Education

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This first year I worked in a post-secondary setting, I was somewhat bemused when students asked me how I was going to spend my summer – they were heading out on a three or four month “break” and assumed I was doing the same. Some had work plans, some travel, some both. Regardless, they would be away from campus and … Continue reading

When I last wrote to you in March, I asked if you were a constructive or destructive problem-solver in groups.  We do a lot of small group (and larger group) learning in Queen’s UGME and I hoped to give a great framework to help prevent groups from imploding before or while constructive work could be done. We looked at identifying … Continue reading

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Queen’s UGME was well-represented in the oral and poster presentations at the recent Canadian Conference on Medical Education (CCME) held in Winnipeg, MB. Four oral presentations showcased UG work with another oral highlighting a teaching innovation in the QuARMS Program while a dozen posters featured Queen’s UG research and innovations featuring work by faculty, students, and staff. As explained on … Continue reading

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By Sallya Aleboyeh, MEDS 2019 A group of passionate and curious medical students chose to venture to Ottawa on the Family Day weekend this past February. Instead of visiting their families, they dove into history, with a group of equally-passionate curators and assistant legislators to Elizabeth May who also gave up time to give us private tours of: The Preservation … Continue reading

Here at Queen’s UGME, we use small group learning a great deal—from our prosections to PBL-based Facilitated Small Group Learning, to our TBL-based Small Group Learning. One very important aspect of group learning is preparing students to work successfully in teams. We do this in our first sessions in Orientation Week and in our new course, Introduction to Physician Roles. … Continue reading

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Several times over the last few weeks, I’ve had conversations with course directors and instructors about writing learning objectives. Many people – from award-winning educators to rookies and everyone in between – find writing learning objectives a challenge. The typical advice of write out who will do what under what conditions is vague, so it’s often not very helpful. “General” … Continue reading

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Do you want to build an eModule? Online modules, or eModules, are one of the content delivery methods available for use in our UGME curriculum. As with any content delivery method, the teacher’s job is to define objectives, then organize and deliver new content to students. Online modules can deliver content efficiently and creatively but they’re not without potential pitfalls, … Continue reading

Here’s a riddle for you: It may not be the type of writing you’re used to, and it requires thinking and reflection about an aspect of your work that you may not think as much about.  It has an intimidating word in the title and is the first hurdle in preparing an outline of your work.  What is it? Answer: … Continue reading

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The annual UGME Fall Education Retreat will be held December 6 with plenary and breakout sessions designed to help our faculty improve their teaching and assessment skills as well as to provide opportunities for networking and informal discussions. The retreat brings together course directors from pre-clerkship and clerkship, unit leads, intrinsic role leads, and administrative staff who support the program. … Continue reading

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My family and I recently relocated from a 2300-square-foot, five-bedroom house to an under-1100-square foot, three-bedroom townhouse to be closer to my son’s school and my office at Queen’s. This has required divesting ourselves of a great many belongings. Some things were easy (no more guest room = get rid of bedroom suite of furniture), but now we’re down to … Continue reading

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Five things to do this summer: a Med Ed to-do list
Published Mon, June 19, 2017

This first year I worked in a post-secondary setting, I was somewhat bemused when students asked me how I was going to spend my summer – they were heading out on a three or four month “break” and assumed I was doing the same. Some had work plans, some travel, some both. Regardless, they would be away from campus and … Continue reading

Doctors, patients, ritual and showing up
Published Mon, June 12, 2017

Ritual is a big part of life; this is especially evident at universities at this time of year. I recently took part in the ritual of attending convocation at another university to watch my daughter receive her Bachelor of Health Sciences degree. In addition to the parental joy of seeing my daughter on stage for about six seconds of hooding … Continue reading

Sorry to interrupt but I just had this great idea: How learning about and adapting communication styles can help move group learning forward
Published Mon, June 5, 2017

When I last wrote to you in March, I asked if you were a constructive or destructive problem-solver in groups.  We do a lot of small group (and larger group) learning in Queen’s UGME and I hoped to give a great framework to help prevent groups from imploding before or while constructive work could be done. We looked at identifying … Continue reading

Curriculum Committee Meeting Information – April 26, 2017
Published Wed, May 31, 2017

Faculty and staff interested in attending Curriculum Committee meetings should contact the Committee Secretary, Candace Miller (candace.miller@queensu.ca), for information relating to agenda items and meeting schedules. A meeting of the Curriculum Committee was held on April 26, 2017.  To review the topics discussed at this meeting, please click HERE to view the agenda. Faculty interested in reviewing the minutes of … Continue reading

Teaching Einstein
Published Sun, May 28, 2017

How would you like to have been young Albert Einstein’s teacher? Walter Isaacson’s excellent biography, “Einstein. His Life and Universe” provides some intriguing glimpses of the great physicist’s early education that should be of interest to anyone involved in teaching gifted and naturally curious young people. Popular myth holds that Albert Einstein was a poor student in early life. Apparently … Continue reading