Curricular

 At this holiday time, when we focus on gift-giving, and celebrations, it is also good to reflect on those for whom gifts and celebrations are almost impossible. A few short weeks ago, Queen’s medical students participated in the Poverty Challenge which allowed them to experience living with less. The following article was written by Dr. Jenn Carpenter and Dr. Melanie … Continue reading

For a teenage boy growing up in a small town, the local auto mechanic can become a best friend and key to social success. I had great admiration for one in particular who would let me watch and explain what he was doing as he went about trying to resuscitate whatever antiquated pile of spare parts I was currently passing … Continue reading

Is it a problem, or just a shrewd investment? By the end of his or her medical education, the average Canadian graduate will owe $71,721. That amount, which has increased by about 7.3% over the past 5 years, may seem either huge or trivial depending on your perspective and stage of life. Interpretation might be enhanced with a few more … Continue reading

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Beyond competencies – What should every Canadian medical graduate be able to do? Consider this: When you find yourself a passenger on an aircraft coming in for a tricky landing on a stormy night, would you be more comforted by the knowledge that your pilot is an expert in aeronautics and aircraft design, or that he/she has demonstrated the ability … Continue reading

Soren Kierkegaard wrote “Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards.”  It was in this spirit that the UGME Curriculum and MD PEC Committees met a few weeks ago to review and celebrate the past work of the major subcommittees and their action plans for moving forward. We teach our students that it’s important to pause, … Continue reading

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There is, perhaps, no more common or expected site on a warm, late summer afternoon than that of a man mowing his lawn. When I came upon just such a scene during a solitary walk not too long ago, I nonetheless found it distinctive for two reasons. Firstly, the gentleman mowing the lawn was elderly. In fact, very elderly. A … Continue reading

We’re thankful for our students! It’s Thanksgiving again, and an opportunity for us to express gratitude. This year, we have had the gift of several groups of students working with us in Undergraduate Medical Education and we’d like to showcase their efforts and publicly thank them for their help in making our program even better! Making DIL work! Beginning with … Continue reading

Best Practices in DIL: Directed Independent Learning Thanks to Dr. Lindsay Davidson, Director of UG Teaching, Learning and Innovation for writing this blog article. Have you ever wondered about the mysterious learning event type used in the undergraduate MD program known as a DIL? You may even have your name associated with such an event but be unsure what you’re … Continue reading

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Are all exam questions created equal? Not really—different type of questions test different levels of understanding. In the UGME program, we use a variety of exam questions to assess student learning—broadly classified as multiple-choice questions (MCQs) and short-answer questions (SAQs). But within these broad categories are a range of types of questions designed to test different levels of cognition. We … Continue reading

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Formalizing opportunities for service-learning is increasingly important to schools of medicine, both for the inherent merits of service-learning itself (for both learners and communities), as well as for accreditation considerations. The Future of Medical Education in Canada (FMEC) report places a strong emphasis on social accountability, and service-learning is integral to carrying out this mandate: “Central to these social accountability … Continue reading

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Feedback requested on New or Updated Policies
Published Fri, January 23, 2015

Prior to a new or amended policy or regulation being submitted for final approval, it must be published for review and comment by faculty and/or students within the School of Medicine.  Feedback received will be directed to the Policy Sponsor. In the event that major changes are made based on this feedback, a new draft will be posted for additional comments. In keeping with … Continue reading

A Fragile Trust – Reflections on the Dalhousie Controversy
Published Mon, January 19, 2015

A patient reports to a hospital outpatient procedure unit early one morning for an electively planned, medically necessary surgical procedure. They divulge personal and sensitive information to a clerk. They disrobe at the request of a registered nurse. They allow a phlebotomist to start an intravenous line in their arm. They allow a resident physician to carry out a physical … Continue reading

Figuring out what’s important in a faculty evaluation report
Published Mon, January 12, 2015

Critics only make you stronger. You have to look at what they are saying as feedback. Sometimes the feedback helps, and other times, it’s just noise that can be a distraction. Robert Kiyosaki   Separating the useful feedback from the noise in students’ comments on faculty evaluation questionnaires is an annual challenge for all university instructors– not just at Queen’s … Continue reading

Educational Resolutions for the New Year
Published Mon, January 5, 2015

Welcome to 2015!  I have a few resolutions for my teaching I’d like to share with you from some reading over the holiday.  Feel free to add yours too!  Resolution  1:  Be learner-centred. I’ve written about this before, but translating learner-centred theory into practical advice is very helpful. Education happens in the brain, and giving learners the opportunity to use … Continue reading

Solstice
Published Mon, December 22, 2014

I find myself writing these words on the day of the winter solstice. The days that have been getting progressively shorter and darker stop doing so, and now begin to slowly lengthen and become brighter. The derivation of the word “solstice” is itself interesting, stemming from the latin sol (sun) and sistere (to stand still). It’s therefore a time when … Continue reading