Associate Dean

Inspiration comes in various forms and at unexpected times.  For me, it came recently and quite unexpectedly during a brief getaway in Prince Edward Island with three great friends.  Although the trip was structured largely around golf (or a reasonable facsimile thereof), we took the opportunity one evening to attend a concert, the first in an annual series that’s known … Continue reading

For this week’s article, I’ve asked Renee Fitzpatrick, Director of Student Affairs, to write to us about a topic of critical importance. Indeed, the issue of student wellness and risk should be a major concern of both individuals and institutions engage in the education and development of young people. As she points out, our efforts in this regard need to … Continue reading

The ongoing and rather turbulent journey that is the American presidential election provides many opportunities to despair for the future of democratic institutions. However, a lone beacon for optimism arising from the whole spectacle may be the completely unanticipated appeal of one Mr. Bernie Sanders.   Mr. Sanders, the 75-year-old Brooklyn born son of Polish-Jewish immigrants and current junior senator … Continue reading

This week, I’ve invited one of our soon-to- be-graduating students, Elizabeth Clement (Meds 2016), to report on the LEAD (LEadership Enhancement and Development) program, an initiative she and a group of her colleagues have conceived and completed over the past year. When Liz, Alia Busuttil and Graydon Simmons first came to me with this idea, I must admit to thinking … Continue reading

The Masters Tournament is almost too perfect. The golf course itself is pristine and picturesque – every vista a postcard. The golfers are skilled, the spectators robotically well behaved, the commentators obsequious in their adulation of the players, the course, the “tradition”. Even the caddies are required to dress in the same white overalls, seemingly to blend in and not … Continue reading

This past month, a software program designed to play an ancient game called Go defeated Lee Sedol, a South Korean gentleman who is an 18 time world champion, widely acknowledged to be the leading human player of the game. The event didn’t attract much attention, probably because it was seen as a predictable, perhaps inevitable development. After all, computers have … Continue reading

Imagine it’s just before 8:30 on a Monday morning in the School of Medicine Building. The class is assembling for the first session of the day – a lecture to be delivered by a clinical faculty member who teaches perhaps 4-5 times each academic year. The session has been prepared based on objectives assigned by the Course Director. This material, … Continue reading

What our students are experiencing, and how to help them get through it For medical students in Canada, there are three days in the course of their career that stand out above all others: the day they receive their letter of acceptance to medical school; convocation (when they officially become graduate physicians); and Match Day. The most emotionally charged by … Continue reading

Imagine you’re responsible for planning a public health response to a virulent disease that is expected to kill 600 people. You have to choose between two management programs: If Program A is adopted, 200 people will be saved. If Program B is adopted, there is a one-third probability that all 600 people will be saved, and a two-thirds probability that … Continue reading

An “apprentice” is someone who works for a fully qualified individual for the purpose of learning a trade. Although the term has taken on a somewhat negative connotation of semi-indentured servitude, the word itself, interestingly, shares entomologic roots with French verb apprendre (to learn), and the Latin apprehendere (to “grasp” or understand). It would seem then that apprenticeships are intended … Continue reading

Post Timeline

Mentorship isn’t rocket science – or is it?
Published Mon, October 16, 2017

One of the most consequential communications in modern history took the form a letter sent by Albert Einstein to American President Franklin Roosevelt on August 2, 1939. “Sir: Some recent work by E. Fermi and L. Szilard, which has been communicated to me in manuscript, leads me to expect that the element uranium may be turned into a new and … Continue reading

Meet Jenna Healey, the new Hannah Chair in the History of Medicine
Published Mon, October 9, 2017

The new Jason A. Hannah Chair in the History of Medicine knows most Queen’s medical students aren’t going to memorize historical dates and events as a matter of routine, and that’s perfectly okay. Dr. Jenna Healey notes that instead focusing on dry facts – that these days can readily be looked up — one excellent use of history is “to … Continue reading

Curriculum Committee Information – July 27, 2017
Published Mon, October 2, 2017

Faculty and staff interested in attending Curriculum Committee meetings should contact the Committee Secretary, Candace Miller (umecc@queensu.ca), for information relating to agenda items and meeting schedules. A meeting of the Curriculum Committee was held on July 27, 2017.  To review the topics discussed at this meeting, please click HERE to view the agenda. Faculty interested in reviewing the minutes of the July … Continue reading

From campus to community: the Loving Spoonful Service Learning Project
Published Mon, October 2, 2017

By Steven Bae and Lauren Wilson, MEDS 2019 “Let food be thy medicine, and medicine be thy food” – Hippocrates Food. It is a vital part of our existence, and is a focal point in many cultures. Over the course of one year, a person who eats three meals a day consumes 1092 meals. It plays such a large role … Continue reading

The Meds 2019 Clinical Clerks hit the streets.
Published Mon, September 25, 2017

Here they come. This week, the class of Meds 2019 begin their Clinical Clerkship. Although this is only the half-way point in their medical education, it is a highly significant milestone, marking transition from a program dominated by largely classroom based knowledge and skills acquisition, to “real life” learning in a variety of clinical placements and elective experiences. Last Friday, … Continue reading