Associate Dean

“The study of history is an antidote to the hubris of the present – the idea that everything we have, everything we do and everything we think is the ultimate, the best.” David McCullough   Mr. McCullough’s wise words can also serve as a reminder that the various challenges we find so troublesome today almost always have parallels in the … Continue reading

I was initially a reluctant blogger. Perhaps even skeptical. The advice and impetus to proceed came largely from our trusty MedTech folks, particularly Matt Simpson and Lynel Jackson, with encouragement from Jacqueline Findlay and other UG office staff. They felt it was the best option to address my request (they might term it whining) for a means to communicate on … Continue reading

The first time David thought about becoming a doctor, he was 13 years old, in the eighth grade. He recalls that everyone thought it was a great idea. As a bright, naturally curious and diligent student with an outgoing personality, it seemed to his parents, teachers and friends a natural and entirely appropriate decision. All were supportive. In fact, they … Continue reading

A medical student and attending physician arrange to meet near a nursing station to discuss a recently admitted patient the student has reviewed. The patient has presented earlier that day to the emergency department with a severe headache and visual disturbance. The student relates a description of the symptoms, past history and physical findings, after which the attending asks:   … Continue reading

The Chicago Cubs have won the World Series. Let me say that again with appropriate emphasis – The CHICAGO CUBS have won the World Series! After 108 years of comfortable, predictable mediocrity, the lovable losers are now simply lovable. For anyone with even a passing interest in baseball, this is hard to fathom. There has been a disruption in the … Continue reading

“You don’t know what you got ‘til it’s gone” (from “Big Yellow Taxi” by Joni Mitchell) Joni Mitchell’s melancholy lyrics remind us of how easy it can be to take for granted those people around us who we get to know and who enrich our lives in so many ways. Even when we know that their remaining time with us … Continue reading

It’s two o’clock in the morning. The phone rings, waking the on-call attending physician from what had been a sound sleep. A resident is calling to review a case she has been asked to evaluate in the emergency department. She feels the patient has stabilized and can be sent home with arrangements for outpatient follow-up, but must “clear” that decision … Continue reading

“The People Who Make Organizations Go – or Stop” was the intriguing title of an article that appeared in the Harvard Business Review in 2002, authored by management experts Rob Cross and Laurence Prusak. In it, they describe the key people and largely informal networks that are necessary to the functioning of any organization, regardless of its purpose or product. … Continue reading

Apparently we have a Doctor crisis. Certainly that’s the impression one would gain from articles, columns and letters commenting on the recent impasse between the government and doctors of Ontario. It’s also the impression that many medical students have been left with after the decisive defeat this summer of the draft Physician Service Agreement developed and endorsed by the Ministry … Continue reading

September brings a crisp freshness in the morning air and, with it, anticipation for the beginning of a new academic year. In the university environment, it also brings renewal and the excitement that goes with welcoming a new group of students to our schools. This week we welcome members of Meds 2020, the 162nd class to enter the study of Medicine … Continue reading

Post Timeline

When your objective is to write learning objectives…
Published Mon, January 16, 2017

Several times over the last few weeks, I’ve had conversations with course directors and instructors about writing learning objectives. Many people – from award-winning educators to rookies and everyone in between – find writing learning objectives a challenge. The typical advice of write out who will do what under what conditions is vague, so it’s often not very helpful. “General” … Continue reading

Our hospital and institutional problems are formidable, but not unprecedented: Finding lessons (and validation) in the past.
Published Sun, January 8, 2017

“The study of history is an antidote to the hubris of the present – the idea that everything we have, everything we do and everything we think is the ultimate, the best.” David McCullough   Mr. McCullough’s wise words can also serve as a reminder that the various challenges we find so troublesome today almost always have parallels in the … Continue reading

Blogging on Blogs
Published Mon, December 19, 2016

I was initially a reluctant blogger. Perhaps even skeptical. The advice and impetus to proceed came largely from our trusty MedTech folks, particularly Matt Simpson and Lynel Jackson, with encouragement from Jacqueline Findlay and other UG office staff. They felt it was the best option to address my request (they might term it whining) for a means to communicate on … Continue reading

After working so hard and achieving success, why are so many medical students depressed?
Published Sun, December 11, 2016

The first time David thought about becoming a doctor, he was 13 years old, in the eighth grade. He recalls that everyone thought it was a great idea. As a bright, naturally curious and diligent student with an outgoing personality, it seemed to his parents, teachers and friends a natural and entirely appropriate decision. All were supportive. In fact, they … Continue reading

Online modules can enhance curriculum content delivery
Published Mon, December 5, 2016

Do you want to build an eModule? Online modules, or eModules, are one of the content delivery methods available for use in our UGME curriculum. As with any content delivery method, the teacher’s job is to define objectives, then organize and deliver new content to students. Online modules can deliver content efficiently and creatively but they’re not without potential pitfalls, … Continue reading