Associate Dean

When I first met Malcolm Williams, he was trying valiantly to teach me how to examine the back of a child’s throat without getting bitten or having the patient throw up on my white shirt and tie. He was only partially successful. Over the years, I’ve gotten to know Malcolm well, in various contexts. Such continuing and evolving relationships are … Continue reading

This past week’s Democratic National Convention provided many dramatic moments and stirring oratory from prominent national figures. For me, the most poignant and powerful presentation came not from a famous personality or polished public speaker, but from Mr. Khizir Khan.   Mr. Khan is not a politician and far from a famous national figure. Born in Pakistan, he immigrated to … Continue reading

Anyone who has grocery shopped at a large supermarket recently will notice that you’re now confronted with a decision at check-out time. You can line up as usual to have a clerk check and bag your items, or you can opt to go to the do-it-yourself kiosk, where you have the privilege of scanning and packing your items yourself. I’ve … Continue reading

The image below is taken from one of the many graduation photographs hanging on the walls of the School of Medicine Building. The young men in the photo are members of the 1884 graduating class. On the surface, one may be struck by the obvious differences to our current world, in terms of gender and ethnic diversity, medical knowledge, and … Continue reading

Inspiration comes in various forms and at unexpected times.  For me, it came recently and quite unexpectedly during a brief getaway in Prince Edward Island with three great friends.  Although the trip was structured largely around golf (or a reasonable facsimile thereof), we took the opportunity one evening to attend a concert, the first in an annual series that’s known … Continue reading

For this week’s article, I’ve asked Renee Fitzpatrick, Director of Student Affairs, to write to us about a topic of critical importance. Indeed, the issue of student wellness and risk should be a major concern of both individuals and institutions engage in the education and development of young people. As she points out, our efforts in this regard need to … Continue reading

The ongoing and rather turbulent journey that is the American presidential election provides many opportunities to despair for the future of democratic institutions. However, a lone beacon for optimism arising from the whole spectacle may be the completely unanticipated appeal of one Mr. Bernie Sanders.   Mr. Sanders, the 75-year-old Brooklyn born son of Polish-Jewish immigrants and current junior senator … Continue reading

This week, I’ve invited one of our soon-to- be-graduating students, Elizabeth Clement (Meds 2016), to report on the LEAD (LEadership Enhancement and Development) program, an initiative she and a group of her colleagues have conceived and completed over the past year. When Liz, Alia Busuttil and Graydon Simmons first came to me with this idea, I must admit to thinking … Continue reading

The Masters Tournament is almost too perfect. The golf course itself is pristine and picturesque – every vista a postcard. The golfers are skilled, the spectators robotically well behaved, the commentators obsequious in their adulation of the players, the course, the “tradition”. Even the caddies are required to dress in the same white overalls, seemingly to blend in and not … Continue reading

This past month, a software program designed to play an ancient game called Go defeated Lee Sedol, a South Korean gentleman who is an 18 time world champion, widely acknowledged to be the leading human player of the game. The event didn’t attract much attention, probably because it was seen as a predictable, perhaps inevitable development. After all, computers have … Continue reading

Post Timeline

Reflections on reflection on reflection
Published Mon, August 22, 2016

Hi all:  I’m back from a few weeks at our family cottage near Sudbury. Now for those of you from north of Parry Sound, you know that it’s not a cottage, it’s a camp, but I’m translating for all the Southerners here at the UGME blog. I find that there’s nothing like total exhaustion from installing a new water pump, … Continue reading

Curriculum Committee Meeting Information – July 21, 2016
Published Mon, August 22, 2016

Faculty and staff interested in attending Curriculum Committee meetings should contact the Committee Secretary, Candace Miller at candace.miller@queensu.ca for information relating to agenda items and meeting schedules. A meeting of the Curriculum Committee was held on July 21, 2016.  To review the topics discussed at this meeting, please click HERE to view the agenda. Faculty interested in reviewing the minutes … Continue reading

Malcolm’s Italian Adventure, and the art of teaching through storytelling.
Published Mon, August 15, 2016

When I first met Malcolm Williams, he was trying valiantly to teach me how to examine the back of a child’s throat without getting bitten or having the patient throw up on my white shirt and tie. He was only partially successful. Over the years, I’ve gotten to know Malcolm well, in various contexts. Such continuing and evolving relationships are … Continue reading

Tartan, threads, and an integrated curriculum
Published Mon, August 8, 2016

By Lindsay Davidson Director, Teaching, Learning and Integration Summer is a funny time – for some, relaxing with family on the dock, for others seeking out new adventures. I’ve been amused as I’ve watched from a distance, as my university-age son embraces his Scottish roots by running in “kilt runs” in Perth and Quebec City. This exploration of his ancestors’ … Continue reading

“Have you even read the United States constitution”
Published Mon, August 1, 2016

This past week’s Democratic National Convention provided many dramatic moments and stirring oratory from prominent national figures. For me, the most poignant and powerful presentation came not from a famous personality or polished public speaker, but from Mr. Khizir Khan.   Mr. Khan is not a politician and far from a famous national figure. Born in Pakistan, he immigrated to … Continue reading