbnail

 by Meghan Bhatia, AS Wellness Officer and Monica Mullin, Nutritional Wellness Lead What is wellness? This is a question that proves far more complex than it would appear to be. Although on the surface it may seem easy to define, wellness is an interesting topic to discuss because it can be very personal and take different roles in students’ lives. … Continue reading

This weekend, I was digging around in my hard drive, and pulling files, as I’m working with Dr. Lindsay Davidson on the concept of integrated threads in our curriculum. (Stay tuned for a future blog.) All of a sudden, out popped a document called “3 key teaching principles,” which Dr. Elaine Van Melle and I worked on in 2008.  It … Continue reading

What our students are experiencing, and how to help them get through it For medical students in Canada, there are three days in the course of their career that stand out above all others: the day they receive their letter of acceptance to medical school; convocation (when they officially become graduate physicians); and Match Day. The most emotionally charged by … Continue reading

Imagine you’re responsible for planning a public health response to a virulent disease that is expected to kill 600 people. You have to choose between two management programs: If Program A is adopted, 200 people will be saved. If Program B is adopted, there is a one-third probability that all 600 people will be saved, and a two-thirds probability that … Continue reading

Recently Dr. Maurice Bernstein from The Keck School of Medicine, at University of Southern California, wrote into the listserve DR ED with this intriguing question: I find many first and second year medical students present their patient write-ups for their instructor’s review with errors both typographical but also errors in presentation that makes statements seriously ambiguous.  I tell my students … Continue reading

Post Thumbnail

Medical school applications are becoming big business, and a rather troubling expression of supply and demand economics. The “demand” side consists of the many thousands of young people in North America engaged in the highly competitive process of applying to the limited number of seats available at publicly subsidized Canadian and American schools. Rebecca Jozsa, our intrepid Admissions Officer and … Continue reading

Post Timeline

Canada’s Medical Schools collaboratively engaging the issue of Student Wellness.
Published Mon, May 30, 2016

For this week’s article, I’ve asked Renee Fitzpatrick, Director of Student Affairs, to write to us about a topic of critical importance. Indeed, the issue of student wellness and risk should be a major concern of both individuals and institutions engage in the education and development of young people. As she points out, our efforts in this regard need to … Continue reading

Finding hope amid the chaos: The baffling, reassuring, authentic appeal of Bernie Sanders
Published Mon, May 23, 2016

The ongoing and rather turbulent journey that is the American presidential election provides many opportunities to despair for the future of democratic institutions. However, a lone beacon for optimism arising from the whole spectacle may be the completely unanticipated appeal of one Mr. Bernie Sanders.   Mr. Sanders, the 75-year-old Brooklyn born son of Polish-Jewish immigrants and current junior senator … Continue reading

Reducing the Burden of Concussions Through Education
Published Mon, May 16, 2016

By Chris Griffiths The Concussion Education, Safety and Awareness Program (CESAP) seeks to reach a broad audience on the prevention, identification and management of concussion injuries. According to the Centre for Disease Control, 65% of all concussions occur in those aged 5-18, and concussions make up 13.2% of high school sports injuries (CDC, 2015). As high school populations are at … Continue reading

Teachers and Learners “Spring” Forward for Each Other
Published Mon, May 9, 2016

By Jonathan Krett, Aesculapian Society President, Meds’18 Recently I attended the Canadian Federation of Medical Students Spring General Meeting in Montreal, QC. Sitting around a table with medical student society presidents from across the country discussing a variety of issues really drove home that at Queen’s School of Medicine, we students have it pretty good. One of our strengths is … Continue reading

Celebrating Student LEADership
Published Mon, May 2, 2016

This week, I’ve invited one of our soon-to- be-graduating students, Elizabeth Clement (Meds 2016), to report on the LEAD (LEadership Enhancement and Development) program, an initiative she and a group of her colleagues have conceived and completed over the past year. When Liz, Alia Busuttil and Graydon Simmons first came to me with this idea, I must admit to thinking … Continue reading