Our hospital and institutional problems are formidable, but not unprecedented: Finding lessons (and validation) in the past.

“The study of history is an antidote to the hubris of the present – the idea that everything we have, everything we do and everything we think is the ultimate, the best.” David McCullough   Mr. McCullough’s wise words can also serve as a reminder that the various challenges we find so troublesome today almost always have parallels in the … Continue reading

Medical school accreditation has been described, with some justification, as the colonoscopy of medical education. The parallels are rather striking: Both require a long and distinctly uncomfortable period of preparation. Both require a public exposure of personal features most would prefer to keep modestly hidden. Both can get messy. Both carry high potential for embarrassment. In both cases, the procedure … Continue reading

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Several times over the last few weeks, I’ve had conversations with course directors and instructors about writing learning objectives. Many people – from award-winning educators to rookies and everyone in between – find writing learning objectives a challenge. The typical advice of write out who will do what under what conditions is vague, so it’s often not very helpful. “General” … Continue reading

“The People Who Make Organizations Go – or Stop” was the intriguing title of an article that appeared in the Harvard Business Review in 2002, authored by management experts Rob Cross and Laurence Prusak. In it, they describe the key people and largely informal networks that are necessary to the functioning of any organization, regardless of its purpose or product. … Continue reading

Faculty and staff interested in attending Curriculum Committee meetings should contact the Committee Secretary, Candace Miller at candace.miller@queensu.ca for information relating to agenda items and meeting schedules. A meeting of the Curriculum Committee was held on October 27, 2016.  To review the topics discussed at this meeting, please click HERE to view the agenda. Faculty interested in reviewing the minutes … Continue reading

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By Mark Swartz, Copyright Specialist Understanding a few of the basic concepts behind Copyright law can help explain why some images can be used in certain situations and others cannot. The most useful concept to consider when thinking about how images can be used is balance. A Balancing Act In the landmark Supreme Court case Théberge v Galerie d’Art du … Continue reading

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By Mark Swartz, Copyright Specialist Understanding a few of the basic concepts behind Copyright law can help explain why some images can be used in certain situations and others cannot. The most useful concept to consider when thinking about how images can be used is balance. A Balancing Act In the landmark Supreme Court case Théberge v Galerie d’Art du … Continue reading

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We talk a fair bit about Pearls of Wisdom at the School of Medicine. The last class for the Class of 2016 ended with Pearls, presented by faculty selected by the class. Later this week, during orientation week, Pearls will be shared with our newly-minted class of 2020. Pearls are succinct pieces of advice, aphorisms or other sage musings designed … Continue reading

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When your objective is to write learning objectives…
Published Mon, January 16, 2017

Several times over the last few weeks, I’ve had conversations with course directors and instructors about writing learning objectives. Many people – from award-winning educators to rookies and everyone in between – find writing learning objectives a challenge. The typical advice of write out who will do what under what conditions is vague, so it’s often not very helpful. “General” … Continue reading

Our hospital and institutional problems are formidable, but not unprecedented: Finding lessons (and validation) in the past.
Published Sun, January 8, 2017

“The study of history is an antidote to the hubris of the present – the idea that everything we have, everything we do and everything we think is the ultimate, the best.” David McCullough   Mr. McCullough’s wise words can also serve as a reminder that the various challenges we find so troublesome today almost always have parallels in the … Continue reading

Blogging on Blogs
Published Mon, December 19, 2016

I was initially a reluctant blogger. Perhaps even skeptical. The advice and impetus to proceed came largely from our trusty MedTech folks, particularly Matt Simpson and Lynel Jackson, with encouragement from Jacqueline Findlay and other UG office staff. They felt it was the best option to address my request (they might term it whining) for a means to communicate on … Continue reading

After working so hard and achieving success, why are so many medical students depressed?
Published Sun, December 11, 2016

The first time David thought about becoming a doctor, he was 13 years old, in the eighth grade. He recalls that everyone thought it was a great idea. As a bright, naturally curious and diligent student with an outgoing personality, it seemed to his parents, teachers and friends a natural and entirely appropriate decision. All were supportive. In fact, they … Continue reading

Online modules can enhance curriculum content delivery
Published Mon, December 5, 2016

Do you want to build an eModule? Online modules, or eModules, are one of the content delivery methods available for use in our UGME curriculum. As with any content delivery method, the teacher’s job is to define objectives, then organize and deliver new content to students. Online modules can deliver content efficiently and creatively but they’re not without potential pitfalls, … Continue reading