Associate Dean

Imagine you’re responsible for planning a public health response to a virulent disease that is expected to kill 600 people. You have to choose between two management programs: If Program A is adopted, 200 people will be saved. If Program B is adopted, there is a one-third probability that all 600 people will be saved, and a two-thirds probability that … Continue reading

An “apprentice” is someone who works for a fully qualified individual for the purpose of learning a trade. Although the term has taken on a somewhat negative connotation of semi-indentured servitude, the word itself, interestingly, shares entomologic roots with French verb apprendre (to learn), and the Latin apprehendere (to “grasp” or understand). It would seem then that apprenticeships are intended … Continue reading

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Medical school applications are becoming big business, and a rather troubling expression of supply and demand economics. The “demand” side consists of the many thousands of young people in North America engaged in the highly competitive process of applying to the limited number of seats available at publicly subsidized Canadian and American schools. Rebecca Jozsa, our intrepid Admissions Officer and … Continue reading

“I always feel better after talking to the doctor.” The first time I recall hearing this statement, it was many years ago, spoken by an elderly lady emerging from the inner office of our family physician. I also recall it leaving me me a little confused, and a little intrigued. Dr. Mitchell practiced in Collingwood for many years and looked … Continue reading

Clement Clarke Moore (1779–1863) accomplished much during his lifetime. He was a Professor of Oriental and Greek Literature at the General Theological Seminary in New York City. His philanthropy led to the development of the section of New York City known at Chelsea. For many years, he served as a Board member for the New York Institution for the Blind.He … Continue reading

I will admit to being one of those people who went into the last election believing Justin Trudeau was “just not ready”. Too young. Too cocky. Too good looking. Just too perfect. Too dissimilar, I believed, from his famous father who I greatly admired and supported in the past. In fact, over forty years ago, I was quite an ardent … Continue reading

The past few months have seen a number of changes within the undergraduate program as people transition from and into key roles. I’d like to particularly acknowledge the contributions of Jennifer Carpenter, John Smythe, Peter O’Neill, Richard Thomas and Melinda Fleming. Jennifer has been providing incredibly valuable personal support to students for many years, often as the only counselor for … Continue reading

The need to provide supervised learning within the clinical setting has always been regarded as essential to the development of future physicians. Indeed, early versions of medical education consisted entirely of what could only be termed apprenticeships under the direction of a fully- qualified physician who was engaged by the student as the tutor, mentor and assessor. It was largely … Continue reading

Medical school accreditation has been described, with some justification, as the colonoscopy of medical education. The parallels are rather striking: Both require a long and distinctly uncomfortable period of preparation. Both require a public exposure of personal features most would prefer to keep modestly hidden. Both can get messy. Both carry high potential for embarrassment. In both cases, the procedure … Continue reading

Inspiration is one of those things we all intuitively understand, but defies clear definition. The best I’ve come across is “stimulation or arousal of the mind to special or unusual activity or creativity”. Sounds a little too clinical. Perhaps better capturing the spirit of inspiration are a couple of quotes from fairly famous folks who have more than a passing … Continue reading

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Curriculum Committee Information – September 28, 2017
Published Wed, November 15, 2017

Faculty and staff interested in attending Curriculum Committee meetings should contact the Committee Secretary, Candace Miller (umecc@queensu.ca), for information relating to agenda items and meeting schedules. A meeting of the Curriculum Committee was held on September 28, 2017.  To review the topics discussed at this meeting, please click HERE to view the agenda. Faculty interested in reviewing the minutes of the September … Continue reading

Grade Inflation – the “dirty little secret” of academia
Published Mon, November 13, 2017

“Would any of us have gotten into medical school today?” This was the tongue-in-cheek question I posed to my classmates at our medical school reunion last year. They were rather amused by it and, being very much aware of the high academic standards required by our current admissions processes, believed the answer was an obvious “no”. I tried to raise … Continue reading

Facebook thinks I’m a doctor…
Published Mon, November 6, 2017

  And other unusual things that happen when you’re an educational developer at a medical school It’s a unique and interesting thing being one of the non-medically-trained employees who work (mostly behind the scenes) to help run the undergraduate medical education program at Queen’s. On the one hand, friends and family can sometimes think I’ve magically completed medical school in … Continue reading

Nominations open for next Exceptional Healer Award
Published Mon, October 30, 2017

Instilling the values of patient-centered care is one of our goals in the UGME program. It’s also what the Kingston Health Sciences Centre Exceptional Healer Award recognizes in physicians from both the Hotel Dieu and KGH sites. Launched earlier this year, the Exceptional Healer Award is sponsored by the KHSC Patient & Family Advisory Council. It honours a physician who … Continue reading

Students striving to make a difference in our community
Published Mon, October 23, 2017

One of the attributes that our Admissions Committee works very hard to identify in applicants is a commitment to service. This has multiple dimensions, involving service to both individual patients and communities. It’s therefore always very gratifying to learn of efforts such as that described below in todays guest article provided by students Lauren Wilson, Katherine Rabicki and Melissa Lorenzo. … Continue reading