Curricular

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By Michelle Gibson Why Use Videos in Geriatric Medicine Teaching? I teach first year medical students about the awesome world of geriatric medicine. I am a family medicine-Care of the Elderly trained doctor who loves her work, and although I am dutifully teaching about all the sacred geriatric syndromes (falls, confusion, frailty, etc.), my main motivation is to help (very) … Continue reading

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It’s February, and despite the recent Family Day holiday, we’re still stuck in the depths of winter. Things are just a little harder to get excited about when it’s bleak, cold and snowy. Add in the task of teaching something that’s become routine, and the doldrums can be nearly certain to set in. It can be a challenge for experts … Continue reading

The 7th Annual Queen’s Health Interprofessionals (QHIP) Speaker Series launched last week, but there’s still time for students to register for the remaining workshops. Each workshop takes place on Mondays from 6:30 – 8 p.m in Room 132 at the Medical Building. The series is free, but you need to register to attend. (Here’s the form: http://goo.gl/forms/xgH2k2ao2U). Those who attend … Continue reading

An “apprentice” is someone who works for a fully qualified individual for the purpose of learning a trade. Although the term has taken on a somewhat negative connotation of semi-indentured servitude, the word itself, interestingly, shares entomologic roots with French verb apprendre (to learn), and the Latin apprehendere (to “grasp” or understand). It would seem then that apprenticeships are intended … Continue reading

Recently Dr. Maurice Bernstein from The Keck School of Medicine, at University of Southern California, wrote into the listserve DR ED with this intriguing question: I find many first and second year medical students present their patient write-ups for their instructor’s review with errors both typographical but also errors in presentation that makes statements seriously ambiguous.  I tell my students … Continue reading

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Medical school applications are becoming big business, and a rather troubling expression of supply and demand economics. The “demand” side consists of the many thousands of young people in North America engaged in the highly competitive process of applying to the limited number of seats available at publicly subsidized Canadian and American schools. Rebecca Jozsa, our intrepid Admissions Officer and … Continue reading

Socrates, Questioning and You: Revisiting the question of questioning Happy 2016 all! Are you thinking about some educational resolutions? How about reflecting on how you question medical students, especially in a clinical setting? When we last spoke in December, the topic was Socrates, “pimping” and teaching in medical education (http://meds.queensu.ca/blog/undergraduate/?p=2575). I ended by saying I’d be back to talk about … Continue reading

“I always feel better after talking to the doctor.” The first time I recall hearing this statement, it was many years ago, spoken by an elderly lady emerging from the inner office of our family physician. I also recall it leaving me me a little confused, and a little intrigued. Dr. Mitchell practiced in Collingwood for many years and looked … Continue reading

Faculty and staff interested in attending MD PEC meetings, should contact the Committee Secretary (Faye Orser, (orserf@KGH.KARI.NET)) for information relating to agenda items and meeting schedules. School of Medicine Building – Flood Repairs Dr. Sanfilippo was happy to announce that the repairs to the building are wrapping up and classes will resume in the lower lecture theatre as of January … Continue reading

Recently, one of the words in the title of an article in Academic Medicine really caught my eye: “Socrates Was Not a Pimp:  Changing the Paradigm of Questioning” by Dr. Amanda Kost and Dr. Frederick M. Chen. (Kost & Chen, 2015) Of course, the word that caught my eye was “Socrates,” he of sitting with students under an olive tree … Continue reading

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Mentorship isn’t rocket science – or is it?
Published Mon, October 16, 2017

One of the most consequential communications in modern history took the form a letter sent by Albert Einstein to American President Franklin Roosevelt on August 2, 1939. “Sir: Some recent work by E. Fermi and L. Szilard, which has been communicated to me in manuscript, leads me to expect that the element uranium may be turned into a new and … Continue reading

Meet Jenna Healey, the new Hannah Chair in the History of Medicine
Published Mon, October 9, 2017

The new Jason A. Hannah Chair in the History of Medicine knows most Queen’s medical students aren’t going to memorize historical dates and events as a matter of routine, and that’s perfectly okay. Dr. Jenna Healey notes that instead focusing on dry facts – that these days can readily be looked up — one excellent use of history is “to … Continue reading

Curriculum Committee Information – July 27, 2017
Published Mon, October 2, 2017

Faculty and staff interested in attending Curriculum Committee meetings should contact the Committee Secretary, Candace Miller (umecc@queensu.ca), for information relating to agenda items and meeting schedules. A meeting of the Curriculum Committee was held on July 27, 2017.  To review the topics discussed at this meeting, please click HERE to view the agenda. Faculty interested in reviewing the minutes of the July … Continue reading

From campus to community: the Loving Spoonful Service Learning Project
Published Mon, October 2, 2017

By Steven Bae and Lauren Wilson, MEDS 2019 “Let food be thy medicine, and medicine be thy food” – Hippocrates Food. It is a vital part of our existence, and is a focal point in many cultures. Over the course of one year, a person who eats three meals a day consumes 1092 meals. It plays such a large role … Continue reading

The Meds 2019 Clinical Clerks hit the streets.
Published Mon, September 25, 2017

Here they come. This week, the class of Meds 2019 begin their Clinical Clerkship. Although this is only the half-way point in their medical education, it is a highly significant milestone, marking transition from a program dominated by largely classroom based knowledge and skills acquisition, to “real life” learning in a variety of clinical placements and elective experiences. Last Friday, … Continue reading