Associate Dean

An “apprentice” is someone who works for a fully qualified individual for the purpose of learning a trade. Although the term has taken on a somewhat negative connotation of semi-indentured servitude, the word itself, interestingly, shares entomologic roots with French verb apprendre (to learn), and the Latin apprehendere (to “grasp” or understand). It would seem then that apprenticeships are intended … Continue reading

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Medical school applications are becoming big business, and a rather troubling expression of supply and demand economics. The “demand” side consists of the many thousands of young people in North America engaged in the highly competitive process of applying to the limited number of seats available at publicly subsidized Canadian and American schools. Rebecca Jozsa, our intrepid Admissions Officer and … Continue reading

“I always feel better after talking to the doctor.” The first time I recall hearing this statement, it was many years ago, spoken by an elderly lady emerging from the inner office of our family physician. I also recall it leaving me me a little confused, and a little intrigued. Dr. Mitchell practiced in Collingwood for many years and looked … Continue reading

Clement Clarke Moore (1779–1863) accomplished much during his lifetime. He was a Professor of Oriental and Greek Literature at the General Theological Seminary in New York City. His philanthropy led to the development of the section of New York City known at Chelsea. For many years, he served as a Board member for the New York Institution for the Blind.He … Continue reading

I will admit to being one of those people who went into the last election believing Justin Trudeau was “just not ready”. Too young. Too cocky. Too good looking. Just too perfect. Too dissimilar, I believed, from his famous father who I greatly admired and supported in the past. In fact, over forty years ago, I was quite an ardent … Continue reading

The past few months have seen a number of changes within the undergraduate program as people transition from and into key roles. I’d like to particularly acknowledge the contributions of Jennifer Carpenter, John Smythe, Peter O’Neill, Richard Thomas and Melinda Fleming. Jennifer has been providing incredibly valuable personal support to students for many years, often as the only counselor for … Continue reading

The need to provide supervised learning within the clinical setting has always been regarded as essential to the development of future physicians. Indeed, early versions of medical education consisted entirely of what could only be termed apprenticeships under the direction of a fully- qualified physician who was engaged by the student as the tutor, mentor and assessor. It was largely … Continue reading

Medical school accreditation has been described, with some justification, as the colonoscopy of medical education. The parallels are rather striking: Both require a long and distinctly uncomfortable period of preparation. Both require a public exposure of personal features most would prefer to keep modestly hidden. Both can get messy. Both carry high potential for embarrassment. In both cases, the procedure … Continue reading

Inspiration is one of those things we all intuitively understand, but defies clear definition. The best I’ve come across is “stimulation or arousal of the mind to special or unusual activity or creativity”. Sounds a little too clinical. Perhaps better capturing the spirit of inspiration are a couple of quotes from fairly famous folks who have more than a passing … Continue reading

This week, the class of Meds 2017 begins their Clinical Clerkship. This is a highly significant milestone in their medical education, representing not only the half-way point, but also a transition from a program dominated by knowledge and skills acquisition carried out in classrooms and simulation settings, to “real life” learning in a variety of clinical placements and elective experiences. … Continue reading

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7th Annual QHIP Speaker Series underway
Published Tue, February 9, 2016

The 7th Annual Queen’s Health Interprofessionals (QHIP) Speaker Series launched last week, but there’s still time for students to register for the remaining workshops. Each workshop takes place on Mondays from 6:30 – 8 p.m in Room 132 at the Medical Building. The series is free, but you need to register to attend. (Here’s the form: http://goo.gl/forms/xgH2k2ao2U). Those who attend … Continue reading

Is “Apprenticeship” Dead? The case for clinical service in medical education
Published Mon, February 8, 2016

An “apprentice” is someone who works for a fully qualified individual for the purpose of learning a trade. Although the term has taken on a somewhat negative connotation of semi-indentured servitude, the word itself, interestingly, shares entomologic roots with French verb apprendre (to learn), and the Latin apprehendere (to “grasp” or understand). It would seem then that apprenticeships are intended … Continue reading

“When the patient fainted, her eyes rolled around the room”: How to make medical charting clear and accurate.
Published Mon, February 1, 2016

Recently Dr. Maurice Bernstein from The Keck School of Medicine, at University of Southern California, wrote into the listserve DR ED with this intriguing question: I find many first and second year medical students present their patient write-ups for their instructor’s review with errors both typographical but also errors in presentation that makes statements seriously ambiguous.  I tell my students … Continue reading

The Troublesome Ethics of Entrepreneurship in Medical School Admissions
Published Mon, January 25, 2016

Medical school applications are becoming big business, and a rather troubling expression of supply and demand economics. The “demand” side consists of the many thousands of young people in North America engaged in the highly competitive process of applying to the limited number of seats available at publicly subsidized Canadian and American schools. Rebecca Jozsa, our intrepid Admissions Officer and … Continue reading

Socrates, questioning and you
Published Mon, January 18, 2016

Socrates, Questioning and You: Revisiting the question of questioning Happy 2016 all! Are you thinking about some educational resolutions? How about reflecting on how you question medical students, especially in a clinical setting? When we last spoke in December, the topic was Socrates, “pimping” and teaching in medical education (http://meds.queensu.ca/blog/undergraduate/?p=2575). I ended by saying I’d be back to talk about … Continue reading