Associate Dean

We all need people in our lives who are willing to tell us “how it is”. These are special folks, often spouses, relatives or lifelong friends, whose relationship with us is strong enough to allow candid, honest, unvarnished commentary about topics close to the heart. I found myself in a conversation with one such person recently who had the temerity … Continue reading

“One hundred and eighty-five”. That was the answer to my question. The question, that I’d posed somewhat naively to our intrepid assessment coordinator, Amanda Consack, was “how many assessments have the 2015 class undertaken during medical school?” “Do you mean everything?” she asked. “Yes. Everything”, I answered, not wanting to sound wimpy. In her typical fashion, Amanda provided me not … Continue reading

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The first accreditation visit to the Queen’s School of Medicine occurred in October of 1909, and didn’t go particularly well. The reviewer was Abraham Flexner, a rather determined iconoclast and career educator who had been commissioned by the Carnegie Foundation to carry out a review of all North American medical schools. Flexner undertook his charge with a shrewd earnestness that … Continue reading

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In their final few weeks as students, graduating medical classes elect two of their peers for special recognitions. For many years, one member has been designated to represent them and take responsibility for ensuring that their identity as a family of friends and professional colleagues is maintained through the years to come. Being elected Permanent Class President is therefore an … Continue reading

The 1992 motion picture “A League of Their Own” features a very memorable scene that has been coming to mind in light of recent discussions. In it, Tom Hanks brilliantly portrays a crusty former major league baseball star who, in the early 1940s, has been conscripted to manage a team of young women participating in a league set up to … Continue reading

Are physicians “leaders”? Put another way, is “leadership” a necessary or even desirable attribute of the aspiring or practicing medical doctor? The recent revision of the competency framework of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons, and specifically the proposal to change the “Manager” competency to “Leader” has sparked some interesting conversation on this issue. The root of this controversy … Continue reading

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For medical students in Canada, there are three days in the course of their career that stand out above all others: the day they receive their letter of acceptance to medical school; convocation (when they officially become graduate physicians); and Match Day. The most emotionally charged by far, is Match Day. For those of you not familiar, Match Day is … Continue reading

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Medical Grand Rounds are a longstanding (dare I say, traditional) feature of the academic medical centre.  In fact, their durability and continuing appeal might be considered somewhat perplexing in an age of increasing, almost frantic, busy-ness, and easy access to medical information and prepared presentations ready for review at our convenience.  Here at Queen’s, they have become rejuvenated and are … Continue reading

We all need role models. These are people who guide us through our lives by helping us understand the type of people we aspire to become. They may do so by providing wisdom or advice, but mostly they guide by the example of the lives they live. They are precious to us, and particularly so for those aspiring to a … Continue reading

A patient reports to a hospital outpatient procedure unit early one morning for an electively planned, medically necessary surgical procedure. They divulge personal and sensitive information to a clerk. They disrobe at the request of a registered nurse. They allow a phlebotomist to start an intravenous line in their arm. They allow a resident physician to carry out a physical … Continue reading

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What’s the price of professional autonomy?
Are we willing to pay it?
Published Mon, May 25, 2015

We all need people in our lives who are willing to tell us “how it is”. These are special folks, often spouses, relatives or lifelong friends, whose relationship with us is strong enough to allow candid, honest, unvarnished commentary about topics close to the heart. I found myself in a conversation with one such person recently who had the temerity … Continue reading

When you are yourself, I’m free to be myself
Published Mon, May 18, 2015

“When you are yourself, I’m free to be myself” The Reverend Bill Hendry spoke these words as a “first patient” at the First Patient Program’s 3rd annual Grand Finale on Wed. May 13. He was addressing the 100 students of the class of 2017 who had completed their 18 plus months of relationship with their first patient, whom they’d met … Continue reading

Milestones: A tribute to our tenacious 2015 graduating class.
Published Mon, May 11, 2015

“One hundred and eighty-five”. That was the answer to my question. The question, that I’d posed somewhat naively to our intrepid assessment coordinator, Amanda Consack, was “how many assessments have the 2015 class undertaken during medical school?” “Do you mean everything?” she asked. “Yes. Everything”, I answered, not wanting to sound wimpy. In her typical fashion, Amanda provided me not … Continue reading

Student attention in class: Whose responsibility?
Published Mon, May 4, 2015

I just received a posting from Faculty Focus with the engaging title:  Why can’t students just pay attention?  Dr. Chris Hakala, the author, gives a really good overview of the dilemma many of us face when teaching:  students are not engaged, are multi-tasking at best, and distracted at worst, and are not learning or retaining key concepts.  How much responsibility … Continue reading

Queen’s student wins 2015 Sandra Banner Award for Leadership
Published Tue, April 28, 2015

Queen’s Class of 2015 student Eve Purdy received the CaRMS Sandra Banner Award for Student Leadership at the CaRMS forum held in conjunction with the Canadian Conference on Medical Education (CCME) in Vancouver on April 26. Richard Reznick, Dean of the Queen’s Faculty of Health Sciences, presented the award on behalf of the award selection committee. “Eve has always challenged … Continue reading