Education

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Have you ever used brainstorming in your teaching? If you want groups of students to come up with a variety of ideas quickly, brainstorming is one tried-and-true way to get creative juices flowing. Since the concept was introduced in Alex Osborn’s 1953 Applied Imagination, brainstorming has caught on in business, education, volunteer organizations and elsewhere to generate ideas and solve … Continue reading

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Incorporating technology into teaching should focus on providing high-quality learning experiences for students, not just adding the latest tech fad to your teaching toolbox. That was one of the messages shared by Sidneyeve Matrix, PhD, keynote speaker at the 7th annual Celebration of Teaching, Learning and Scholarship in Health Sciences Education. Sponsored by the Office of Health Sciences Education, the … Continue reading

As part of your summer reading list, may I encourage you to look at Faculty Focus, higher ed teaching strategies from Magna Publications. Whenever Maryellen Weimer writes, I sit up and pay attention, but actually the other contributers have great ideas, and provide evidence for them too.  This is not just for medical education, but for all educators in general. … Continue reading

The following note was sent by one of our fourth year students to her community preceptor at the end of her Integrated Community Clerkship. Both parties have graciously agreed to allow me to share it with you. Dear Dr. McLean Thanks for: Teaching me Medicine Trusting me with your patients Introducing me to Perth Letting me be wrong Helping me … Continue reading

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Do you have an ever-growing “to-be-read” (TBR) pile of books and journals that you’ve told yourself all year you’ll get to “in the summer”? And now it’s summer and the pile is daunting and the beach is calling. What to do? Try these five steps to get started. Weeding the list (or culling the pile): If it’s been a while … Continue reading

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Sarah (fictitious name to protect the innocent) is a second year medical student attending my Cardiology clinic for an “observership”. Like her peers, Sarah had an outstanding academic career prior to entering medical school, as well as a variety of personal experiences that demonstrated an interest in the human condition and commitment to public service. Since entering medical school, she … Continue reading

How hard?  Not too hard…Ways to Integrate Science into the Clinical Courses (and vice versa) For this blog, I need your help. And also I’ve tried something new. First of all, I need help with some of the questions I’m positing. I’ve used questions used in activation of prior knowledge generally.  So please read them, and add your clinical know-how … Continue reading

An easy click to find your Faculty Evaluations Undergraduate Meds has been working with MEdTech on enhancing the way faculty receive their faculty evaluations from students. In MEdTech, go to “My Evaluations” at the top right hand side of the screen, and click.   All of your evaluations from the past years will be laid out for you there. Tips … Continue reading

Dear Meds 2014, Since this picture was taken in September 2010, you have successfully undertaken no fewer than 38 courses of study, as well as numerous projects, reflections, surveys, and various exercises intended to prepare you to be effective physicians.  In doing so, you have engaged and answered (usually correctly) several thousand individual questions of various types. I have one … Continue reading

Last week, a number of us from Queen’s School of Medicine were privileged to attend the Canadian Conference on Medical Education combined this year with the Ottawa Conference on assessment and evaluation, in Ottawa. It was a jam-packed schedule with great ideas from medical education, teaching, assessment, evaluation, interprofessional education, Undergraduate, Post-Graduate and Continuing Medical Education and much more.  There … Continue reading

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New MEdTech Central Release on October 1st
Published Tue, September 16, 2014

The Health Sciences Education Technology Unit has been busy working on a few new features that we are excited to bring to your attention on the Undergraduate Medicine Blog. These new features will be available in MEdTech Central as of October 1st at around 7:30AM after the upgrade takes place. 1. Adding Resources to Learning Events Admin > Manage Events … Continue reading

How will Curriculum Committee Decisions impact on your Queen’s UGME teaching? Read this post to find out!
Published Mon, September 15, 2014

In 2013-2014 the Queen’s UGME Curriculum Committee made the following decisions of general interest.  Please read to see if this will impact on your UGME teaching. (Note:  resource documents for the following are available in MEdTech Faculty Resources Community.) Change from “QMCCs” to MCCs In July 2013 the Curriculum Committee decided to adopt the list of MCC clinical presentations http://apps.mcc.ca/Objectives_Online/objectives.pl?loc=home&lang=english … Continue reading

The Educational Value of Diversity
Published Mon, September 8, 2014

In October of 1931, a 16-year-old college student joined a group of friends for a night of carousing and entertainment at the Driskill Hotel, in Austin Texas. He had no idea what to expect of the entertainment, the focus of the evening being on the “carousing” component. Rather unexpectedly, he is deeply moved by the performance, and particularly by the … Continue reading

Introducing Queen’s Meds 2018
Published Mon, September 1, 2014

With the all-too-soon end of summer comes the beginning of a new academic year. This week we welcome members of Meds 2018, the 160th class to enter the study of Medicine at Queen’s since our school opened its doors in 1854. A few facts about these new members of our learning community: They were selected from our largest ever applicant pool … Continue reading

Traffic under the Tuscan sun
Published Mon, August 25, 2014

Perhaps nowhere on earth do the ancient and modern come into such stark juxtaposition as on the narrow streets of a small Tuscan town. Pedestrians, pets, strollers, bicycles, walkers, wheelchairs, motorcycles, private cars, taxis, trucks, buses, ambulances and horses all share these cobbled laneways, apparently with equal access. There are no lane dividers (there being only one lane), no bicycle … Continue reading