Education

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The word “education” has etymological roots that are both interesting and revealing. It evidently derives from the Latin “educo”, roughly translated “I lead forth” or “I raise up”. “Educatio” is “a breeding; a bringing up; a rearing”. The word “education” has been defined in various ways, but definition that I prefer is simpler and more consistent with the origin and … Continue reading

We’re thankful for our students! It’s Thanksgiving again, and an opportunity for us to express gratitude. This year, we have had the gift of several groups of students working with us in Undergraduate Medical Education and we’d like to showcase their efforts and publicly thank them for their help in making our program even better! Making DIL work! Beginning with … Continue reading

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Formalizing opportunities for service-learning is increasingly important to schools of medicine, both for the inherent merits of service-learning itself (for both learners and communities), as well as for accreditation considerations. The Future of Medical Education in Canada (FMEC) report places a strong emphasis on social accountability, and service-learning is integral to carrying out this mandate: “Central to these social accountability … Continue reading

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Have you ever used brainstorming in your teaching? If you want groups of students to come up with a variety of ideas quickly, brainstorming is one tried-and-true way to get creative juices flowing. Since the concept was introduced in Alex Osborn’s 1953 Applied Imagination, brainstorming has caught on in business, education, volunteer organizations and elsewhere to generate ideas and solve … Continue reading

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Incorporating technology into teaching should focus on providing high-quality learning experiences for students, not just adding the latest tech fad to your teaching toolbox. That was one of the messages shared by Sidneyeve Matrix, PhD, keynote speaker at the 7th annual Celebration of Teaching, Learning and Scholarship in Health Sciences Education. Sponsored by the Office of Health Sciences Education, the … Continue reading

As part of your summer reading list, may I encourage you to look at Faculty Focus, higher ed teaching strategies from Magna Publications. Whenever Maryellen Weimer writes, I sit up and pay attention, but actually the other contributers have great ideas, and provide evidence for them too.  This is not just for medical education, but for all educators in general. … Continue reading

The following note was sent by one of our fourth year students to her community preceptor at the end of her Integrated Community Clerkship. Both parties have graciously agreed to allow me to share it with you. Dear Dr. McLean Thanks for: Teaching me Medicine Trusting me with your patients Introducing me to Perth Letting me be wrong Helping me … Continue reading

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Do you have an ever-growing “to-be-read” (TBR) pile of books and journals that you’ve told yourself all year you’ll get to “in the summer”? And now it’s summer and the pile is daunting and the beach is calling. What to do? Try these five steps to get started. Weeding the list (or culling the pile): If it’s been a while … Continue reading

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Sarah (fictitious name to protect the innocent) is a second year medical student attending my Cardiology clinic for an “observership”. Like her peers, Sarah had an outstanding academic career prior to entering medical school, as well as a variety of personal experiences that demonstrated an interest in the human condition and commitment to public service. Since entering medical school, she … Continue reading

How hard?  Not too hard…Ways to Integrate Science into the Clinical Courses (and vice versa) For this blog, I need your help. And also I’ve tried something new. First of all, I need help with some of the questions I’m positing. I’ve used questions used in activation of prior knowledge generally.  So please read them, and add your clinical know-how … Continue reading

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New Features on MEdTech
Published Mon, October 27, 2014

At the fall Curricular Leaders’ Retreat, Lynel Jackson highlighted four new and improved MEdTech features that can assist faculty in presenting information for students and in planning learning events and courses. Adding Resources to Learning Events The EdTech team has completely redesigned the way resources (such as files, links, and quizzes) are added to the Learning Events and displayed to … Continue reading

Engaging Diversity to “enlighten” Medical Education
Published Mon, October 20, 2014

The word “education” has etymological roots that are both interesting and revealing. It evidently derives from the Latin “educo”, roughly translated “I lead forth” or “I raise up”. “Educatio” is “a breeding; a bringing up; a rearing”. The word “education” has been defined in various ways, but definition that I prefer is simpler and more consistent with the origin and … Continue reading

We’re thankful for our students!
Published Mon, October 13, 2014

We’re thankful for our students! It’s Thanksgiving again, and an opportunity for us to express gratitude. This year, we have had the gift of several groups of students working with us in Undergraduate Medical Education and we’d like to showcase their efforts and publicly thank them for their help in making our program even better! Making DIL work! Beginning with … Continue reading

How to make “DIL” work for you
Published Mon, October 6, 2014

Best Practices in DIL: Directed Independent Learning Thanks to Dr. Lindsay Davidson, Director of UG Teaching, Learning and Innovation for writing this blog article. Have you ever wondered about the mysterious learning event type used in the undergraduate MD program known as a DIL? You may even have your name associated with such an event but be unsure what you’re … Continue reading

Everything you need to know about exam questions types in our curriculum!
Published Mon, September 29, 2014

Are all exam questions created equal? Not really—different type of questions test different levels of understanding. In the UGME program, we use a variety of exam questions to assess student learning—broadly classified as multiple-choice questions (MCQs) and short-answer questions (SAQs). But within these broad categories are a range of types of questions designed to test different levels of cognition. We … Continue reading