Curricular

How hard is this?  Not too hard.  Here are some ways to integrate science into the clinical courses (and vice versa) Hi all:  I’m recycling a recent post, having drastically reduced it.  I hope to write more about examples of integration and integrators from our curriculum in the future. You may think you don’t use basic science knowledge anymore.  Think … Continue reading

How hard?  Not too hard…Ways to Integrate Science into the Clinical Courses (and vice versa) For this blog, I need your help. And also I’ve tried something new. First of all, I need help with some of the questions I’m positing. I’ve used questions used in activation of prior knowledge generally.  So please read them, and add your clinical know-how … Continue reading

Our UG curriculum has been built to accept the MCC clinical presentations as the core or spine for our Medical Expert role and competencies. What are they? MCC clinical presentations are part of the learning objectives for the MCC Exams, under the “Expert” section. They contain approximately 190 ways in which a patient with clinical issues may present to a … Continue reading

Each year, our graduating class is asked to nominate a member to speak on their behalf at the Convocation ceremony. Last week, Yan Sim delivered an address on behalf of the Meds 2014 class. Yan’s heartfelt remarks certainly seemed to capture the sentiments of his colleagues and resonated with everyone in Grant Hall that afternoon.   It seemed clear that his … Continue reading

Dear Meds 2014, Since this picture was taken in September 2010, you have successfully undertaken no fewer than 38 courses of study, as well as numerous projects, reflections, surveys, and various exercises intended to prepare you to be effective physicians.  In doing so, you have engaged and answered (usually correctly) several thousand individual questions of various types. I have one … Continue reading

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The term “ivory tower” apparently has its origin in the Song of Solomon (7:4) where the writer describes the beauty of his beloved with a list of poetic terms, including “your neck is like a tower of ivory”.  The image found its way into descriptions of venerable figures, as depicted in “Hunt of the Unicorn Annunciation” (circa 1500).  For obscure … Continue reading

We would like to extend reluctant congratulations to Dr. Ted Ashbury on his retirement, and acknowledge his contributions to our Undergraduate Medical Program.  Here are remarks from Dr. Sanfilippo on the occasion of Dr. Ashbury’s retirement party: Ted Ashbury has been as important as any individual to our curricular renewal over the past 7 years.  He was conscripted, somewhat deviously, … Continue reading

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Striving for a Culture of Competency A few days ago walking through the hospital I ran into a very excited third year medical student who was anxious to tell me about a recent clinical experience.  Apparently she’d admitted a patient with a complex array of medical problems and, after considering the differential diagnosis, ordered a test that confirmed the presence … Continue reading

The student lecture entitled, “Let’s Talk Mental Health” is to take place Thursday, March 27th, 2014 from 6:00PM – 7:00PM in Lecture Hall 132A (main floor) in the School of Medicine Building (15 Arch St. in Kingston). Dr. Kevin Varley from the Department of Psychiatry will be there for the Q and A period. This event is open to the public. All … Continue reading

This report comes from Ellen Miles,Women’s Athletic Stick.   On February 7th, 2014 the faculties of Medicine and Law came together on a Friday afternoon for the first annual Med-Law Games. The first of its kind here at Queen’s, Med-Law Games was designed by a committee of students from both faculties to foster inter-professional competition while raising funds for local charities.   … Continue reading

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A great read: Faculty Focus Blog
Published Wed, July 23, 2014

As part of your summer reading list, may I encourage you to look at Faculty Focus, higher ed teaching strategies from Magna Publications. Whenever Maryellen Weimer writes, I sit up and pay attention, but actually the other contributers have great ideas, and provide evidence for them too.  This is not just for medical education, but for all educators in general. … Continue reading

How to integrate science into clinical courses and vice versa
Published Tue, July 22, 2014

How hard is this?  Not too hard.  Here are some ways to integrate science into the clinical courses (and vice versa) Hi all:  I’m recycling a recent post, having drastically reduced it.  I hope to write more about examples of integration and integrators from our curriculum in the future. You may think you don’t use basic science knowledge anymore.  Think … Continue reading

Thank you Dr. McLean
Published Mon, July 14, 2014

The following note was sent by one of our fourth year students to her community preceptor at the end of her Integrated Community Clerkship. Both parties have graciously agreed to allow me to share it with you. Dear Dr. McLean Thanks for: Teaching me Medicine Trusting me with your patients Introducing me to Perth Letting me be wrong Helping me … Continue reading

Tackling your summer “To Be Read” pile
Published Mon, July 7, 2014

Do you have an ever-growing “to-be-read” (TBR) pile of books and journals that you’ve told yourself all year you’ll get to “in the summer”? And now it’s summer and the pile is daunting and the beach is calling. What to do? Try these five steps to get started. Weeding the list (or culling the pile): If it’s been a while … Continue reading

One Day in Clinic…
Published Mon, June 30, 2014

Sarah (fictitious name to protect the innocent) is a second year medical student attending my Cardiology clinic for an “observership”. Like her peers, Sarah had an outstanding academic career prior to entering medical school, as well as a variety of personal experiences that demonstrated an interest in the human condition and commitment to public service. Since entering medical school, she … Continue reading