Curricular

This weekend, I was digging around in my hard drive, and pulling files, as I’m working with Dr. Lindsay Davidson on the concept of integrated threads in our curriculum. (Stay tuned for a future blog.) All of a sudden, out popped a document called “3 key teaching principles,” which Dr. Elaine Van Melle and I worked on in 2008.  It … Continue reading

What our students are experiencing, and how to help them get through it For medical students in Canada, there are three days in the course of their career that stand out above all others: the day they receive their letter of acceptance to medical school; convocation (when they officially become graduate physicians); and Match Day. The most emotionally charged by … Continue reading

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By Michelle Gibson Why Use Videos in Geriatric Medicine Teaching? I teach first year medical students about the awesome world of geriatric medicine. I am a family medicine-Care of the Elderly trained doctor who loves her work, and although I am dutifully teaching about all the sacred geriatric syndromes (falls, confusion, frailty, etc.), my main motivation is to help (very) … Continue reading

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It’s February, and despite the recent Family Day holiday, we’re still stuck in the depths of winter. Things are just a little harder to get excited about when it’s bleak, cold and snowy. Add in the task of teaching something that’s become routine, and the doldrums can be nearly certain to set in. It can be a challenge for experts … Continue reading

The 7th Annual Queen’s Health Interprofessionals (QHIP) Speaker Series launched last week, but there’s still time for students to register for the remaining workshops. Each workshop takes place on Mondays from 6:30 – 8 p.m in Room 132 at the Medical Building. The series is free, but you need to register to attend. (Here’s the form: http://goo.gl/forms/xgH2k2ao2U). Those who attend … Continue reading

An “apprentice” is someone who works for a fully qualified individual for the purpose of learning a trade. Although the term has taken on a somewhat negative connotation of semi-indentured servitude, the word itself, interestingly, shares entomologic roots with French verb apprendre (to learn), and the Latin apprehendere (to “grasp” or understand). It would seem then that apprenticeships are intended … Continue reading

Recently Dr. Maurice Bernstein from The Keck School of Medicine, at University of Southern California, wrote into the listserve DR ED with this intriguing question: I find many first and second year medical students present their patient write-ups for their instructor’s review with errors both typographical but also errors in presentation that makes statements seriously ambiguous.  I tell my students … Continue reading

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Medical school applications are becoming big business, and a rather troubling expression of supply and demand economics. The “demand” side consists of the many thousands of young people in North America engaged in the highly competitive process of applying to the limited number of seats available at publicly subsidized Canadian and American schools. Rebecca Jozsa, our intrepid Admissions Officer and … Continue reading

Socrates, Questioning and You: Revisiting the question of questioning Happy 2016 all! Are you thinking about some educational resolutions? How about reflecting on how you question medical students, especially in a clinical setting? When we last spoke in December, the topic was Socrates, “pimping” and teaching in medical education (http://meds.queensu.ca/blog/undergraduate/?p=2575). I ended by saying I’d be back to talk about … Continue reading

“I always feel better after talking to the doctor.” The first time I recall hearing this statement, it was many years ago, spoken by an elderly lady emerging from the inner office of our family physician. I also recall it leaving me me a little confused, and a little intrigued. Dr. Mitchell practiced in Collingwood for many years and looked … Continue reading

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Jordan Spieth’s painful pursuit of perfection, green jackets, and learning from failure.
Published Mon, April 25, 2016

The Masters Tournament is almost too perfect. The golf course itself is pristine and picturesque – every vista a postcard. The golfers are skilled, the spectators robotically well behaved, the commentators obsequious in their adulation of the players, the course, the “tradition”. Even the caddies are required to dress in the same white overalls, seemingly to blend in and not … Continue reading

CCME 2016: We came, we saw, we presented!
Published Mon, April 18, 2016

It’s been a busy four days at the Canadian Conference on Medical Education in Montreal – five or six days for those involved in business meetings and pre-conference workshops that started on Thursday. In addition to attending sessions, plenaries and business meetings, Queen’s contributors were lead authors, co-authors, supervisors, and collaborators with colleagues from other universities. We presented posters, led … Continue reading

Five great reasons to attend medical education conferences
Published Mon, April 11, 2016

This weekend many involved in undergraduate medical education at Queen’s are heading to Montreal for the annual Canadian Conference on Medical Education (CCME). From faculty, to students, to administrative staff, we’re attending as presenters, workshop facilitators, and in several other roles. As described on its website, CCME is the largest annual gathering of medical educators in Canada. Attendees include Canadian … Continue reading

Artificial Intelligence? Artificial Doctors?
Published Mon, April 4, 2016

This past month, a software program designed to play an ancient game called Go defeated Lee Sedol, a South Korean gentleman who is an 18 time world champion, widely acknowledged to be the leading human player of the game. The event didn’t attract much attention, probably because it was seen as a predictable, perhaps inevitable development. After all, computers have … Continue reading

Improving existing MCQs
Published Mon, March 28, 2016

By Theresa Suart & Eleni Katsoulas Writing and editing test questions is an ongoing challenge for most instructors. Creating solid multiple choice questions (MCQs) that adequately address learning objectives can be a time-consuming endeavor. Sometimes you may have existing questions that are pretty good, but not quite where you need them to be. Similar to a house reno versus new … Continue reading