Associate Dean

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In October of 1931, a 16-year-old college student joined a group of friends for a night of carousing and entertainment at the Driskill Hotel, in Austin Texas. He had no idea what to expect of the entertainment, the focus of the evening being on the “carousing” component. Rather unexpectedly, he is deeply moved by the performance, and particularly by the … Continue reading

With the all-too-soon end of summer comes the beginning of a new academic year. This week we welcome members of Meds 2018, the 160th class to enter the study of Medicine at Queen’s since our school opened its doors in 1854. A few facts about these new members of our learning community: They were selected from our largest ever applicant pool … Continue reading

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Perhaps nowhere on earth do the ancient and modern come into such stark juxtaposition as on the narrow streets of a small Tuscan town. Pedestrians, pets, strollers, bicycles, walkers, wheelchairs, motorcycles, private cars, taxis, trucks, buses, ambulances and horses all share these cobbled laneways, apparently with equal access. There are no lane dividers (there being only one lane), no bicycle … Continue reading

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Should Medical Schools be looking for it? Should Medical Schools be teaching it? What do professional sports teams, executive search firms and medical school admissions committees have in common? (This is not a trick question). Answer: they are searching for young people with the quality of resilience. This particular quality may go by many names, both formal and colloquial: grit, … Continue reading

In the course of my career, I’ve unfortunately had many occasions to deliver “bad news” to patients and their families. This usually involves making them aware that treatments are either not working or no curative options are available, and that the end is imminent. In these moments, reactions are personal, individual and usually unpredictable. No matter how much one rationally … Continue reading

The following note was sent by one of our fourth year students to her community preceptor at the end of her Integrated Community Clerkship. Both parties have graciously agreed to allow me to share it with you. Dear Dr. McLean Thanks for: Teaching me Medicine Trusting me with your patients Introducing me to Perth Letting me be wrong Helping me … Continue reading

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Sarah (fictitious name to protect the innocent) is a second year medical student attending my Cardiology clinic for an “observership”. Like her peers, Sarah had an outstanding academic career prior to entering medical school, as well as a variety of personal experiences that demonstrated an interest in the human condition and commitment to public service. Since entering medical school, she … Continue reading

At last month’s Convocation, we celebrated the beginning of 102 new medical careers. As the new graduates walked across the stage of Grant Hall, they stepped from their shared four-year undergraduate experience, into a diversity of career paths. Twenty-six will begin training programs in Family Medicine. Fourteen have chosen Internal Medicine. Eleven are entering Anaesthesia. Six in Pediatrics. Six in … Continue reading

Each year, our graduating class is asked to nominate a member to speak on their behalf at the Convocation ceremony. Last week, Yan Sim delivered an address on behalf of the Meds 2014 class. Yan’s heartfelt remarks certainly seemed to capture the sentiments of his colleagues and resonated with everyone in Grant Hall that afternoon.   It seemed clear that his … Continue reading

Dear Meds 2014, Since this picture was taken in September 2010, you have successfully undertaken no fewer than 38 courses of study, as well as numerous projects, reflections, surveys, and various exercises intended to prepare you to be effective physicians.  In doing so, you have engaged and answered (usually correctly) several thousand individual questions of various types. I have one … Continue reading

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New MEdTech Central Release on October 1st
Published Tue, September 16, 2014

The Health Sciences Education Technology Unit has been busy working on a few new features that we are excited to bring to your attention on the Undergraduate Medicine Blog. These new features will be available in MEdTech Central as of October 1st at around 7:30AM after the upgrade takes place. 1. Adding Resources to Learning Events Admin > Manage Events … Continue reading

How will Curriculum Committee Decisions impact on your Queen’s UGME teaching? Read this post to find out!
Published Mon, September 15, 2014

In 2013-2014 the Queen’s UGME Curriculum Committee made the following decisions of general interest.  Please read to see if this will impact on your UGME teaching. (Note:  resource documents for the following are available in MEdTech Faculty Resources Community.) Change from “QMCCs” to MCCs In July 2013 the Curriculum Committee decided to adopt the list of MCC clinical presentations http://apps.mcc.ca/Objectives_Online/objectives.pl?loc=home&lang=english … Continue reading

The Educational Value of Diversity
Published Mon, September 8, 2014

In October of 1931, a 16-year-old college student joined a group of friends for a night of carousing and entertainment at the Driskill Hotel, in Austin Texas. He had no idea what to expect of the entertainment, the focus of the evening being on the “carousing” component. Rather unexpectedly, he is deeply moved by the performance, and particularly by the … Continue reading

Introducing Queen’s Meds 2018
Published Mon, September 1, 2014

With the all-too-soon end of summer comes the beginning of a new academic year. This week we welcome members of Meds 2018, the 160th class to enter the study of Medicine at Queen’s since our school opened its doors in 1854. A few facts about these new members of our learning community: They were selected from our largest ever applicant pool … Continue reading

Traffic under the Tuscan sun
Published Mon, August 25, 2014

Perhaps nowhere on earth do the ancient and modern come into such stark juxtaposition as on the narrow streets of a small Tuscan town. Pedestrians, pets, strollers, bicycles, walkers, wheelchairs, motorcycles, private cars, taxis, trucks, buses, ambulances and horses all share these cobbled laneways, apparently with equal access. There are no lane dividers (there being only one lane), no bicycle … Continue reading