Finding hope amid the chaos: The baffling, reassuring, authentic appeal of Bernie Sanders

The ongoing and rather turbulent journey that is the American presidential election provides many opportunities to despair for the future of democratic institutions. However, a lone beacon for optimism arising from the whole spectacle may be the completely unanticipated appeal of one Mr. Bernie Sanders.   Mr. Sanders, the 75-year-old Brooklyn born son of Polish-Jewish immigrants and current junior senator … Continue reading

Medical school accreditation has been described, with some justification, as the colonoscopy of medical education. The parallels are rather striking: Both require a long and distinctly uncomfortable period of preparation. Both require a public exposure of personal features most would prefer to keep modestly hidden. Both can get messy. Both carry high potential for embarrassment. In both cases, the procedure … Continue reading

This week, I’ve invited one of our soon-to- be-graduating students, Elizabeth Clement (Meds 2016), to report on the LEAD (LEadership Enhancement and Development) program, an initiative she and a group of her colleagues have conceived and completed over the past year. When Liz, Alia Busuttil and Graydon Simmons first came to me with this idea, I must admit to thinking … Continue reading

Post Thumbnail

By Chris Griffiths The Concussion Education, Safety and Awareness Program (CESAP) seeks to reach a broad audience on the prevention, identification and management of concussion injuries. According to the Centre for Disease Control, 65% of all concussions occur in those aged 5-18, and concussions make up 13.2% of high school sports injuries (CDC, 2015). As high school populations are at … Continue reading

William Ford Connell was by all accounts a highly regarded educator and mentor here at Queen’s.  Among many accomplishments he’s remembered for his critical role in the achievement of admitting women to the program and inspirational guidance to many graduating students. For many years an award in his name has been presented to a faculty member at convocation.  The award … Continue reading

Post Thumbnail

By Mark Swartz, Copyright Specialist Understanding a few of the basic concepts behind Copyright law can help explain why some images can be used in certain situations and others cannot. The most useful concept to consider when thinking about how images can be used is balance. A Balancing Act In the landmark Supreme Court case Théberge v Galerie d’Art du … Continue reading

Post Thumbnail

By Mark Swartz, Copyright Specialist Understanding a few of the basic concepts behind Copyright law can help explain why some images can be used in certain situations and others cannot. The most useful concept to consider when thinking about how images can be used is balance. A Balancing Act In the landmark Supreme Court case Théberge v Galerie d’Art du … Continue reading

Post Thumbnail

This weekend many involved in undergraduate medical education at Queen’s are heading to Montreal for the annual Canadian Conference on Medical Education (CCME). From faculty, to students, to administrative staff, we’re attending as presenters, workshop facilitators, and in several other roles. As described on its website, CCME is the largest annual gathering of medical educators in Canada. Attendees include Canadian … Continue reading

Post Timeline

Finding hope amid the chaos: The baffling, reassuring, authentic appeal of Bernie Sanders
Published Mon, May 23, 2016

The ongoing and rather turbulent journey that is the American presidential election provides many opportunities to despair for the future of democratic institutions. However, a lone beacon for optimism arising from the whole spectacle may be the completely unanticipated appeal of one Mr. Bernie Sanders.   Mr. Sanders, the 75-year-old Brooklyn born son of Polish-Jewish immigrants and current junior senator … Continue reading

Reducing the Burden of Concussions Through Education
Published Mon, May 16, 2016

By Chris Griffiths The Concussion Education, Safety and Awareness Program (CESAP) seeks to reach a broad audience on the prevention, identification and management of concussion injuries. According to the Centre for Disease Control, 65% of all concussions occur in those aged 5-18, and concussions make up 13.2% of high school sports injuries (CDC, 2015). As high school populations are at … Continue reading

Teachers and Learners “Spring” Forward for Each Other
Published Mon, May 9, 2016

By Jonathan Krett, Aesculapian Society President, Meds’18 Recently I attended the Canadian Federation of Medical Students Spring General Meeting in Montreal, QC. Sitting around a table with medical student society presidents from across the country discussing a variety of issues really drove home that at Queen’s School of Medicine, we students have it pretty good. One of our strengths is … Continue reading

Celebrating Student LEADership
Published Mon, May 2, 2016

This week, I’ve invited one of our soon-to- be-graduating students, Elizabeth Clement (Meds 2016), to report on the LEAD (LEadership Enhancement and Development) program, an initiative she and a group of her colleagues have conceived and completed over the past year. When Liz, Alia Busuttil and Graydon Simmons first came to me with this idea, I must admit to thinking … Continue reading

Jordan Spieth’s painful pursuit of perfection, green jackets, and learning from failure.
Published Mon, April 25, 2016

The Masters Tournament is almost too perfect. The golf course itself is pristine and picturesque – every vista a postcard. The golfers are skilled, the spectators robotically well behaved, the commentators obsequious in their adulation of the players, the course, the “tradition”. Even the caddies are required to dress in the same white overalls, seemingly to blend in and not … Continue reading