Curricular

Post Thumbnail

Ritual is a big part of life; this is especially evident at universities at this time of year. I recently took part in the ritual of attending convocation at another university to watch my daughter receive her Bachelor of Health Sciences degree. In addition to the parental joy of seeing my daughter on stage for about six seconds of hooding … Continue reading

Post Thumbnail

By Dr. Melanie Walker, Course Director, Population & Global Health Each first year class in Queen’s UGME embarks on the ‘Community Based Interventions Project’ (CBIP) as part of their Population and Global Health (PGH) course. The project provides students with an opportunity to gain insight into social and health services that serve patients in the greater Kingston community. The students … Continue reading

Post Thumbnail

By Denisha Puvitharan (Meds 2020), Darsan Sadacharam (Meds 2020) and Sahra Nathoo (Meds 2019) Twenty-four curious high school students joined the ranks of diligent medical students in the halls of the Medical Building on March 31st. These students were taking part in the first ever “Pathways to Medicine” event hosted by Queen’s School of Medicine’s Diversity Panel. Through a new … Continue reading

Post Thumbnail

It’s Medical Variety Night (MVN) time of year at the School of Medicine and UGME students have been putting in long hours of practice and preparation. And they’re not the only ones – this year the show includes a feature performance by Faculty of Health Sciences Dean Richard Reznick. Co-director Manisha Tilak (2019) says you’ll have to show up to … Continue reading

Post Thumbnail

By Dr. Lindsay Davidson, Collaborator Lead   For several years, first year medical students have had the opportunity to shadow a non-physician health care provider for a half day as part of the Introduction to Professional Roles course. This initiative, championed by Dr. Sanfilippo, initially involved nurses at one institution and has grown to include 3 sites (KGH, HDH and … Continue reading

Post Thumbnail

Tucked on the right-hand side of every Learning Event Page on MEdTech are notations about the date & time and location of the class, followed by the length of the session and then the “Breakdown” of how the time will be spent. In other words: the learning event type. We use 14 learning event types* in the UGME program. The … Continue reading

“The People Who Make Organizations Go – or Stop” was the intriguing title of an article that appeared in the Harvard Business Review in 2002, authored by management experts Rob Cross and Laurence Prusak. In it, they describe the key people and largely informal networks that are necessary to the functioning of any organization, regardless of its purpose or product. … Continue reading

Post Thumbnail

By Drs. Heather Murray & Melanie Walker This year the School of Medicine is proud to invite you to the 5th annual Medical Student Research Showcase on Wednesday September 21st. This event celebrates the research achievements of our undergraduate medical students, with both posters and an oral plenary session featuring research performed by students while they have been enrolled in … Continue reading

Hi all:  I’m back from a few weeks at our family cottage near Sudbury. Now for those of you from north of Parry Sound, you know that it’s not a cottage, it’s a camp, but I’m translating for all the Southerners here at the UGME blog. I find that there’s nothing like total exhaustion from installing a new water pump, … Continue reading

When I first met Malcolm Williams, he was trying valiantly to teach me how to examine the back of a child’s throat without getting bitten or having the patient throw up on my white shirt and tie. He was only partially successful. Over the years, I’ve gotten to know Malcolm well, in various contexts. Such continuing and evolving relationships are … Continue reading

Post Timeline

Five things to do this summer: a Med Ed to-do list
Published Mon, June 19, 2017

This first year I worked in a post-secondary setting, I was somewhat bemused when students asked me how I was going to spend my summer – they were heading out on a three or four month “break” and assumed I was doing the same. Some had work plans, some travel, some both. Regardless, they would be away from campus and … Continue reading

Doctors, patients, ritual and showing up
Published Mon, June 12, 2017

Ritual is a big part of life; this is especially evident at universities at this time of year. I recently took part in the ritual of attending convocation at another university to watch my daughter receive her Bachelor of Health Sciences degree. In addition to the parental joy of seeing my daughter on stage for about six seconds of hooding … Continue reading

Sorry to interrupt but I just had this great idea: How learning about and adapting communication styles can help move group learning forward
Published Mon, June 5, 2017

When I last wrote to you in March, I asked if you were a constructive or destructive problem-solver in groups.  We do a lot of small group (and larger group) learning in Queen’s UGME and I hoped to give a great framework to help prevent groups from imploding before or while constructive work could be done. We looked at identifying … Continue reading

Curriculum Committee Meeting Information – April 26, 2017
Published Wed, May 31, 2017

Faculty and staff interested in attending Curriculum Committee meetings should contact the Committee Secretary, Candace Miller (candace.miller@queensu.ca), for information relating to agenda items and meeting schedules. A meeting of the Curriculum Committee was held on April 26, 2017.  To review the topics discussed at this meeting, please click HERE to view the agenda. Faculty interested in reviewing the minutes of … Continue reading

Teaching Einstein
Published Sun, May 28, 2017

How would you like to have been young Albert Einstein’s teacher? Walter Isaacson’s excellent biography, “Einstein. His Life and Universe” provides some intriguing glimpses of the great physicist’s early education that should be of interest to anyone involved in teaching gifted and naturally curious young people. Popular myth holds that Albert Einstein was a poor student in early life. Apparently … Continue reading